Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on November 16, 1966 · Page 7
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 7

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Mt Vernon, Illinois
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Wednesday, November 16, 1966
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Page 7
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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1966 THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS MURIEL LAWRENCE Teen-age 'Mops' Protest The World We Give em By MURIEL LAWHENCE Newspaper Enterprise Assn. All this past year a youthful male neighbor of ours has been parading shoulder-length tresses in and out of our apartment elevator. Yesterday he visited the barber and had them cut off. Noting his changed appearance, I cried, "Oh Bill, how really handsome you looi? with your h«ir short!" I succeeded in conveying my admiration so sincer- tell us how you feel about it. wonderful in order to get him there. Granting that Bill is right, this flowing tresses passion among our teen-aged sons seems to be just another one of those breal<down in communication circuits between them and us. Just as we can't afford to pose 36 Students On Honor Roll At Waltonville High School . There are 36 students on the Tliose with a 4.0 to 4.49 ave- honor roil at the Waltonville high ! rage are: Freshmen; Julia Dar- school for the first quarter. _ ^^^g^ Lee Ann Dycus. Susan Those with a 4.5 to 5.0 ave- p^y^ ^ale Lewis, Laurel Man- less, either. For while we preach gree," Bill said. "That 's the pro-; the necessity of their "making blem. You want us to lil<e it. You're at us all the time to think about what job we're going to do in it, how to make good in it and put up with all thei't'o appreciate" wliar sociologists .^^^ thirds in it the way you j call the "cultural shocks" they ely that I was allowed In on • do. That's why we grow our hair ere experiencing can produce, the long-hair philosophy of the! so long. It's a protest move- not merely shoulder-length tres- good" in it, its shortcomings are hitting their ingenuous souls vfith' ^V," g"' an impact those shortcomings! ' have lost for us. And our failure"? i Gnevo, Jack Keri^. Seniors: Cfol Hollowaj-, Joe Kabat Dor- Caroline GajewsW, Mary Mc- °thy McKinney, Lmda Noms, Cowen, George Morgan. Shirley Marcella Roberson, Seniors: Paula Beckham, Pat Fnsch,, Dan- (Mary Jane Studio) MR, AND MRS. E, C. CROMEANS OF DIX are shown on their wedding day, which occurred sixty years pgo, and as they are today. Mrs. Cromeans is the former Miss Grace Finnie. They were nnorried November 16, 1906, at BIytheville, Ark., and are the parents of four children: Odis Cromeans of Centralia, Elbert Cromeans of Sorento, III., Mrs. Hazel Opel of Denver, Colorado, and Mrs. Wilma Duncan of Malta, III. They also have iileven grandchildren and twenty-one greatgrandchildren. The happy occasion will be celebrated with a family dinner next Sunday, November 20, at Two Tonys in West Frankfort. Dallas Cowboys Scout Illinois Wesleyan Star BLOOMINGTON, 111. (AP) Quarterback Steve Laub of lUi- nois Wesleyan opened his college football career as a defensive specialist, closed it with a batch of records and now face.s the possibility of a professional career. No less an emissary than former quarterback great Bobby Layne was sent by tlie Dallas Cowboys to watch Laub in action this season. Lisle Blackbourn of the Green Bay Packers was among other scouts who watched Laub perform this year. Laub 's records alone would warrant a look by pro scouts. The 6-foot-l, 185-poundcr set nine College Conference of Illinois records. He started out as a defensive back his freshman year and tlien took over the offense. In three •easons he completed 282 passes in 497 attempts for 4,004 yards and 48 touchdowns. Wesleyan Coach Don Larson was told by one scout tliat Laub and Bob Griese of Purdue were tha two best pro prospects in the Midwest, The fact that Layne and • Blackbourn were sent to scout Laub indicates Dallas and Green Bay think highly of the man who guided Wesleyan to an overall three year record of 204-1 including a Cd champion- •hlp last year and a tie for sec*> end place this season. However, if the pros want Laub they'll have to wait until MABBIN' SAM ABOUT TO PEBFORM A WEDDIN' IN "LI'L ABNEB"—With the help of the three Scraggs (Terry Kent, Davul Clayton, and Kevin Davis) and their guns, Marryin' Sam (Mark Wheeler) reluctantly starts to marry Daisy Mao (Ginger Coats) and Earthquake McGoon (Bruce Clin) in "LI'L ABNER" playing at the lilgh school auditorium Thursday and Friday night at 8:00. The statue is Jesse Bee. the end oE the basketball season. Tiie mathematics major is captain of Wosleyan's basketball season and will not sign a contract until the end of the cage season. For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Wedding," send Sl.OO to Abby, Box 69700, Los Angeles, Cal. 90069. Lynda Bird Writes Fast For Magazine By KELLY SMITH WASHINGTON (AP) - Lynda Bird Johnson, career girl with a chauffeur, may turn out to be one of the speediest maga- aine WTiters on the circuit. In her third full week with McCalls magazine, she is said to have completed one stoi-y and is researching a second. Lynda is taking the typewriter seriously and coworkers say she is fast and eager. •ttie 22-year-old elder daugii- tei* of President and Mrs. Johnson started her part-time "around $10,000' a year job with \ a two-week internship in tlie New York office. Now, as part of the Washington news corps — more than 2,000 strong — she works in an office building near her lather's Two mornings in a row. a White House limousine has pulled up to a curb on busy Connecticut Avenue. Lynda, wearing a suit, alighted with a Secret Service man. There were pas- tt?morninl !-ush"°*''^ HANDSOME RICKY KiSELEWSKI AND PRETTY KELLEY "^Th ^'Sugh the double J. AN BEVIS have been chosen Prince and Princess of the .u.! Franklin school Parent-Teacher Association. He is tlie son of teen-aged American youth. "We let our hair grow," Bill said, "because we don't like the world you grownups have made." "We're not so madly in love with it either," I said, "The point is, why you people don't ment against adjustment to I ges, straggly beards and aver- things we know are WTong." i sion to showers and laundered So, if you're the parent of a long-tressed teen-age son who refuses to visit the barber shop, you may have to stop pretending that you think the world is chinos but far more serious forms of protest and resentment. We're used to the broken promises of politicians. They are not. We have lived for many ny Dees, Mike Hicks, Jack Kiselewski, Gwon Lance, Bob Mi- years with the American ardor hall, Connie Tepovich. for freedom that at the same time maintains the Negro in second-class citizenship. They have not. We are accustomed to pic- Troubled? Write to Abby, Box 69700, Los Angeles, Cal., 90069. •tures of war's brutalities in our. For a personal reply, inclose a newspapers but they are not. {stamped, self-addressed envelop As freshly feeling people, they leem to need a better sympathy For Abby's booklet, "How to Have a Lovely Wedding," send with their disillusions than they. $1.00 to Abby, Box 69700, Log Anare receiving from us. 'geles, Cal. 90069. glass doors,, a smile for the lobby guard and up the elevator to the eighth-floor, beige-carpeted office headed by Christine Sadler Coe, a family friend. Lynda has her own large desk, covered with yellow legal pads, notes, magazines and a telephone. She shares Mrs. Coe's office. Lynda, serious about her job, wants no publicity about herself, no photogi-aphs. She says she wants a chance to prove Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Kiselev^ski of 722 Dewey and she is tlie daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Larry K. Bevis of 819 north Sixth street. Both are pre-school age. They are shown with the lovely trophies which were presented as a highlight of the recent supper and bazaar held at Franklin school. (Mary Jane Studio) and can apply for theherself first. Her first article offiqe White House Correspondents association. may appear early next year, magazine spokesman said. Don't Tell Your Psychiatrist By HAL BOYLE both my wife and my employer KEW YORK (AP) —Remarks! Understand me completely." that psychiatrists get tired ofi "Would you please tell the hiearmg: ."Whom do you guys tell your troubles to—bartenders?" doctor that I am Napoleon—and don't care to be kept waiting. I am on my way back fi'om Mos- { ''fvTrrvou sure'you're Dr. Wei- cow and must reach Elba by j that my husband was seen in lin^on Cortex, the psychiati'ist? ; nightfall." I ^h.s little town havmg dmner I thought all psychialrists wore; "I don't believe you beard a word I said. Frankly, doctor, for thought hoards—like beatniks." "If I want my head shi-unk, rJI take it to a good Chinese hand laundi-y." "I admit I'm kind of dumbi $50 an hour,* I tliought you could DEAR ABBY .. . Monkey Business Could Be Her Line Abigail Von Buren DEAR ABBY : My husband I repaired. Should he send her a sells on the road. Lately he' bill? I'd appreciate an answer seems to \K spending a lot of j to this question. And so would time in a small town he used lots of other electricians' wives, to pass thru. I've wondered why ONE WIFE because in the past he's never DEAR WIFE: I doubt if this gotten enough business out of will come as a shock to any that town to justify spending tlie electi-ician, but here's the only night there. .solution: Figure the labor by Yesterday someone (old me j the hour and add cost of material. If the electrician WANTS tmdo tlie friend or relative with a rather attractive young woman. They appeared to be very much interested in each at least hear me out without j °lhf''- , , , , , When I asked my husband a- yawnmg. "If I do toll you what's secret- about these things, but what'ly gnawing on me. Doc, what puzzles me is-is tliere much guarantee do I have that you difference bet\veen astrology won't blab it all over to\vn?" and psychiatry?" "Wellington, you'll "What do you mean that I'llj have to! have to learn to stand on my bout it he admitted being with a woman thei-e, but he said it was for strictly business reasons. Do you think ho is seeing her for "business reasons?" SUSPiaOUS DEAR SUSPICIOUS: I don't punish the children. I'm afraid own tAvo feet? If I could do that, j ^^^^.^ business? tiiat if I do it I'll leave them Why would I be lymg down on j .j^^^ ^33^. ^ ^^^^^^ With emotional scars." your couch here in the first "I don't care if this is Nation- 1 Place?" «1 Mental Health Week, Doc. If' = i^ou tell me I hate my mother, I'll punch you right in the eye." "They say that after he took that tourist ti-ip to Vienna, he doubled his rates." "Don't try to pull the wool over my eyes. Doc. I've read a little Freud myself, and I still lay he was just a nasty-mlhded old man." "Before we begin, do you mind if I just look under the couch? I'm the cautious type." "My problem. Doc, is that My husband is a hard working electrician. Oc; casionally he'll do little jobs af- "Boy, if you ever talk m youiv ter hours as a favor to a friend sleep, Doc, I'll bet your wife relative. But so many people really hears an earful!" ,think it is his "hobby" and that "All I want IS a couple of • enjoys doing these jobs af- quick lessons in psychiatry that • ter his regular work day! And will enable me to get my boss to here's another question: WHO give me a raise." I should he charge, and WHO "Is it true. Doc, that all you' guys are a little off base yourselves, or you wouldn't be in this business?" "I ju,st got your bill. Doc. If you expect me to pay it, you'd better put me under hypnosis— treal deep hypnosis." shouldn't he charge? How can he charge his sister- in-law's father when he has never charged his sister? Also, he wired a lamp for his neighbor for free, then lier daii.ijhter, who my husband didn't even know, «ent her waffle iron oyer, to be that big a favor, he sends no bill, thervvise, he presents the bill with the I 'epaired item. DEAR ABBY: Recently a family was transfen-ed from the east coast to the west coast. The 18-year-old boy (not in semce) in this family had been dating a girl on the east coast. The girl has been invited by this boy to fly out and spend the Chritmas holidays with this boy and his family. The gu-I and her mother are all excited about it and are preparing her for the ] trip. I think under tlie circumstances, the boy is the one who should do the flying. What do you think? Call me a Dad who is - OLD FASHIONED DEAR OLD FASHIONED; I think you're right, unless there are extenuating circumstances not mentioned in your letter. CONFIDENTIAL TO D.F.K.: Unfortunately, letters that should ner have been written and ought immediately to be desti'oy- -ed are Uie only ones worth keep- init SAVE AT ^ THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY! Celebrating With Storewide Savings! CHARGE ITf TERRIFIC VALUES! BUY NOW FOR CHRISTMAS AND LADIES' BULKY KNJT ORION if LADIES' ROLL-UP SLEEVE PERMANENT PRESS SHIRTS REG. Ladies' Flats and Sports TO Terrific selection of brand new styles and colors. Sizes 5 to 10. 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