The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota on January 7, 1959 · Page 1
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The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota · Page 1

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Wednesday, January 7, 1959
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The Weather .-- tonight; Thursdoy 18 ?'0 I I ond « lrf e r .' h<9h todoy '8-29; low tonight zero to 10 obove. AUSTIN DAILY HERALD Vnt. PYVWT it .. _ ^*k *^^"*"^ . VOL. cxxxvi AUS TIN. MINN., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 1959 SINGLE COPY FOR 3RD TERM Price of Free Government Is Heavy, Warns Freeman By JACK B. MACK AY ST. PAUL (AP) — Gov. Orville L. Freeman, inaugurated today for a third term, warned the 198 lawmakers at a joint convention of Minnesota's 61st Legislature that "no price is too great to pay for freedom" and made it clear that the cost of making Tree government work will be heavy. Flanked by the seven black- robed members of the State Supreme Court and the state's constitutional officers, Freeman stressed that the state must raise standards of education, of humanitarian service, of economic growth and of personal and governmental integrity. House Speaker Sitting with the governor were newly-elected House Speaker E, J. Chilgren of Littlefork, a veteran of 32 years continuous legislative service, and Lieut. Gov. Karl Rolvaag, who was administered his oath the opening day of the Legislature Tuesday, Rolvaag presides as president of the Senate. The governor said he would discuss the costs of government in his budget message next Wednesday, when both houses meet jointly again. At that time he promised to detail the tax measures which he believes will equitably and prudently meet governmental costs. Highest in History Freeman plans to present a budget of 466 million dollars—the highest in history. This means that 84 million dollars more revenue will be needed in the form of new or increased taxes for the next two years. "The cost of securing the things we want in Minnesota—the cost of making free government work— this cost will be heavy," Freeman said. "And a portion of this cost must be met in this legislative biennium by additional revenue." He spoke of the challenge thrust at this country by the Communist nations. He talked of the role PLENTY OF PROTECTION — Automatic weapons provide protection for President Manuel Urrutia of Cuba as he arrives to address a student rally at the AN ABRUPT HALT University of Havana. The President was accompanied by several members of his cabinet. (AP Photofax) All Past Agreements Cancelled as Utilities Wage Negotiations Stop in ?e- Red Envoy Arrives in Cleveland Starts 13-Day Trip Through Country; Anti-Reds Gather CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP) —Anastas I. Mikoyan, No. 2 man of the Kremlin, arrived in Cleveland today to start a 13-day coast-to-coast tour. He bustled off a plane and down a double line of police. Several hundred picketing nationality groups were blocked back by ropes. Mikoyan tipped his hat as he got off a Capital Airlines plane about five minutes after it arrived at 10:10 a.m. Then he hurried inside the concourse gates to hold a brief news conference before leaving the airport. Cyrus Eaton, Cleveland industrialist, and his wife greeted Mi- koyan, Mrs. Eaton speaking in Russian. Should Wear Hat Mikoyan told her it was very- good to speak Russian 'with her, and solicitously advised the 75- year-old Eaton, who will be his host here, that he should wear a hat on his white-haired head, lest he catch cold. Several hundred Iron Curtain country nationality groups had gathered at the airport. They carried such signs as "Blackmailer," 'Mikoyan, your hands are red with Russian blood." During the flight he sat beside Soviet Ambassador Mikhail Men- shikov, who read him news from New York and Washington newspapers. Eggs for Breakfast A dimpled airline stewardess, Miss Rita Sylvester, 23, of West Warwick, R. I., served the 03- year-old Mikoyan a break- 20 Pages If your barber seem* strangely silent, he may have Judt finished cutting a woman's hair. oor Leader Congress Convenes as Republicans Split WASHINGTON (AP) - Senate Republicans today chose Sen. Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois to be their floor loader lor the new session of Congress. 9n il° d °4 f i eat ?, cl o S , 0 ?; Joi ? 1 , 1 Sherman Cooper of Kentucky 20-14, with all 34 Republican senators participating , Jty, a s ! milar 2 °- 14 mar g ln Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel Vn, "T? 1 ? was ch °sen whip or assistant floor leader. 1 he Dirkscn victory was a defeat for the group of self-styled progressive or liberal senators led by Sen George Aiken of. Vermont, Emerging from the two-hour closed-door session Aiken iled and said the results "were t Utilities Board and an employe j previous offers after the wage committee canceling all pre-jment cancellations by Miles" agree- vious agreements in a strained atmosphere. Preferred Full Board made soon. i and ne told her it was very good. The no action motion was read Mikoyan inspected the cockpit to Miles and his committee who j of the Vickers Viscount and talked _ . , said Previous agreements we re! with the pilot, George Donnahoo Fr P rt Mil*. T i o«, u • iu Prevlous to the wa & e talks - the! made by a four-man board and i34, of Falls Church Va a 13 ,! d ^±' ^" 7 ^ neSS !^ had V0ted for acti °" by a argued that the employes "should ^ ^ * "' Minnesotans must play sponding to the educational c^l-j a g. ent . representing the employes|full board rather"uian"just "the ! m>t'be "the" Mlygoat'"*because a ienge posed by the threat of Com- sald he would open negotiations (four members present on any! board appointment had not been month and| major decisions, but amended its: made. munist effort. "We must maintain the level of public services that is essential to the preservation and extension hei indicated wage requests would be higher at that time. Tuesday's heated action follow- • j | ( ... . " ' —: . ^ • ~v-*.« . ^wi-ca ui uc^JuaiL lOLdllllg .J)Doo,UuU. said. We must maintain the in- wage increase after the board had I Board member E. B. (Bud) tegrity of our government. We must observe the highest ethical standards of performance." Emphasizes Education Of major importance among the hassled over full board participation. Definitely Not Acceptable A 4Vi per cent increase along with an insurance plan recom- public services is education, thel mended by Miles or a five per governor emphasized. He urged the extension of state aid to all of the school children, adding: "We can see to it that the lending power of our state government is extended even more generously to those of our school districts facing heavy building problems. We can prepare for the 50,000 new students who will be seeking high- cent increase without the insur- proposal after meeting with Miles, j The earlier board action was, Under discussion at the time was! amended by Grose and the "no-1 the reinvestment of four certifi-! action" portion regarding labor' ins was deleted. The agreement reopening wage «•<« <* MIKOYAN (Continued on Page 19) Joe Stalin, Winnie Started War, Says U.S. , , u , .-.._„-_ w ,. v -, WASHINGTON (AP) - The although a member, Hugh Plunkett i goat" for the recent hike in the ! United States told the Soviet Un- Grose said that he felt that any ! talks was the last one made be- action on the certificates as wellitween the board and the wage as any major decisions should committee, be made by a full board. Blames Gas Rate Hike Chairman Ed Smith said that Miles said wages was "the billy- J,, had resigned ,,he " serve aT Mifes tol"d "the T v able, Miles told the board, and ; which calls for members to he said he had been authorized by j until a replacement had been his committee to cancel previous ' made by the mayor agreements on shift differential! A motion by Grose calling for wa g ra ad c "-ter ! considered being the cae of h hikes w e r t ; ' on and the world today that Joseph Stalin, not Winston Church- increase, ill, started the cold war. Only 15 employes were connect-' M said the Soviet Union, not the ed with the gas department and' Weste ™ powers, wrecked cooper- only their wages were considered al ' on in Germany at the end of nav anH empr-an,^,, „( „ i i • , «-«..«i 6 <ui . umjr men wayes were considered a "' J " "' utri; pay and emergency stand-by ser- important decisions made only in computing the wage gas hike'World War II. At a meeting Dec. 23 the board ruled out of when there was a full board was'figure, William Dunlap, board! S "" th Distorting History TOP GOP CONTENDERS — Senators JM™ Sherman Cooper, Kentucky, left, and Everett M. Dirkscn Illinois pose in a traditional handshake before the closed-door session of Senate Republicans, meeting to name leaders for the 86th Congress. An insurgent group backed Cooper and the conservative bloc supported Dirksen (APPhotofax) SMALL TALK — Senators John Kennedy, Massachusetts, left, and Theodore Green, Rhode Island talk informally as Democratic senators assemble today for a caucus befoer the opening.of the new session of Congress. (APPhotofax) AT BRANDON smiled ses at work." the results "were the democratic proces- Nixon Gelling Credit, B!ame From His Parly! (AP) — credit br blame—whether he serves either or not ~ for being j^ the directing incluence behind! d(1 J! some changes in the Republican 1 ' He defeated Sen. John Sherman Cooper of Kentucky 20-14, with all M Republican senators participating. By a similar 20-14 margin Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel of California was chosen whip or assistant floor leader. The Dirksen victory was a de- jfcat for the group of self-styled [progressive or liberal senators led party. from Aiken smiled results "were the processes at work." chusetls, ousted Tuesday as House minority leader, pointed a finger in Nixon's direction in accounting for h. defeat b Re p Ch Hallcck of Indiana Conservative forces were quar- jterbnrketl by Sen. Styles Bridges of New Hampshire. Kuchel was the candidate of the Liberal group and his election should give MP- prestige in legislative actions. Rp-electcd without opposition . . , ., , ' WL ''' e Bridges as chairman 6f the Asked if the vice president had senate GOP Policy Committee a hand m bringing about his over- Sen. Leverett Saltonstall of Mas- throw Martin replied, "All I know; sai , husfi tts as chairman of the Conis that his people were against.' f (u -piice of All RenublicanR nmi me-actively against me." i Sen . Milton Y oun 3 of North Da- Martin went on to say that kola as secretary of the confer- some White House aides had met ence. a month ago with Halleck and im-1 MuntH Opponent plied they were against his re-1 Kuchel's opponent' was Karl election because "I was a little j Mimdt of South Dakota, advanced more independent than I should!at the last hour by .the conserva- be-of them." j tive group Halleck denied any White House! The 86th Congress convened today intervention. There was no com-' already torn by wrangling over -lent from Nixon. Republican leadership posts and, Informed Nixon the Sround rules for a looming Senate Republican liberals, re- new battle on civil rights, belling against installing Sen. Ev-j T))e bang of gavels in Senate erett Dirksen of Illinois as party and House chambers at noon Father, 5 Children Die in State Blaze BRANDON, Minn. (AP) — A , - r ., Miles. Dunlap said! I" a 53-page booklet on Soviet' n her a " d h ! s fie c!lild '' e » - • suiaents wno will be seekins hiuh- and pmnlrwp* w»r U „„!„ f,,,,, n. J -' """"• o«u acucuuj, LUIU miies. uuniap said; •"' " J^-page DOOKIBI on Soviets , . ,. ' ' er education in our state byi£o» cent Z t on uL^l f h ^' J e , motl . on was re P hl ' ased to read > J>° stretch of the imagination Premier N i k i t a Khrushchev's "^ '" ? f ' re hat swe P l their In contrast with the field o f Su-!pe cent hike wUhout nl,r f f« the certificates of: could the increase be called the drive to oust the Western powers''""""™ h "™ *"" *' aw^j&^iSHS^'s 5 ™ s • ^ =i= - result of Iabor deniands ' :fromM " theunited ""•" ac ' : door to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Weinrich. loor leader, have denied Nixon las aided them in any way. But before they launched their drive, hey informed the vice president in some detail of their plans. It has been Nixon's contention that the GOP has" failed to sell itself to the average voter and that the Democrats won their victories last November because they had projected the idea they were for the little man. (EST) launched the session before packed galleries gay with the bright dresses of admiring women folk of the members. But beneath the normal hearts and flowers atmosphere, collective blood pressures were seldom higher for an opening session. Senate Republicans had just come from a party caucus where CONGRESS (Continued on Page 19) real competition to this nation in'wage relation to humanitarian works. He urged the needed services in I Sin's? youthX mSjiTai AGAINST PICTATORSHI PS and handicapped. Expand Economy The governor laid considerable emphasis on the need for expansion of economic productivity, adding that there are urgent needs which can be supported only by a rapidly expanding economy. Next meeting will be about Feb.! "used the Soviet government 0 f! Sm ° ke ' The mother esca P ed - Weinrich said he and his wife! Fl LI BUSTER CONTROVERSY here. All appar-! were awakened at 2:30 a.m. by been overcome by heavy pounding on their bedroom win- T , . , Board il, 60 days before the April 1 ex-' rewriting and di.ston.nu; the hisn-l Mark Kelly, about 38, lost his ooa remembers noted that a new ap-ipiration of the working agreement. r y ol th e last quarter of a cen- ; We as he attempted to reach up- tury in an effort to build a case iSlairs bedrooms to rescue his two for the Khrushchev campaign. j small daughters. Kelly's three The booklet was released by the! sons > tw o of them teen agers, State Department a few hours aft-' came within a few feet of readier Khrushchev's No. 2 man Dep.' in 8 safety before they collapsed. Castro Indicates Cuba to Stay Away From Commie Relations HAVANA, Cuba (AP) - Fidel . , - e The recent recession demon- j Castro, Cuba's revolutionary hero -strated only too well how inti- 1 indicated today the island's pro.' will seer deStiny is i visional government clear ° f di ' 3l °"' atic h ^e Soviet Union and other Com- l ittsburgh shut down, iron ore nnmist countries. mines in Minnesota also shuti The down." j he does not wish to make state-;the government of Fulgencio Ba ments indicating he is interfering | tista. with the government of provisional President Manuel Urrutia. dow. "We got up but couldn't find anyone there," he said. "Then he saw Mrs. Kelly running between the two houses. All she had on was a slip and her skin was black from soot and smoke." Wasted Time "She told us the house was on Premier Anastas I. Mikoyan, left! Dead besides Kelly were the i fire and said'I wasted all my time Washington on a tour of the na- sons ' Jim . 15. Patrick, 14, and i trying to call the fire department. McCarthy in Favor of Revising Senate Rules tion. Mikoyan returns here around Den nis, 11; and two daughters, 11 think I wasn't dialing right.' " Jan. 19 for a meeting with Presi- Marilee, 10, and Pegy, 3. dent Eisenhower. Avoid Crisis Mikoyan in two days here ere- Fair Condition By RICHAKD P. POWERS WASHINGTON (AP) - Minnesota's new Democratic senator, ident Eisenhower's plans for a balanced budget. I can't run my farm very long Eugene J. McCarthy, was pre Weinrich dressed hurriedly and I Pared today to throw his weight i go along," he said, „„„,„„„ , ra " to tl)e Kel| y "owe as Mrs. j behind the move to revise the Sen- Karth, who takes over the House Mrs. Kelly, 36, who fled from !KelIy sh ° Uted " Save my bat) y.i a ' burning home to summon j 8BVe my hnh " " ' unless I balance the budget as I seat vacated by McCarthy when The Cabinet of Urrutia worked newspaper Diario rie la rm, .. ! Marina quoted Castro as savins support," but that it is basic to , ne *WP* r sald Castro had the integrity of the democrat ! » asked . about rdatlo » s with FKFE.M\N i° r countnes and especially the i Soviet Union, as he continued his (slow trip to Havana. Communist propaganda has praised Castro and attacked the regime of the fallen Fulgencio Batista. Castro also lashed out against by Missibmen ^ed 01 ^ S I "a menace for America." Diario de la Marina also quoted 'astro as saying a rebel law con; fiscatinR all British goods in Cii'r>a .siill is on the books but is subject to rutilK'Htiun by the provisional government. Castro did not say this would (Continued on Page 19) Matdor Fired Missibmen (AP) CAPE CANAVKHAL, -Air Fonv ;iii.^;!ei;.i :i .in <! an- othfT liiiii-mili 1 Malniloi- i>u a truin- .i\-fi flipiit i:\ n tin Ai!;u:ij,r l.xlay. Tlic 4n-f.,...t ni.:-s]|o, opt'i'Mtional with US iiiini-.ry units since J95-), roared oif \uth a flash of', "!'"" u"" """ ""•' 1 *'." 3 "'•""" n , , , . , b <- done, however, explaining that orange fbme nnd was out ot sight »«»»6 "^i in less than a minute. Men from ihe 45or>th Missile Test Wing at Orlando Air Force tJuse were at the controls on this special training flight. ; JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) - Gov The Matador is a turbojet pow- William A. Egan, who has spent ered pilolless bomber. It is now most of his time as governor of on sites in lli-nnany and Formosa this new state in the hospital, was and is about to be taken into resting comfortably today 'after South Korea undergoing surgery. Confiscation Castro ordered the confiscation!period until elections when Britain was selling arms to|l8 to 24 months. Mikoyan in two days here ere- i| le burning home to summon i 8BVe m Y baby '" I McCarthy, who defeated Sen. he was elected to the Senate, said ated the impression that Khrush- help, escaped with slight burns ! Weinrich raced to thc Kell >' back ! Edward J. Thye (R-Minn) in last ihe also believes the budget should chev is determined to make Suffering shock she was taken to i door but said " il would have been Democratic sweep, takes the be balanced if at all possible, changes in the status of occupied ! an Alexandria hospital where lur SUicide to try to get in '" Position that civil rights Jegisla- "I don't believe we should spend Berlin but would nwfpr tn -jv^iri , >:<:, _.. . . . . , x/i,.,. f ,.n.. i-i.i iu.. «,..••. "°n should be passed to imolempnt, iust. to snenrf " vv~n. -»:j nn.-i far into Tuesday night preparing |—, 6C3 ,„ 11JC siaius 0 , occupied'an Alexandria hosoitil wl, P ,- P h, r ; ^^™?. tw ^^'**?. but rf PrCfer l ° a "° id eiSS^rSSSar^. 11 "! Mrs. Kelly told the Weinrichs are held lira crisis with the Western powers; The mother, apparently first to! she R ot U P and went d own to the I in the process. , awaken, ran in night clothing next j livi "K roorn when she smelled smoke. She said she saw flames j coming from the davenport or the lamp which was next to it. Couldn't Wake CHUlren D^-i' lves ''ng be passed to implement just to spend, the 195-4 Supreme Court gation decision. Rule 22 Change McCarthy is backing the position taken by Sens. Paul Douglas CD-Ill), Hubert J. Humphrey (D- Minn), Jacob Javits (R-NY) and spend Karth said. "But at the same time if it is necessary to go beyond a balanced budget at times to meet the needs of the people, then we will have to do that." Nelsen, head of the Rural Electrification Administration from 1953 until he resigned in 1956 to She said she awakened her hus- Clifford Case (R-NJ) in seeking band but couldn't wake up the revision of Senate Rule 22. | make an unsuccessful race for gov- Ch l ld ":"' . , Under present procedure it' ernor of M »»nesota, succeeds Rep. First reports were that Kelly takes a twc-thirds v<Ae of the en-' Jose P h P " °' Hara «-Minn) who had gotten out of the burning tire Senate membership to limit dld not seek reelection, home then perished when he re ' debate . Under the ne / ™ l turned ma rescue attempt. Mrs.'debate could ultimately be imU- Kelly .said she didn't think her _ ed by a majority of the Senate husband had left the house. When ,' menibershin MPT-Hh,, ;^,^ !, she arrived at the Weinrich's she : membership. McCarthy joined other new senators for today's swear- said "he is trying to get the kids; ing-in ceremonies. up Drifter Out to Prove Mormon Statements OGDEN, Utah <AP> - Devere Baker, who skippert-d the raft 5 Take Seats On the House side, three new Minnesota House members take their seats. They are Ancher Nelsen (R), Joseph E. Karth (D), and Odin Langen (R). Weather Official U. s. Readings from THE HERALD Weather Site on Roof of Fire Station: High previous 24 hours — 21. Low previous 24 hours — -4. Reading at 8:30 a.m. — 9. General Weather — Overcast Tenrieraiures Recorded at TUB _____ ..... The new Minnesota lineup gives | HERALD ^BUILDING: TJHE GIRL ' WOfl-THE DOG — Ricky German shepherd dog whose ownership overshadowed a broken romance between American Air Force S/Sgt Otto Virgin and his former British girl friend was the object of their affections after a Lintlestone England court decision. Margaret Perkins, 24, who'contended she had paid most of the $14 purchase price of Ricky bade the dog farewell after the court awarded him to Virgin The Gl, native of Milwaukee who flew to England for the court case, joyfully hugged his pet after the favorable court action. (AP Photofax). the Republicans five House seats 1 Lebi IV when it drifted from Cpli- • and the Demc)crats f °u<-- This is.ajl P. M. fornia to Hawaii, sass he'll try T rSe ° f *« P«vious session. 2 P. M. another trip in I960 1 this time „ Lan « en ' wll ° Defeated Rep. Coya 3 P. M. ' KnuUou 'D-M"'"'. ^ the only Re- ! 4 P. M. pub!ican in congress to oust an in- .5 P. M. cumbent Democrat. : U P. M. Langen characterized the farm I from somewhere in the Ocean to Guatemala. Baker, of Petaluma, Calif. ' 22 22 22 21 18 17 . . N ants to prove statements in the problem as one of the most press- l A. M Book of Mormon that ancient Is-. ing for Congress to tackle, but 1 2 A. M. raehtes reached America by drift- said he had no specific farm le- 3 A M ° ing across the Pacific. He is a islation in mind at this time member of the Latter-day Saints Subscribes to Plans (Mormon) Church.. Langen also subscribed to Pr«- 4 A. M. 5 A. M. 6 A. M. TUESDAY 7 P. M. 8 P. M. 9P.M. 10 P. M. U P. M. 12 P. M. WEDNESDAY •••• 12 i -7 A. M. • • - • 13 I 8 A. M. • 14 I 9 A. M. • • W i 10 A- M. ••- 15IUA.M- « i W «QI» . 15 14 13 14 13 12 IS 16 H H ti m

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