Postville Herald from Postville, Iowa on February 13, 1946 · Page 7
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Postville Herald from Postville, Iowa · Page 7

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Postville, Iowa
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Wednesday, February 13, 1946
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Page 7
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1940. THE POSTVILLE HERALD. POSTVILLE. IOWA. PAGE SEVEN. FRANK VILLE (Continued 'from Page Six) Doris, Janice Brnlnard, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Hughes and Dnrlene, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Hughes and Darlenc, Mr. and Mrs. Evert Hughes and Linda. For the Herald'* llomemakers by Iowa State College Home Economists Little Things— ABOUT THE KITCHEN When it comes to whipping up puddings or cakes or biscuits it's the measuring cop, the egg beater, the mixing spoon that get the workout. Small equipment plays a major part in kitchen routine. It's the little things that count in a kitchen. llomemakers today have a lot of money tied up in, their ranges, refrigerators nnd sinks—equipment to make kitchen work n pleasure. Yet they're hampered in efficiency by the wrong type nickel and dime and dollar-fifty equipment—the small pieces that keep the kitchen running peacefully. No carpenter would start building Arthur Brandt was a dinner guest Friday at the Dean Knceskern home in Calmar. Mrs. Letta Padden of Postville is a visitor with her sister, Sarah Miller, this week. Walter Van Wey spent Sunday at his home here. He returned to Waterloo on Monday. Mr. and Mrs. LaVern Brown of Waterloo spent the week end at the Hans Stcgcn home. Mrs. Edna Bollman is spending a few days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Winger in Cedar Rapids. Mr. and Mrs. John Van Wey and family spent Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dean Cannon near Harmony, Minn. Mr. and Mrs. John Van Wey and two children returned Friday from several days visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Miller near Wnukon. A minister from Dubuque will again supply the Community Church pulpit here next Sunday morning, February 17. All arc welcome to attend, Rev. George of the Dubuque University had charge of church services here Sunday morning and was a dinner guest in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Brandt. Mr. and Mrs. Brown, formerly of Postville, moved into the Mrs. Anna Brouillct house on Sunday. Mr. Brown will be employed at the Harold Koth farm this year. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hcadington and baby of near Lansing, Mrs. Tena Headington of Waukon and Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Brandt were dinner guests on Monday at the Walter Pfister home. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd M. Billing of Chnrles City were week end guests at the Dan Higgins home. Mrs. Billing is the former Ellen Tecpc, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Teepe, and Mr. Billing is in the army air forces. Mrs. Edna Bollman will be hostess for the Willing Workers meeting to be held in the church rooms on Thursday afternoon of this week. Mrs. Elmer Christofferson will lead devotions and Mrs. Leo Birdsell has charge of the •ntertalnmont program. Everyone is •ordially invited. THEY UNDERSTAND US. The day before Thanksgiving, the |.klndcrgarten class of five year olds sat around the teacher. They were talking about the things for which they were thankful. Said Ray, "We arc sure thankful for our mothers. Sometimes they are mean to us, but doodness! They dotta be." Although Ray had a speech defect, he was a philosopher. Like Ray, many children of this age surprise us by their attitudes toward parental treatment. They can see through our motives. They know when our treatment is fair and deserved. When we are unfair, children also know it. They are aware of it In a confused sort of way, which they may not be able to put into words. Often they express their confusion by further naughtiness. It. pays to search our own minds be- orc punishing a child, for we may not have an honest reason for doing so. Children also forgive us as Ray forgave his mother. This fact should re- ieve the concern of those who fear to osc the affection of their children. JAL53UP.Y SAL 'WinltrWtotfitr isMkhtyRtughM WfienlStgh H to Snme, My Boss Sprays Me with CAH-PHO-SAl, ' AniPnmptlm' •• •< firevtmentStet .'yZ ^^y^J Your chicl<s can't do their bol with stuffy, congested nostrils You can help them to breathe easier with Dr. Salsbury's CAN-PHO-SAL Good Care In Poultry Pay* Let Us Help You WM. C. BAKKUM CHIROPRACTOR In Postville Mondays. Wednesdays and Saturdays [JOSEPH B. STEELE ATTORNEY-AT-LAW Office Over Abcrncthy's Store Telephone No. 240 DR. H. D. COLE Dentist Office Over Citizens State Rank a house with a cracker hammer handle and haggle-toothed saw for his handy equipment. Yet the homemaker, whose cooking techniques are as much of a skill, uses a broken- handled paring knife and badly bent mixing spoon. Stress Large Equipment. So much stress had been put on large kitchen equipment through advertising and magazine articles—perhaps that's why the homcmaker has overlooked the little things. Or per- h;"is she's so used to her battered equipment that she can't realize the "lift" that would be given to kitchen work by the tools of a kitchen craftsman. It takes planning. It lakes, a good number of hours with a pencil, paper and thought. Iowa State College home economists say the best way is to start the list from scratch. Never mind what you have in the cupboard now. Just start your planning as if you haven't a knife or a bowl in your cupboard. To give you a planning guide, here's a list of 12 equipment headings: 1) Kettles. 2t Skillets. 3) Baking utensils, 4 1 Mixing bowls, 5) Tea and coffee makers, <>> Measuring utensils, 7) Turners ispatulas and pancake turners, 8> Canning equipment, 9) Sink utensils, 10) Knives, spoons and forks, 11) Miscellaneous utensils, such as graters, mashers, beaters, cutters, rolling pin and can openers, 12) Tools, such as screw driver and hammer. }Dr. F. W. KIESAU, M.D. {Dr. M. F. KIESAU, M. D. Office Over Louis Schutte's Hours—Daily 0 to 12 and 1 to 5 Wed. and Sat.—7 to 8:30 p. m. Dr. C. M. Morgan VETERINARIAN Office Opposite Post Office Telephone No. 146-J LOUIS SCHUTTE WILLARD SCHUTTE Funeral Direetors and Embalmers Cut Flowers For All Occasions BURLING & PALAS ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW Office Over Postville State Bank Take Thought, is no hour job. Time This is no hour job. It takes some pondering, it takes cross-checking. When you're quite sure it's complete list every item you need in the kitchen and perhaps two or more of those you use most—then check off those pieces you already have, providing they're good, substantial ware. This list will come in handy soon, for good equipment is coming back on the market now. Aluminum pots and pans are appearing in hardware stores. Small electrical equipment is trickling back into appliance shops. Good steel is back for knives. Rubber— though mostly synthetic—is back for kitchen use. Yes, and useless Radgets are reflood ing the market. These are the pieces to guard against. Follow your planned equipment list. It should show — worthless buys. J. W. MYERS, M.D. Office Over Luhman & Sander* Telephones: Office 188-W Residence 188-X HEATING PLANT STRIKES. The big boiler furnishing heat for four busipess houses in Eldora took a bad time to develop leaks. During one of the coldest periods in the winter, the boiler started leaking causing some stores to be without heat. Stoves were the order of the day for some stores and apartments, while others were forced to close for two days. A new i boiler was finally located in Chicago and was rushed to Eldora. Dr. R. F. Schneider VETERINARIAN Phone No. 170 Postville, Iowa Day and Night Calls Answered Office In The Iris Theatre Building The finder of a toupee lost near In dependence will be amply rewarded. As a plane landed at Independence, one of the occupants stuck his head out the window and was "scalped" by the wind—his toupee blew off. The owner reports that the winter weather is rather hard on his head and besides he paid $65 for the hair. Monona and Postville Rendering Service We Pay Up To— $2.50 For Horses and Cows Permit 49 For Prompt Service Telephone POSTVILLE LOCKER SERVICE Telephone No. 888 Monotu Farmers Fttonr No, 101 FINDER REWARDED. Allamakee Rendering Works Call 555 Postville ALL DEAD ANIMALS LARGE OR SMALL We Pay Cash and Meet . All Competition WE WILL PAY FOR THE UALLI Four-County Hatchery Phone No. 234 Postville. Iowa AUCTION As I am moving to a smaller farm, I will sell the following described property at Public Auction on the Teeple farm in Ludlow township, four miles southwest of Waukon and 13 miles north of Postville, on the old Stage Road, on WEDNESDAY. FERITY 20 Commencing promptly at 12 o'clock noon: A Lunch Stand Will be on the Grounds. 31 Head of Cattle consisting of 11 Milch Cows; 10 yearling and 2-year-old Heifers and Steers; 7 Summer Calves; 3 Winter Calves; mostly Shorthorns; I Registered Shorthorn Bull, 2 years old. 2 Head Work Horses consisting of 1 Roan Mare, 5 years old, weight 1700 pounds; 1 iron gray Gelding, 7 years old, weight 1700 pounds. Both well broke and gentle. 29 Head of Sheep 28 Ewes and 1 Buck. Some of the ewes have lambs now. 28 Head of Hogs 14 Brood Sows due to farrow the last of April. Also 14 Fall Pigs. ABOUT 30 TONS GOOD HAY IN BARN Farm Machinery and Equipment Minnesota Grain Binder, 8-foot cut, used 5 seasons; McCormick-Deering Side Rake, four years old; Bloom Manure Spreader, 3 years old; Iron Wheel Truck Wagon; Wagon Box; Shoveling Board; 4-sec. Flexible Steel Drag, with folding draw bar, used one season; a Rosenthal Silo Filler, in good shape; a 2-wheel Trailer; Hinman Milking Machine, with two single units, used 3 years, pipeline for 19 cows; McCormick-Deering 10-in. burr Mill; 50-ft. Drive Belt; 60-gal. Feed Cooker; set of harness; Flynets; Coronado Cream Separator, with power attachment for electric motor; Maytag Washing Machine Motor in good shape; 19 Bee Hives with supers and 5 Swarms Bees; Kitchen Cabinet; Dropleaf Table; Round Oak Heating Stove, size 18; and other articles too numerous to mention. TERMS—Usual sale terms apply. Make arrangements with clerk before sale for credit. LLOYD S. SWENS0N, Prop. EATON WATERS, Auctioneer. POSTVILLE STATE BANK, Clerk

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