The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan on November 15, 1939 · Page 6
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The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan · Page 6

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Ludington, Michigan
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Wednesday, November 15, 1939
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Page 6
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THE DAILY NEWS—LUDINGTON, MICHIGAN. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15,1939. Evashevski To Be Back Saturday BEAVER BACK By Jack Sords ILL JE era Tom Harmon Absent From Practice Tuesday Due to Stomach Ailment ANN ARBOR, Nov. 15.—(/P)— [ Ray Roberts, trainer of the , Michigan football team, said today he expected Quarterback , Forest Evashevski and Tackle i Bill smith to be ready for the intersectlonal game with Pennsylvania at Philadelphia Saturday, i Return of Evashevski, an ex- i pert in diagnosing enemy defenses and a blocker and tackier of extraordinary ability, •would improve Michigan's chances of again hitting a winning stride. Tom Harmon, fleet halfback and sparkplug of Michigan's early season success, failed to put in an appearance at re- i hearsals Tuesday because of a stomach ailment, but was expected to be back in uniform j today. ) That the Wolverines have • another tough assignment in j the Quakers was apparent in ! scout reports of "Campbell • Dickson and Cliff Keen. | Both reported the Penn Elev- ! en, which has taken its bumps the same as Michigan this year, as "big as the Gophers" and "just as tough." A big weight advantage, both on the line and in the backfield, will favor the Quakers, who, like the Wolverines, started the season with wins and have failed to bounco back after being toppled from the undefeated ranks. Coach Fritz Chrisler, after viewing motion pictures of his team's two losses, sought improved blocking Tuesday in an offensive drill and outlined the defense) he expects Penn to use. Few of the first-string players participated in the contact work.' Quaker plays go on display today. 'Passing Paul Christman' Is Target of Sooner Team NORMAN, Okla., Nov. 15.—'the Tigers. -The University of Okla- . Outside of a natural desire to : Statement Is Made as Big Ten Prepares for Games Saturday | CHICAGO, Nov. 15.—</P)— I Jay Berwanger, the University of" Chicago's last all-America 1 football player, blames the 'alumni for the schol's pitifully I weak showing on the gridiron in recent years. "We have scholarships to jgive,'' says Jay, "and iobs such las waiting on tables, bell-ring- iing. mowing lawns and watering tennis courts to give just .like anyone else, if the boys , will come and get them. I "It's up to the alumni to do 'what other alumni do and help i bring the boys in. Our alum- ini aren't on the job. i "The goal of President Rob- •ert Hutchins is to have the ; greatest educational institution ;in the world, and he isn't going ; to let football stand in the i way. But I think we can ihave a good football team and ;also achieve that goal." | Berwanger now aids in coach| ing the Freshmen as a part;time job. | He is the authority for much i of the praise handed out about this year's yearling team. He has said the Frosh can beat ithe Varsity now and should .add great strength to the ; Maroons next fall. The Var- jsity now has won pne of six '.games, scoring 12 points to 262 'for their foes. I Foxy Bob Zuppke is moaning 'about Illinois' chances of vic- ^ory Saturday against Ohio i State, Big Ten leader and top! heavy choice to win undisput- 'ed possession of the title. j Zuppke just isn't "in" when I you begin talking in terms of i upsetting Ohio Sltate. An up- jset, in his book, is when a iteam given absolutely no i chance to win does just that j Says Zuppke: "Our boys are in terrible ;OP)—Trie University of Okla- . Outside of a natural desire to ' u ur boys are in terrible jhoma eleven appears to be beat their old Big Six rivals shape. Three of them, Quar- I somewhat nettled over the rash and progress one week nearer a terback Ralph Ehni, Guard of publicity given passing Paul,New Year's day bowl game of ; Wes . Martin and Center Bill i Christman of Missouri. This some sort, the Sooners have iLenich, haven't even dressed -touch of displeasure is likely another reason for wanting to' tm ' s week. We don't have ito prove embarrassing to foot-.knock Christman's ears down, [enough good reserves." i ball's latest glamor boy when .They think they have two 1 Which is true, but Zuppke i these two outstanding teams backs better than the Missour- !f£ * iled to mention that four of. 'meet Saturday at Columbia. ian, and they want proper ms first stringers played the ' Coach Tom Stidham has lock- recognition when the all-Amer- : ful * 60 minutes in the last j ,ed the gates on his big, unde- ica pickers start picking. i three games, two of which the jfeated Sooners. Cadets with Coach Stidham, himself, is | IIlini w °n. i j polished rifles are walking: sen- authority for the statement Iowa is grooming an aerial „. ' , _ , . . , , try on the practice fielcT. and that taot'h Bervl Clark and Bob at tack for the Minnesota test umy two Industrial league the impression around •'here is Seymour arc greater backs than 'Saturday . . . Nile Kinnick ace matches were bowled at Smith's that a lot of new and unusual Christman. and his publicity i back - has been in the role of alleys^ Tuesday night, _ Hansen;misery is being prepared for [department supplies figures i r ? c ? iver in practice with Ed and Peterson's Auto Sales trim- ] ming the Camera Shop twice' and Willoughby taking two from the third-place Eagle squad. Willoughby's victory came in the nature of a surprise. Floundering in the cellar position, the Willoughby five, with the, aid of a 63 pin handicap, ( dropped the opener but copped * SHJIMRDGKS GOOD HE • uiijui UJICIIL ftujjput.'.b ngures ,-~"^-"-* in practice with Ed Uhat threaten to bear him out, McLain and Floyd Dean the ! Ak;o, while on the subject the .fossers . . . Bob Peterson has rnT .Sooner mentor .said there was- '° een promoted to left half- rL! in't a finer end in the nation iback on tnc Wisconsin Varsity JLU \ ithan his Fran!:' Ivy. but he ;.-. • Purdue, the Badgers' foe consented not to press the tnis week, has lost Carl Ver- point when reminded that ,P lank - Senior guard, for the there were, after all, only 11 '! a - st : tw o games because of in- vacancies on the average" all-; Junes • • • tne Boilermakers America team. a . re stressing blocking in prac- Clark, who calls sienals for i tlcT ® J, ' l ,,. . • - - - ' Indiana, which owns a neat Eagle team, turned in high j returning lettermen, including'" ycia s<= -Ji p^s completions ,r qrn p u^h^y/n^vV"^™—c. *T count of the evening, spilling! three regulars are included in i than Christman, now that:??,™ wairf^ • I s >? J?u ' ' •• 534 pins. S. Meyers, a teammate,! a group of over two dozen | we're getting involved in this '.^-^ nf V ora £H, o: , Northwestern; turned in 529, second high i hopefuls who have been work- ! inter-conference feud. Also he .p,,r ri ,7p L ..„* « yst , defe ^ b .y I count of the evening. Inaddi-'ing out the past two weeks;£ as outrun and outkicked the ! nn^hf P fL " ev f r . tllo ught it! tion to rolling high series, Knebl I under the watchful eyes of! bo y h e will try to outshine i £30 vu 'L s0 f™m J^™™ gau ^ ! toppled 210 in the curtain Coaches Lawrence and Eddie j Saturday., • blSc^t™ 1T £TO?? ™S i game Barber - raiser for match single honors. Prehn. lead-off man, was 'two weeks remaining in which a " average of .640, while outstanding for Willoughby's. ' to get their squad iii shape for i Christman has sailed 105 and He turned in a 21 the ener i t. ean's connected with 53 for a mark - Clark, a Senior, has tnrown ' i The parochial coaches have j 50 passes and completed 32 for 'two weeks remaining in which I a " average of .640, while i not score.' uuLOkauunig lur wiiiougn'oy s.' 10 gei ineir squau in snape lor ;^"* ^m^i nu.^> saueu iuo tuiu He turned in a 521 series, high;the opener against St. Jean's connected with 53 for a mark j for his team, and a 223 single 1 of Muskegon, Nov. 28 at Mus- ! °f - 514 - The Missouri ace has pfiTr>f> D-nnH on rm IT Vi f/->T- o-,,n_!nkpcm piled ur> the greater varrlnp-p game, good enough for e ve-|o k egn. ning's honors. Ralph Tower,; Regulars returning, uiuimu . member of the Eagles' aggrega- [whom this year's edition of the ! tion, was the only other kegler • Shamrocks will be built, Capt. i in t,rlf* m£lfY»n t.n t.nr\ fV*a ^nn'.TQmoc "Minot: rnicirH' Js.mGS i in the match to top the "500' James Hines, guard; Hansen and Peterson climbed' for ward. Barber is temporar- up into fourth place with its; u y lost to the squad, having; two wins over the Camera Shop • pulled a ligament at a recent] After dropping the first by 49! practice session. How long- he! pins; the winners came iback to I wl11 be out is n °t definitely i win the second handily and the kno ^ vn bu t he is not expected j third toy a narrow two-Bin ! to J? e m shape for the opener. margin. Harold Holmes, first the Camera Shop, r ly 500 score in the 200 game was also game, Evans was for Hansen and [piled up the greater yardage, around' 73 ? to Clai 'k's 366, but Coach _ .. ; Rtidhnm said that was only his team generated power on the ground _. didn't need to pass much. narrow' two-pin ^ - retu ' rning : ' lette ' rrnen) f fighting for first team berths ^ U1 I this year, are George Sarres, 95" 'John Bennett, Charles Horacek, t . • tils ! Myron Delbarker and Bill Nel-i MICHIGAN SPORT BRIEFS HOCKEY (By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS) TUESDAY'S RESULTS National League Detroit 4, New York Americans 2 Boston 3. Chlcfigo 1 (overtime) International-American League Cleveland 5. Springfield 4 (overtime! American Association St. Paul I. Minneapolis 3. TONIGHT'S SCHEDULE National League . No games. International-American League Providence at Cleveland. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia. New Haven at Syracuse. American Association St. Louis at Minneapolis. Tuls.i at Omaha. 488. WILLOUGHBY (2) - experience. Delbarker, Sarres and Nelson, who ' ' 146 112 146 ear filled ard Wayunlver yerlngs here ! tlons ' Wl11 Probably be shifted next Monday. The Titan first to forward, Coach Lawrence year men have beaten the 1,, -------- , . . ... . !„. , WRESTLING (By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS) MINNEAPOLIS — Bronko Nagurski 5, International Falls, Minn., threw ; Den Mclntyre. 224. OttervUIe, Mo. 19-06 r Vu 11 * — ~-.-v.viv x , v-oiiiiia.il i WUKUKSTER, Mass. — Steve (Crusher) lOOLDall team Will Seek its third Casey. 225, Ireland, defeated Jim Wright straight victory aeainst the •• 235 ' Texas . two straight fails. L.u.u.y a b aiiioU U1L . Curly Donchin. 189, «Q 63 63 63— 189 10 , - 419 Barber declared. we ' re short of "At present 790 880 806—2476 F.O.E. (1) T « i o ---- ;r«— '^ . p- J. Heglund . . 156 145 142— 443 i ing material coming un we 1W Tf\ f+\m*,m\rl 1 O A -tCf\ t An A l-l f n1«n..1.1 __ ti_ 1__ i . •*. positions having lost through graduation such men as Bob Betka. Garth Belland and Harold Mask ey. But with promis- E. Jankowski 169 159 147— 475 157 196 176— 529 166 168 182— 516 210 175 149— 534 8. Myers Tower J, 858 843 796—2497 HANSEN & PETERSON (2) • ns 139193156—488 oenberger 169 174 125— 468 • .... 125 160 122— 407 .... 127 121 167— 415 .... 159 165 154— 428 shouldn't have too much trouble finding capable replacements," he added. Coach Lawrence Barber explained that the entire reserve team of last year was back and included several promising looking youngsters. He mentioned Dutch. Greenwald, Bill isi. Poland, two of three rails. pBoby w g? ner - . 220 ' Strongberg. Western State and Normal Frosh. Wayne's team! INDIANAPOLIS —Danno o'Mahoney, 718 813 724—2256 CAMERA SHOP (1) ttes .. 200 164 162— 526 iardson 101 139 160— 400 172 135 135— 442 186 171 139— 476 118 111 112— 338 H 14 14— 42 768 734 722—2224 and the Michigan Normal Freshman. KALAMAZOO, Nov. 15.—(XP)— The Western State Teachers' college football team will defend itself against one of the outstanding passers of the country in the game with Ohio University here Saturday. The ny aerial artist is Dan Dis, quarterback of the Bob- rouchncs.s after losing first fall). BOXING (Bv THE ASSOCIATED PRESS) WHITE PLAINS. N. Y.—Larry Kellum, ]C2'.i. Plenty wood, Mont., and Ralph Tiovtlli. 160'/4, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., drew. (G). NEW YORK—Lenny Manolnl, 133'i, YoungHtown, O., stopped Jimmy Lancaster. 131':,. Wilmington, Del., (7). LOS ANGELES—Richard Polite, 120",!,, New Orleans, knocked out Gene Espiti- "•(•a. 129, Philippines, (4). CORPUS CHKISTI, Tex.—Kid Hermo- Inter-League Play Latest Baseball Is Plan spins most of its offensive plays from a single wingback forma- 'tion. Searches for History of LaSalle School NEW YORK, Nov. 15.—(#>)— The trend toward inter-league play in the major leagues, gradually picking up momentum like a dog with a can tied to its tail, was given a new push today by a suggestion which met with the approval of several of baseball's more influential citizens. The sponsor of this plan, a well-known official of the national pastime, asked that his name be not mentioned. But you got the idea that it might be brought up at next month's major league meetings, along with the suggestions of Larry MacPhail, for eight "world series" right down the line between the two loops, and Gerry Nugent, for a Shaughnessy playoff in the big leagues. . The new plan goes something like this: "1. Cut the regular season play down to where each team. the regular schedules in five years. The Athletics and Browns, although not contacted on the prposal, can't help but take to it, like a kid to a lollipop. Just think, they'd trade four games with the Yankees lor four with the Phillies or Boston Bees. Will Hold First Practice Today in Preparation for Indiana Saturday EAST LANSING, Nov. 15.— (/P) —Michigan State's defeat- instead of meeting every other j weary football warriors return- team in its own lelgue 22 times |. ed * rom the west coast today -- - - - , rs !to the campus roar: "Win or at 'lose, you're ours." j The student body, joined by many townspeople, prepared a formal welcome at the depot in anticipation of the team's arrival at 3:25 p. m. The iubi- ilation was to be short-lived, on in only 18 games—nine home and nine away. 2. Then each team in each league would play foiu games with every team in the other league. \ hon 1PT , he H Se t f »n r IhrlfV^' 0 ?H however, for the Spartans were home and two abroad—-would ril]p ..., Vlimh v,irk into their count in the pennantstandings, J^foSis aSn after "heir^re- somewhat on the order of the j tur to drill for Indiana , get- National Professional Football l tin their first real pracbti ce and Hockey leagues. j ln a week In that way/' explained the | The Spartans conceded that sponsor, you d have some true j the H oosiers were an up and idea of just how much better down tea m this season, but your pennant winning clubs are , they also noted against whom than the other clubs in both!Indiana had been up or down, loops These inter-league games ! Coach Alvin "Bo" McMillan's could be put on late in August,,team tied Nebraska 7 to 7, just when the interest of fans is lost a butty 32 to 29 game to beginning to fall off. and would Iowa, beat Wisconsin 14 to 0, be a. definite shot in the arm to dropped to Ohio State 24 to 0, the gate." beat Illinois, the bane of Mich- Ford Frick. the National igan, 7 to 6, and last week let league's president, unofficially !Fordham take a 13 to 0 victory. thought the idea a good one. '• Coach Charley Bachnxan has "At least,''he pointed out, "it's ; an idea of what McMillan will a progressive step. And baseball; spring, because the Indiana must keep on showing progress'coach .previously brought teams all the time, just like a business, to East Lansing under the Kan"The trend is definitely toward sas State banners. inter-league play, sooner or McMillan's teams, always later." loaded with deceptive strategy, Another National leaguer, lis- have a primary threat this fall tening in, voiced the opinion that .in Left Halfback Hal Hursh, a inter-league battling will be on i dangerous passer. The team LASALLE ' DISTRICT.—June Callesen of LaSalle district has been searching for her schools' history and finds the first school was called Finders' school and •was located on land now owned by Thomas Kenny. It was later moved, torn down and rebuilt. It was renamed for Frank LaSalle, who owned and operated a small store on the corner opposite the school. Frank LaSalle was a great hunter and trapper and loved to swap yarns with his customers. One of the first teachers was Miss Dora Wilkinson. The school term was only for three months. Melvin Russell, one of the early teachers, planted the maple trees now growing around the building. Some of the children attending the school 40 years ago were the Hans Nicklesens, the Larsens and the Peter Petersons. Mr. and Mrs. John Treml and daughter, Rose, were Sunday visitors, Nov. 12, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Callesen. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Helminiak and children were Sunday evening guests, Nov. 12, at the Edward Wahr home. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Petzak and daughter, Louise, were Sunday afternoon guests, Nov. 12, at the Clarence Callesen home. Mr. and Mrs. J. Nicklesen wore Sunday evening guests, Nov. 12, of Mr. and Mrs. William Qiuide. Fire destroyed the barn and all its contents, except the cattle, on the George Olson farm in Grant township early Monday, Nov. 13. j Priceless Script YOUR PRESCRIPTION may be your passport from death to life. . . We compoucl prescriptions with scientific care, using only the finest of • chemicals and pharmaceuticals. See Your Doctor Regularly! LEWIS DRUG STORE i WANGEN BLDG. Make a note on your calendar, tie a string around your finger or tell someone in your family to remind you—it's important—that you send in the coupon today. As an old or new subscriber you are entitled to enormous savings on The Ludington Daily News and your favorite maga- /ines. Reading pleasure for a whole year! Look over these bargain offers ... select your favorite ... aiid hand the coupon to your Postman with your remittance. But do it now! LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS, 1 yr. and your choice of Any Three Magazines ALL FOUIl $3-90 True Komanccs 1 Yr.: American Girl 8 Mo. American Boy 8 Mo. American Poultry Journal 2 Yr.i Breeder's Gazette 2 Yr. Christian Herald 6 Mo.! Household Magazine ..2 Yr. Modern Romances 1 Yr.; MrCall's Magazine 1 Yr.; Open Koad (Boys) 1 Yr. Movie Mirror 1 Yr.' Sports Afield 1 Yr.; Modern Screen 1 Yr. Silver Screen 1 Yr. Poultry Tribune 2 Yr. National Livestock Producer 2 Yr. Parents' Magazine 6 Mos. True Experiences 1 Yr. Woman's World 2 Yr. Farm Journal and Farmer's Wife 2 Yr. Capper's Farmer 2 Yr. Country Home 2 Yr. LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS, 1 yr. and any Three Magazines AM, FOUR American Poultry Journal 1 Yr. American Fruit Grower ,1 Yr. Breeder's Gazette • 2 Yr. Clovcrleaf Review 1 Yr. Country Home 2 Yr. Home Arts Needlecraft, 1 Yr. Farm Journal and Farmer's Wife 2 Yr. Household Magazine ...1 Yr. Capper's Farmer 1 Yr. Leghorn World 1 Yr. Mother's Home Life ....I Yr. Successful Farming ...1 Yr. Pathfinder (Wkly.). 26 Issues Plymouth Rock Mthly., 1 Yr. Poultry Tribune 1 Yr. Rhode Island Red Journal 1 Yr. National Livestock Producer 1 Yr. Woman's World 1 Yr. tkmed Dutch? Greenwald, Bill {£"«, Quarterback of the Bob- ^tJ^XgS, ffiu Md Hermo- Hines, Smith, Sellner. Lavich ' wno nas completed 501 siiio. 149. Mexico city, outpointed Jim- Cartier and Neumann 'tosses so far this season. West- l m y Fletcher, 1355, Houston, Tex., no). D nn «. .... _ "«***"• . n,.« l-,r,r. ,.,,.„ 4i - ,.., NEW YORK—Joev lannnttn. 19.RI', • . c . , / Because of a new inter- ' ern has won three and lost scholastic rulins:. St. Simon's ! four B am es to date, last year a Class C team, will j — this year compete as a Class I ALBION, Nov. 15.—(#>)—For D outfit. The new ruling j tn e second straight year IllKPn t.nP on w^llvMnM-t- *: ~ T^/iii ol/^ Tin v« nn « nv . *-«:i i. - * . enrollment figure .. . , Pa., has contributed the , ., necessary to attain Class C I "most valuable player" to the class If Icatlon from 100 to 125. Albion college football team. ' ' . v£? J m * nt ° f st - Simon's this year is in the neighborhood of . This year's squad has selected Walter Ptak, a Junior guard, for YORK—Joey lannotto,' 126'/2, New Haven, Conn., outpointed Curly St. Angelo, 124, New York, (B). PHILADELPHIA — Jackie Sheppard, 133, Philadelphia, outpointed Lou Fortuna. 138, Philadelphia, (6). NEW BEDFORD, Mass.—Salvatore Bartolo, 120, Boston, outpointed Duaty Brown, 129, Pall River, Mass. WILKES BARRE, Pa.—Tony Cisco, 162, Norrlwtown, Pa., outpointed Tarzan Roy, 163, Scranton, Pa., (10). JERSEY CITY, N. J.—Irish Eddie Brink. 141, New York, outpointed Pec Wee Bonlto, 14'!, Bayonne, N. J., (8). ATLANTA—Kenny LaSulle, 145%. Atlanta, outpointed Carl Dell, 145Vi, New .York, (10). CLUB NO. 154 THE DAILY NEWS 1 Yr. Liberty 52 Issues Mather's Horn:; Life 1 Yr. Farm Journal and. Farmer's Wife 1 Yr. VALUE $5.50 ALL FOUR $3-75 YOU SAVE $1.75 THIS NEWSPAPER CD ILOCAL Mm W<0«D> WMEKffiWS LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS, 1 year and Two Magazines from Group A--One Magazine from Group B ALL FOUR Group A—Select Two Magazines True Romances i Yr. Sports Afield i Yr. American Boy 8 Mo. American Girl 8 Mo. Christian Herald c Mo. McCall's Magazine Yr. Movie Mirror Yr, Open Road (Boys) yr. Parents' Magazine G Mo. Modern Romances Yr, Modern Screen Yr. Woman's World z Yr. Household Magazine 2 Yr. Silver Screen j Yr. True Experiences i Yr. Pathfinder (Weekly) i Yr. Group B—Select One Magazine American Poultry Journal 1 Yr. Cloverlcaf Review 1 Yr. Country Home 2 Yr. Pathfinder (Weekly) 26 Issues I I Farm Journal and Farmer's 1 ' Wife 2 Yr. Household Magazine 1 Yr. Mother's Home Life 1 Yr. poultry Tribune 1 Yr. Successful Farming 1 Yr. Woman's World 1 Yr. Leghorn World 1 Yr. r-nnnor 1 '.- fprmrr 1 Yr. Breeder's Gazette 2 Yr, National Livestock Producer ..1 Yr. This sensational idub subscription offer is good for NEW or RENEWAL subscriptions to THE LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS going to MAIL SUBSCRIBERS in Mason, Occana, Lake or Manistee counties. If you are already taking the paper your subscription will be extended for one - year from the expiration date. The same is true if you are taking any of the magazines already. THE LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS LUDINGTON, MICHIGAN. Gentlemon: I encloso $ IMofisu KOIH! me Offer No. or magazines cliecked. Name • St. orK.F.D. Town State

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