The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota on January 3, 1959 · Page 18
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The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota · Page 18

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Austin, Minnesota
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Saturday, January 3, 1959
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Page 18
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4-AUSTIN (Minn.) HERALD, SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1959 Network Television Thursday, January 8 (C) Means ^fogrom is in Color 6/03 a.m. I—David Stont 6:30 a.m. 4, 10—Condntntal Clou- room 7:00 a.m. 4—Slcgtrcid i, 10— today 7:45 a.m. 4 —Chrlitmai Show 8:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. 1, 4—Copt. Kangaroo 8:45 a.m. 1 N«wi 9:00 a.m X 4— tot Lore or Money S, 10—Oougn Rt MI 9:30 a.m. 3, 4 —Godfrey >. 10— iitoturc Hunt 10:00 a.m. 3, 4, t —I Lovo Lucy 5, 10—Price Is Right 10:13 a.m. I—Garr> Moore 10:30 a.m. 3, S—Top Dollar 4—N«wi 3, 10—Concentration 6—Quiz a Catholic 11:00 a.m. J, «. 8—Love of Life 5, 10—Tic Tac Dough 11:30 a.m. J, 4, 8—Search 5, 10—Could Be You t—Music Bingo 11:45 a.m. 3, 4 Guiding Light 6—Peter Hayes I—Film Review 72-00 m 3. 4, 5, S, 10-Ncw>, Weather 12:20 p.m. 5—Treasure Chest 12:30 p.m. 3, 4—As World Turn* 6—Play Hunch I—Mist Brookl 10—Brevities 1.-00 p.m 3, 4, &—Jimmy Dean 5, 10—Truth or Cons*, ...quinces (C) 6—Liberate 1:30 p.m. 3, (—House Party 4—Lmklcfter 5, JO—Haggis Boggft (C) 6—News Weather, Clubs 1:40 p.m 6 —Matinee 3. 8—Big Pavoft 4—Msrriom Show 5, 10—Today Tours 6—Day in Court 2/50 p.m. 3, 4, 8—Verdict Your* 5, 10—From These Roots 6—Pendulum 3:00 p.m. 3. 4, »—Brighter Day 5, 10—Queen for Day 6—Bear Clock 3:30 p.m. 3, 4. 8—Edge at Night 5, 10—County Fair *—Who Do »ou J>u«l 4:00 p.m. 3—Valu Show 5—Margie £—American Bandstand 10—What's New 4:30 p.m. S—Last of Mohicans 10—Forest Frontiers 5:00 p.m. 3—Huckleberry Hound 4—Superman 5—Robin Hood 6—Texas Rangers 10— Jet Jackson 5:30 p.m. 4 —Popevr 6—Disney Adventure Time 8—"IddiM Hour 10—Huckleberry Hound 5:45 p.m. 5—News 10—Looncy Turwj 6:00 p.m 3, 4, 5, 8, 10—Newt, Wtafhoi Sport! 6—Weather 6:15 p.m. fr—Don Goddard 10—NBC News 6:20 pm, 5—You Stiouio ilnow 6:30 p.m. 3—Annie Oakley 4 —I Love Lucy 5, 10—Jefferson Drum 6—Leave it to Beaver 8—Disney Presents 7/00 p.m 3, 4—Dsccmbw BrM* 5—Ed Wynn 6—Zorro 10—S«io Hunt 7/30 p.m. 3, 4 —Derringer 5, 10—Could Bo Yo« 8—Got Secret 6—Rea> Metoyj 8:00 p.m. 3, 4 —Zone Grey S— Bcfrnd Closed Doors 6—Pat Boon* 8—Music 10—Rescue 8 8:30 p.m. 3, 4, 8—Playhouse 90 (C) 5, 10—Ernie Ford 6—Rough Riders 9.-00 p.m. 5, 10—Bet Your Lift 6—Man Wilhrm' fl-rn 9/30 p.m. S—Masquerade Party (C) £—Judge Bean 10—U. S. Marshal JO/00 p.m. 3. 4. 5, 6, 8, 10— Newi, Weethei Sports 10:15 p.m. 6—John Daly IU:20 D.m. 8—This Is Your Life 10:30 p.m. 3—Heart of City 4—Mickey Spillan* 5—Ten-Four 6—Hour of Stan 10—Jack Poor Show 11:00 p.m. 4 —Play Houso S—Jack Paar 12:00 m 5—News 'BLONDE DESTROYER' Cindy Robbins Getting Champagne Build-up HER NAME'S MCCARTHY —Nobu McCarthy (above), a fetching Japanese actress with an Irish name, almost lost her first good film role because she looked too Japanese. She auditioned for the role of Jerry Lewis' love interest in Geisha Boy" wearing a Japanese kimono. The producers frowned, but when she returned later in sleek American clothes she got ihe part. She's married to David McCarthy, an American Gl she met in Tokyo. (AP Photofax) HOLLYWOOD (AP) — Cindy Robbins, a blonde destroyer, is the first young actress ever to be launched with champagne. How that came about can best be told by a backstage look at the publicity buildup given a potential star. Cindy, barely 21, has a bubbling personality. That alone should give a good publicity man apeg. But her first picture, "This Earth Is Mine," is laid in the vineyards of a great California wine making family. She was a natural for a champagne build-up. Now she is known as "the champagne blonde." Champagne by DECREE Bud Westmore, Universal-International make-up chief, might have shampooed her hair with any of the standard preparations. But the publicity department decreed it should be champagne. "Actually,". sas Westmore, "it does wonders for her hair and I can recommend it to anyone who can afford it." Next the studio ordered her to appear in public wearing champagne colored dresses and driving a champagne colored convertible. Has No Choice If she orders a cocktail at a cafe, it must be champagne. Cindy, even without champagne, has all the attributes for stardom, including talent and years of experience. She's an offbeat charac- Mulligan Says Beat Generation Off Key By HUGH MULLIGAN (AP NewsfeaCures Writer) Jazzman Gerry Mulligan is the Idol of the Beat Generation, but with his crew cut hair, neat business suit and faultless grammar devoid of bop-talk, he nc-t'.-.er looks, Bounds nor feels the part. "I have never identified my•elf with the beats," he insisted over a plate of scram':'.sd eggs in a midtown restaurant. "They want to minimize all emotional responses to life, which to me is the next thing to being deed. We went through all that in the '40s, the business of being cool and unemotional. Not For Him "I can't be one of the beats because I have some enthusiasm for life. . ." He could have said "I Want to Live," but that might have constituted a plug for his new United Artists album, from the Susan Hayward picture of the same name. The picture concerns itself with the fate of Barbara Graham, a real life beat-type who went to the gas chamber in California at a time when Mulligan was living and playing on the West Coast. His jazz combo, with Shelly Manne on drums, Art Farmer on trumpet, Pete Jolly on piano, Frr.^ Rosolino on trombone, Bud Shank on alto sax and Gerry on baritone sax, plays a large part in developing her film characterization through Johnny Mandel's haunting score. A Movie 'First' It is probably the first time that jazz has played an integral part in a screen portrayal, not just as background but as a means of advancing the plot and delineating the character of the heroine. The problem was complicated by the fact that Gerry and his excellent combo saw only clips from the picture at the time of the recording session and none in which Miss Hayward, playing WHAT'S IN A NAME? — Probably the most improbable name for a romantic young actor rapidly rising to stardom is—Smith. But Roger Smith is glad he has it f, er ,, acst . u °'° tned \° change it to something tricky— like Smith Rogers." Actress Victoria Shaw liked just plain Smith ' so much she married the guy so she could have it, too. They have a little Smith' named Tracey. Barbara Graham, was featured. "We had a pretty good idea of what was supposed to be happening at the time, as in the Frisco club sequence and Barbara's theme, but we had to employ imagination and fit ourselves into the mood, just like the actors, to recreate the erratic quality of jazz as it was played in the MOs," says Gerry in recalling the recording sessions. She Loved Jazz In the film, Barbara is shown as a Gerry Mulligan fan who collects "all his records" and listens to him eagerly on radio. "I'm not sure," he says, "whether the real Barbara Graham was a Mulligan fan or not. I was out there at the time and had recorded several albums, but more probably she had someone like Charlie Parker as idol. All we know is that she was a jazz fan and that it was one of the few stabilizing factors in her unhappy life." Whether Barbara was or wasn't a Mulligan fan, the theme music from her screen portrayal as performed by the Mulligan combo Is among the finest to come along in years, sensitively written and sensitively performed. The first movie to use a jazz score for the entire musical background was "No Sun in Venice," a French film with a score by John Lewis and played by his Modern Jazz Quartet. Probably the most inventive of the modern jazz men, Lewis shows new depth and brilliance as a composer in "European Windows," his new RCA Victor album. Glenn Miller has had numerous revivals .on records, but there Is always room for another good one. Twentieth Century Fox, a newcomer in the recording field, turns the trick in "Glenn Miller and His Orchestra," a two-record album featuring the original orchestra in original movie sound tracks. Billy Graham Guest of Paar Tuesday The Rev. Billy Graham and Dorothy Sarnoff will join regular guests Genevieve and Cliff (Charlie Weaver) Arquette on Tuesday's Jack Paar Show. Beginning Monday the Paar show will be taped. The actual will start three hours earlier than usual and the tape will be shown at the customary time throughout the country. Collectors of musical nostalgia will also find warm satisfaction in Warner Brothers' "They Sold 20 Million," an album of 12 of the greatest all-time song hits. Dynamation New Process in Film Here Dynamation, a new process In movie making, is seen for the first time, in the "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad," which starts at the Sterling Wednesday. It is a photographic ' process which combines a live background, in color, with a 3-dimensional animated figure in combination with flesh and bone actors. The process brings to vibrant life the magical fantasy of the Arabian Nights stories In the film which stars Kerwin Mathews and Kathryn Grant. Dynamation, as opposed to "special effects" or simple "animation," means that the filmed process shots used for trick camera effects, are finally able to be treated in color. In the former process, even an untutored eye could defect where an actor left off and a scale model in animation took over. In the new film process, only the most practised eye can distinguish between the real and the make-bilieve. Charles H. Schneer experimented for five years, filming thousands upon thousands feet of film, before perfecting the process. To the layman, the word, "animation" suggests drawing screen cartoons. But, in Dynamation the animate and inanimate are combined with real people. For example, there is a sequence in "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad' where star Kerwin Mathews, who plays sin- bad, is called upon to duel with a skeleton. Projected on a screen, it is an amazing sequence that can only thrill and mystify audiences. The blue-backing system, combined with Dynamation, is the reverse of process photography. The performer in question crosses in front of a blue-br? v ing with as many as 50 arc lamps and reacts — to nothing. In straight process photography, the actor watches what is being projected on the screen and he is able to react sufficiently to the image projected. ter, somewhat reminiscent of Shirley MacLaine. Physically, she's an American Bardot. Although this is her first picture—and her part is a key one with Jean Simmons and Rock Hudson—she has been preparing for it since she was 8. Dancer at 9 That's when her family moved from Hammond, La. to nearby Glendale. At nine she was dancing in Greek theatre productions; at 11, a featured dancer with Ken Murray's original "Blackouts" and as a teen-ager, a veteran performer on television and on Broadway. She was with Shirley Booth for 10 months in "By the Beautiful Sea." Now she's making screen love to Rock Hudson. The latter is her greatest thrill. "When I was at Glendale High," she confesses, "I was president of the Rock Hudson fan club." So far she hasn't told Hudson of this bobby-sox infatuation. "I also was president of the Farley Grariger fan club too," she adds. "And you know actors." Darin Says Parents Miss Boat With Kids Rock and roll idol Bobby Darin has tagged the youngsters of today "the misunderstood generation." The young singer who has recorded such hits as "Splisn Splash" and "Queen of the Hop" says: "The kids of today are the results of the war years when split families were at their height. "Before the war," he adds, "America was a country of families, but today's mothers and fathers are working and the children are misunderstood. "The movies and TV make us out to be either switch-blade guys or else we're riding around in hot rods cut down from Jaguars." Bobby says that a better home life and more understanding parents is all today's high schoolers need. Woterfield May End Coaching Career Jane Russell's husband Bob Waterfield may return as full-time boss of Russfield movie company owned by Waterfields soon. The former Los Angeles Ram football star spent last year on the Ram coaching staff, but is thinking of giving up football. Darin YOUR COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER . . » GENERAL REPAIR • MOTOR TUNE-UP • WHEEL BALANCING • BRAKE REPAIRS « OVERHAULING o SHELLUBRICATION • CAR WASH • BATTERIES • TIRES • SHELL TCP GASOLINE See George or Chet of {STERLING SHELL MOTORS DJAl HE 3.3625 1328 W. Oeklond - Au«ti»

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