Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on November 18, 1970 · Page 84
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Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 84

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Carroll, Iowa
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Wednesday, November 18, 1970
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Page 84
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Christmas is Just Another Day for Ivan By MICHAEL JOHNSON (Associated Press Writer) MOSCOW, U.S.S.R. (AP) Christmas in Moscow is just another working day — but the gaily decorated streets and the holiday mood make it seem almost as cheerful as Christmas in the west. The Kremlin calendar takes no note of Christ's birthday, and Russians who want to celebrate it must organize their festivities outside of working hours. Thousands of Soviet Baptists, Catholics, and other Christians still observe Dec. 25 as Christmas quietly in their homes and 2 Times FferoM, Crrt .ll, I.. | ^W&*^*<*****<#*>V****W Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1970 « ' in their churches. w if 2 fori SALE HOOVEI CONVERTIBLE It Beats, as it Sweeps, as it Cleans Upright Vacuum Recommended by Carpet Experts HOOVER CONSTELLATION The canister that offers more of what you want in a cleaner. Tank Type —Best for Above the Floor Cleaning Officially, however, Christmas y doesn't exist. ^ The occasion seems festive $ nevertheless because official I K Moscow is getting ready for the New Year's observance, the Communist substitue for Christmas. Big, fattening dinners, gift exchanges and monumental drinking bouts are typical features of the New Year parties. Moscow buids up to the event through most of December. The streets are hung with colored lights and candy canes almost identical to the t r a d i t i o n a 1 trappings of the holiday as celebrated in the United States. The passing visitor would hardly notice the difference in atmosphere between commiuiist- atheist Moscow and the capitalist Christian West at this time of year. Dial a Prayer During Holiday in m a s ft i5 y The Dial-a-Prayer project that provides re* corded inspirational messages during the Christie mas season will again be jointly sponsored by the j| g Carroll Jaycees and the Northwestern Bell Tele- % I phone Company, Jaycee Chairmen Art Walker and $ ^ John Clark announced. * ^ Area residents with Carroll telephones may £ | participate in the program by dialing a number * | which will be announced at a later date. The num- '» § ber will be printed as a public service of the Car- s g roll Daily Times Herald in the Daily Record column. « §J With clergy of all Carroll faiths taking part, % | the telephone company will make available a tape £ g on which ministers and priests repeat appropriate j$ % prayers, according to a daily schedule, Walker said. % g Telephone company personnel will change the | g recorded messages at about 9 a.m. each day after g » the day's prayer has been taped by the pastor. The S * prayer may be heard at any hour of the day or night § I g simply by dialing the special number Choice of Message on UNICEF Cards Both for $88 HEIRES ELECTRIC The department stores do ajg Another annual Jaycee Christmas project is ! booming business here for thejtf caroling at the Carroll nursing homes. Chairman I entire month of December, as | * Gary Rutten announced that Jaycees and their I housewives search the city forjgj wives will carol at all the nursing homes between j something original in the way;*? 6:30 and 9 p.m. one evening about a week before ! of gifts. Word of a new shipment j ij Christmas ! from a toy factory or clothing | warehouse spreads like light- i ning. The crowds scramble with i special energy to buy up inv : ported toys from England, West \ Germany and other countries. As the housewives do their shopping, the youngsters visit with "Ded Moroz," the bearded, rotund Slavic version of Santa Clans — again a close cousin to the American Santa. The major department stores feature Ded Moroz on a throne. And for a nominal fee, Ded Moroz will show up at the buyer's home in full costume to deliver the packages. Russian children are brought up believing in Santa Glaus — but not in Christ. The Kremlin has succeeded keeping Christ out of Christmas Spirit Lost 'Down Under' By GLORIA NICHOLLS SYDNEY (AP) — Christmas is just not the same in Australia as "back home" in England. Here it just doesn't seem like Christmas. Perhaps it's not surprising as the home in Leeds from which my husband and I emigrated in 1967 is 12,000 miles away and — in the Northern hemisphere where you have the proper Christmas weather, snow and cold. Here all you have at Christmas is scorching sun and humidity. And still the people send out Christmas cards with snow scenes and stagecoaches. in Christmas. Only on the unofficial level does the holiday retain its religious significance. The Russian Orthodox church, by far the largest Russian religious grouping, holds an elaborate and moving Christmas Eve service Jan. 6, still observing the old church calendar which is 13 days behind the official calendar. It's not that we don't have friends or relatives here. We have. But, along with 1.5 million other immigrants to Australia from Britain and Europe since World War II, family ties with the "old country" die hard. Back in Leeds, there was i&s ,>j3j » ( 2!ii *a .>i »»»a:Nfc^ | something special about wrapping up well in coats, scarves and fur boots to venture away from the fireside to go shopping and look at the Christmas street lights and decorations. The North of England smog did nothing to lessen this pleasure. In fact, it made the lights more welcome and attractive. Though the department stores here naturally decorate for Christmas, the lights and the rest don't appear as bright and heart-warming in the sunlight. This is not to say we won't have a "traditional" Christmas dinner. We will — though the conditions don't favor it. By MILTON BESSER UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (AP) - Officials, of the UN. Children's Fund expect another record-breaking year in the sale of the colorful greeting cards that have become a familiar part of the Christmas scene. Last year worldwide sales of nearly 67 million cards netted an unprecedented profit of $4.5 million, nearly 10 per cent of the agency's total income. Nearly half were sold in the United States under the supervision of the U.S. Committee for UNICEF, the traditional initials of the agency aiding children and mothers around the world. Nineteen new designs have been created by artists around the world and as in the past donated to the fund for the 1970 cards. Land Auction Sale Saturday, November 21 1 P.M. SHARP At the farm located 1 mile east, IVi miles north and 1 mile east of Auburn, Iowa; 4 miles west on Highway 175, IV2 miles north, V2 mile west, Vz mile north and V2 mile west of Lake City, Iowa; V/i miles south of Yetter, Iowa. To be sold to the highest bidder the following real estate: 284 acre stock farm, 173 acres tillable, 111 acres in timber and creek pasture (Camp Creek runs through the timber pasture); 84 acre corn base with county average corn yield of 99 bushels per acre. LEGAL DESCRIPTION The South 52.64 acres of the West Half of the Southeast Quarter (WVaSE 1 /^; the North Half of the Southwest Quarter (NV6SW%). All that part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW^SW 1 /*) lying west of Camp Creek. The Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SEViSWVi) in Section 5. The East Half of the Southeast Quarter (EVaSE 1 ^) of Section 6, all in township 86N, range 34W of 5th P.M., Calhoun County, Iowa. Inspection of land and outbuildings can be done anytime prior to sale day. Inspection of dwelling by appointment with the Warren Kruse family, the present tenants. BUILDINGS ARE AS FOLLOWS Large basement barn; corn crib with 16x32 lean-to machine shed, 3000 bushel ear corn capacity, 2000 bushel small grain capacity; Cattle shed, 24x84. Chicken bouse; three-car garage with tool shed attached; Dwelling, 9-room modern house (6 rooms downstairs, three upstairs), built-in cabinets. Good well, complete with pressure systems. Also a good spring that has never gone dry. TERMS OF SALE 20% down with contract on day of Sale. Balanace due and payable on or before March 1, 1971 at the discretion of the buyer when abstract of title with warranty deed is furnished to the buyer. This farm can and will be offered for sale in various tracts to suit the buyer or in one complete unit, whichever is best for all concerned. Auctioneer's Note This form has been in the Kruse family since 1931; has always been farmed by some members of the famly; has been well cared for; in a high state of production; well tiled; line and cross fences fair to good This is a very good stock farm—always a good money-maker—would make an ideal family . farm for young folks. This is sure one you will want to check out in every detail before Sale Day. For further information on this farm contact the executors or auctioneer any time. SELLERS WILL PAY $2.00 PER ACRE COMMISSION TO ANY LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER THAT REGISTERS A BONAFIDE BUYER WITH AUCTIONEER BEFORE SALE TIME. This sale is being held to settle the Estate of Mrs. Frank (Alvina) Kruse. PAUL F. KRUSE, Lake City, Iowa WARREN C. KRUSE, Auburn, Iowa Executors of Said Estate >/ans-in & Swanson, Attorneys for Estate and Clerk of Sale Jeff Staton, Auct. The first greeting card was designed in 1948 by Jitka Vedjova, a 7-year-old Czech girl, in an expression of thanks for goods and medicine sent to her country. She and her husband and young son now live in southern Bohemia. Contributing artists this year come from the United States, Britain, Denmark, Canada, Poland, Spain, Ghana, Italy, Nationalist China, Japan, and Switzerland. In keeping with the practice of recent years, some designs have a religious theme. And the messages on the cards have been changed to provide a choice along this line. Three different messages are provided — Season's Greetings, Merry Christmas and Best Wishes for a Happy New Year, and Peace on Earth. They are printed in the five official languages of the United Nations — English, French, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. Officials say that after paying the expenses of printing, distribution and other costs, a little more than 50 per cent of the retail costs is profit. ! A box of a dozen cards costs $2. The profit from the one box is enough to buy antibiotics to cure 15 children of trachoma, from five boxes enough to buy a bottle sterilizer for a mother and child care center, officials say. • Churches (Continued From Page 1) to us and all men in the uproar. We can rejoice because the j ^witlTit Soup, turkey with stuffing, roast potatoes and veg, and plum pudding, accompanied by drinks aren't the best sort of food when the temperature is over 90 degrees F and the humidity high. The drinks cause a problem, too. The fridge is generally so stuffed with the food and all its trappings that the cans of Aussde beer have to fight for a place. And while "warm" beer in England is acceptable, it would taste like polluted effluent here. We'll probably buy some ice from a gas station, and stick the beer bottles and ice in the bath. And, if it gets just too hot, we'll join the beers. Other aspects diminish the Christmas feeling: Gifts for relatives and friends in the United Kingdom are bought in September or October for mailing — instead of at the last minute on Christmas Eve. (They still might not reach Britain until February.) This leaves another possible link — a Christmas day telephone call. Even with "BST" the time difference is nine hours so to avoid waking people in the U.K. at 4 a.m. on Christmas Day, calls have to be made later than 6 p.m. Sydney time to ensure that all are awake SHOPPING FOR THE GIFTS the Maurice Dunn Unit No. 7 American Legion Auxiliary will send to the Christmas Gift Shop at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Iowa City are Mrs. Ralph Hoffmann, left, rehabilitation chairman, and Mrs. LuVern Olberding, child welfare chairman. —Staff Photo The Carroll unit annually sends gifts to this project which gives hospitalized veterans a chance to shop for and send gifts home for Christmas. This year, the Carroll unit purchased gifts for 15 women, such as the pillow cases the women are shown looking at. Auxiliary Again Sponsor of a Veterans Gift Shop j King of Glory has come. The Christmas Day worship will be at 10 a.m.; and a New Year's Eve Worship Service at 7 p.m. Dec. 31. Various groups from the church will share the joy of Christmas with sick and shut-ins by caroling during the holidays. Fruit baskets are also being prepared for families who are in need of them. A portrayal of the birth of Christ will highlight the annual Christmas program of the Assembly of God Church, the Rev. Maxine Rogers has announced. The program, to be given at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 20, will feature the Sunday School departments, including beginners, juniors and teens, under the direction of Sunday School Superintendent Gary Kraft and Mrs. Milles Lane. Assisting with the preparation of skits and recitations will be Linda Rogers, pianist; Mrs. Kenneth Long and Richard Flowers. The choir will provide musical accompaniment and sing familiar carols. The queue for such calls is immense. Unless the call is booked up to a year in advance, it's as well to forget it. And if the possibility of an alternative call on New Year's Eve or Jan. 1 is contemplated, that is out, too. Veterans who must spend the holiday season away from their families while in the Veterans Administration Hospital at Iowa City won't miss out on the Christmas fun of shopping for and sending gifts to their families. The Iowa Department American Legion Auxiliary annually sponsors a Christmas Gift Shop at the hospital. Mrs. Ralph Hoffmann, re- Gift of the First Water Everyone loves a gift that (1) nobody ever heard of; (2) is useful as well as good-looking; (3) keeps on giving all year. What we're saying is that a new easy-to-install shower head called Body Toner could be your gift gimmick of the year! This beautifully designed shower accessory boasts three swirling jets which toss triple streams of diffused droplets in a rhythmic pattern ... thus creating a massaging sensation on neck, shoulders and back which is simultaneously invigorating and calming. Finger-flick settings range from springtime sprinkle to drumming deluge . . . obviously great for facials and shampoos as well as show ers. Should your beloved g i f t e e happen to be a member of the family, won't it be nice to share that new-found sense of well-being the shower accessory promises? Self-cleaning, it is guaranteed clog- and corrosion-proof. Attractively packaged and ready to gift wrap, this extra ordinary contrivance comes in chrome, harvest gold, porcelain white or avocado green. habilitation chairman of Mau- j ditional gifts for the shop. at rice Dunn Unit No. 7, and Mrs. j the hospital, and to furnish can- LuVern Olberding, child welfare chairman, were in charge of purchasing the Carroll Auxiliary's share of the items to be sent to the gift shop. This year the Carroll unit has purchased gifts for 15 women, including such things as cosmetics, cologne, costume jewelry, billfolds, fancy towels, pillow cases, aprons handkerchiefs, stationary and scarves. These items were sent unwrapped to Iowa City, after being displayed at their Nov. 11 Veterans Day dinner. Auxiliaries throughout Iowa teen books to the veterans. Funds for the Gift Shop project are derived from the annual sale of memorial poppies which are made by the veterans. Each unit's Christmas assignment is based on its last year's membership. Another Christmas activity for the Carroll unit, headed by Mrs. Dale Bernholtz, will be a special Christmas party at their regular December meeting, Dec. 15. At the party, the Legion Auxiliary members will entertain the Junior Auxiliary members. The unit is also in take part in the project. The I the process of collecting items veterans may choose articles displayed at the Gift Shop, and Auxiliary Blue Ladies, wrap and mail the gifts for the veterans. Cash sent along with the gift articles is used to purchase ad- to be exchanged for toys to send to orphanages. Mrs. Olberding, who is in charge of this annual Christmas project, placed cans in Carroll stores in early November for residents to deposit the items. Lebanon Honors True Brotherhood of Man BEIRUT, Lebanon, (AP) — 1 holiday doesn't pose much of Christmas comes several times j a problem," said one Lebanese GIFT WRAP IDEAS Here are some suggestions for achieving that personally gift wrapped look. The children on your list will be delighted to find Santa Claus's smiling face on their presents. For this jolly portrait, cut out Santa's features from heavy paper in appropriate colors and paste them onto a rectangular box. If you prefer, you can use self-adhesive paper. It comes in all colors and can be cut to resemble any form you like and attached to the top of your paper. Popular motifs for such cut-outs are little angels or animals. If you're not talented in the drawing department, simply trace your cut-outs from magazine or books. a year in Lebanon and even the Moslems hang out the mistletoe. There are about two dozen religious holidays a year in this eastern Mediterranean country with its population of 2.4 million almost evenly divided between Christians and Moslems. The government, which is always headed by a Christian president and a Moslem prime minister, encourages observance of religious holidays because it ties the different sects together and promotes national unity. It also prevents outbreaks of religious fighting that have troubled other parts of the world. Beginning in mid-December "Moslems and Christians give parties, decorate their homes, stores and streets and exchange cards and gifts," one Lebanese said. "Like other parts of the world with non-Christian religions, Christmas here is becoming in many respects a secular holiday." In past years, some Moslem holidays, which are determined by the moon, fell around Christmas and heightened the festive mood. That doesn 't happen this year but conveniently Christmas falls on a Friday, the Moslem sabbath. "The religious aspect of the Moslem. "Our religion recognizes Jesus as a prophet but not as important as Mohammed. In fact some of the most beautiful verses of the Koran are the ones that describe Mary and her child. Actually there are several Christmases in Lebanon, which Ministry of Tourism officials never tire of describing as the only country in which Jesus Christ took a vacation. The Eastern church — the Greek Orthodox and the Armenians — follow the Julian calendar, which is 13 days behind the Gregorian one used by the Protestants, Roman Catholics and Maronite Catholics. This means there is an almost continous round of celebrations between Dec. 24 and their Christmas. On these holidays, Moslem leaders visit Christian political leaders and clergy to pay their repects. Then the Christians return the visits on Moslem feasts. "The concept of brotherhood among men is a characteristic of both religions," a Lebanese said. When Christmas and other holidays come, the Lebanese j translate the idea into action.' It's one of the strengths of our, country." 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