The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan on November 11, 1939 · Page 6
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The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan · Page 6

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Ludington, Michigan
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Saturday, November 11, 1939
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Page 6
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THE DAILY NEWS—LUDINGTON, MICHIGAN. SATURDAY, NOV. 11, 1939. • ,| i^rL* tut • j_ /*•• i r**^. n /** • j fi*j_i noles Whip Manistee; Clinch Big Seven Grid Title Smashing Victory Ends Season for Conference Score Is 40-0 as Local Team Has little Difficulty Winning Big Seven Standings ttudlngton 5 0 1.000 Alpena 4 0 1.00! Tfraverse City 4 2 .61 Ctedillac 2 4 Manflstee 1 3 .23 Cheboygan 0 3 Petoskey 0 4 (By LOUIS BOCKSTANZ Ludington high school Orioles were Big Seven footbfell champions for the second secutlve year following smashing 40-0 victory Manistee Chippewas at Ma tee Friday evening. The g which clinched the title Ludington, also wound up [the season for the two teams. The Big Seven race was also auan end, all teams having comeVto the end of the schedule. Tra\- erse City defeated Petoske 34-0, in the only other i conference tilt. The Orioles out-played the Chippeiwas throughout the entire contest, taking the edge in all departments. Not once did the home team seriously threaten to upset the Orioles, the reserves even holding the northern neighbors in check and scoring a touchdown against them. Manistee's powerful ace, Capt. Bob Peterson, the player on .whom the Chippewas pinned their hopes, had the wind taken out of his sails early in the game and from that spoint on was merely another player trying unsuccessfully to stop the Oriole rampage. The Ludington squad clicked Friday evening Ibetter than at any time so far this year. All plays worked smoothly, practically every one being good for some gain. Manistee plays, on 'the other hand, were smothered time and again by the Ludington line which was striving to prove wall. itself really an all-star Smick's First Season Manistee's defeat marked the end of Danny Smick's first grid season at Chippewa town. This Crisler-trained former Univer- STATISTICS _____--Sfatistics Lud. Man\ Yards gained from scrimmage... 2.38 32 Yards gained passing 47 32 Yards lost from scrimmage 0 10 Total net gain 285 54 First downs 12 2 Passes tried 6 7 Passes completed 3 3 Runback-Punits .. 118 0 Penalties 25 15 Ludington punted twice, once into the end-zone, for a net distance of 44 yards, an average of 22 yards per kick. Manistee punted seven times for a total of 153 yards, an average of slightly better than 25 yards per kick. Manistee fumbled once and Ludington recovered. Ludington fumbled once but recovered. »^NX%^^XXXN. '— The second quarter opened with Ludington holding the ball on Manistee's 39 yard line. Snow hit the left end of the line for three yards but Manistee was penalized five yardi for offsides. Daron came around the backfield in an end around play for two yards. Snow then walloped the line for a first down. Plays toy Parker, D. Horowski, Ezdebski and Bowden then put the ball down on the Manistee 5 yard stripe. Bowden picked up one yard on a line plunge and Snow roared through a hole in the line for the third touchdown, making the score 20-0 where it re- when the extra-point Brooklyn Dodgers-Washington Redskin Battle Is Leading Tilt on Sunday (By JUDSON BAILEY) NEW YORK, Nov. Sunday, .visited Ludington last year, four of its five members turned in games of 600 or better, high being 629 by Bauman. Watch these boys this Sunday. They're the real article. But don't forget that's a money crew they're going up against. The Ludington team is composed' of bowlers who have proven their ability when the chips are down. It'll probably be the match of the There will be fireworks popping all over the National Pro Footfall league Friday, but more sky- aockets are likely to be set off in rooklyn during the Dodgers- ashington Redskins fracas an anywhere else. This is no idle jest. The imes which bring together the licago Bears and Detroit, the licago Cardinals and New ork, and the Green Bay Packs and Philadelphia loom fully s important in the standings, ut they won't have any Ace arker pitching against a Samly Baush and an Andy Farkas. Having, regained a tie with the Hants for the Eastern division ad, Washington brought a •ippled but scrappy team to mained failed. Parker Scores of Michigan star, although ISuJr" his season was a poor one, W " C1C Ludington KicKeo. to Manistee and the Chippewas tried three plays in attempts to gain yardage before punting to Ludington, the ball 'being downed on the 21 yard line toy Parker who narrowly missed going down the field for the score. On the next play, however, Parker completed the run, skirting left end for 21 yards and the score, the play being made behind perfect blocking try the Oriole linemen. A try for extra point failed placed hi& charges higher in the estimation of Big Seven foes than they have been in several overwhelmed Orioles, the Chippewas showed spirit until the final whistle and tried vainly, in t)ie closing minutes to convert at least one score. Gone, however, in the Manistee years. Although toy the powerful attack, were the evident enrlier in fancy plays the season and straight football was featured toy the Chippewas. The Orioles made most of their yardage on line plunges and end plays. As usual, they steered clear of a barrage of passes. Punting was not as good in Friday's game as it has ibeen in other games, due chiefly to the high wind which streaked across the field through the entire game. There were practically as many Ludington fans at the game as Manistee fans. All persons attending, the game shivered as the night grew into the coldest football weather of the current season. It was an ideal football night for all except the spectators, however,' toeing dry and chilly. Few fumbles were noticed. Gets Touchdown Ludington started its scoring drive early In trie gattie.'Ta&king madnder of the the first half Following the kickoff in the second half, the game was all Ludington's, the Orioles holding the ball until after the period's first score, made midway in the canto, was chalked up. All play was deep in Manistee territory, a number of plays putting the ball down on the Chippewa 25 yard marker. Snow then hit right tackle for two yards. Parker, taking the play, fumbled the ball but recovered it and went around left end for eight yards and a first down on Manistee's 13. Ezdebski hit the line for six yards and Snow penetrated the line for a touchdown, running the count to 32-0 where it remained only until a pass from Parker to D. Horowski converted the extra point, the count then toeing 330. A complete reserve team was then substituted and no further decisive action took place in the quarter. Ludington resumed its attack in the opening of the final canto. The Oriole reserves worked the ball down to the to Manistee, the ball—ibemg downed on the Manistee 30- yard line. On the first play of the game, a Chippewa fumbled the toall and Dave Horowski pinned it to the earth. Bowden then took the ball through the line for two yards after which Parker streaked around left end for 17 yards and a first down. Bowden knifed through the line for five yards and Parker completed a pass to Snqw for nine yards. Stanley •Horowski then slipped into pay territory on a plunge through tackle to make the first touchdown of the game. Bowden plunged and converted the extra point, making the score 7-0. . Ludington kicked to Manistee who tried twice to make yardage tout each time hit the solid Oriole line for no gain. Peterson then kicked to Parker who ^downed the oval on the Manis- 26. Snow walloped the cen- * the line for two yards went around left end t yards, snow again hit the lor two yards and Bowden over the final stripe for J touchdown. Show tackle for the ex- and the count was 14- the second touchdown, arter progressed tdlngton holding Of the, time.- All in Manistee ter- Chippewfts had jtfte ^Qdrtplea were • tor ajmaUHter Manistee two yard line where it i was held on downs. Manistee, taking the initiative, tried one play which was good for two yards and then punted a short way out, the toall toeing downed on the Manistee 20. A pass from Peterson to Olson then gave the Orioles their final touchdown. Gebott walloped the line for the extra point. With the score 40-0, Manistee tried vainly to get a score as the final canto waned. Pass after pass was incomplete. The Oriole first squad was put in the game with but a minute to play, assuming the role of ending the season which they had so successfully negotiated. The lineups: LUDINGTON MANISTEE Daron le Peprocki Bourisseau It Bialik iwn today for the vital busi- ess of staying at the top. It hardly can expect help from i ledged. By LEE KRUSKA One of the outstanding treats of the season is anticipated Sunday afternoon when the strong Stroh's bowling team of Detroit invades Smith's alleys for a set- to with a' local all-star group. The strong brewery outfit is scheduled to bowl in Traverse City tonight and will arrive in Ludington Sunday morning. The match, scheduled to start promptly at 1 p. m. is expected to draw the largest crowd of the season. There is no admission charge. Five Ludington keglers, who need no introduction to local alley addicts have been selected to uphold Ludington's colors. They are Herb Johnson and Ted Newhoff, veteran Tamper keglers; Russell Schoenherr, Willoughby's ball a la speed thrower; George Hillman, one of the rising young aces and Ray Taylor, whose coolness under pressure is acknow- the hapless Cardinals, who have' won only a single game this season and aren't likely to snatch another one at the expense of Steve Owen's sturdy club, still stinging from a defeat by Detroit. The Redskins injuries struck hardest among their blocking backs but, offsetting this blow to their running attack, Baugh suddenly has shown a . recovery of his great passing form. All this would seem to indicate that Washington will depend considerably on its aerial armada. Brooklyn's strongest weapon also has been its forward passing and Parker is tied for the individual passing leadership of I Combined average of the Ludington team is 179.0. Here's how the individuals stack up: Hillman, (two leagues) 185.7; Schoenherr, 181.7; Johnson, 181.2; Taylor, 173.6; Newhoff, 170.5. Last year, three of the present team rolled against Stroh's— Schoenherr, Johnson and Taylor. The visiting Stroh's team hold so many records it would bers. Handy Things had a swell chance to crimp their style Thursday night out was not equal to the task, dropping three straight, in the face of a consistent onslaught. Incidentally there are only three ladies' league rollers who have not bowled under 400 as yet. They are Edith Schwartz and Mrs. M. Meyers of Russell's and Alice Moline of the Tamper. Seems to be a lot of bowling interest in Scottville this year. That City Food team in the ladies' loop, although not doing so well at present, has a lot of fun at the alleys. And primarily, that's the real purpose of bowling. It is regrettable that Scottville is not represented in the Industrial league as was at first intended. Tom O'Hearn of the Scottville bank is one of the most ardent keglers in the nearby city. Efforts are being made, so we're told, to book some of the strongest bowling teams in the Northern Michigan cities are talking of a proposed bowling league one which would do its rolling on Sundays. Traverse, Manistee, Cadillac, Petoskey and even Mt. Pleasant have said they're interested. It's a pretty tough proposition getting an inter-city bowling league to function properly, about that. Ask J. B. one night, like "Loulo" Antler- son and his team did the other night... wonder how long Loulr'.s mark is going to stand . . . Bowlers, in general fattened their averages Wednesday, with exception of some ot the league leaders . . . It's strango how closely bunched the last three individuals in the Commercial Hip, Five are . .. only two-tenths of a point difference . . . Bob Weir not, his 200 game Wednesday night. .. he was last in the Commercial to turn the trick . . . The scorers have been fooling around with The Daily News score sheets lute- ly . . . they had Clarence Hall down as Dr. Hall and Don Crawford down as Crawfish. Prize of the week goes to Steve Nerheim, bowling with Ludington Lions for one minute bowling a fancy 99 game and then sur, IM , ... - ,, , prising even himself in the next Who are those four handsome £ lth £ 5 s Bcnson o Mcyers , bowling solons who had their Car , Haw i ey c L Pell picture taken recently around erm oriH swoikhnrf on Harry Hallett's counter? Close inspection proves they look somewhat like J. B., Zeke, "Peck" Reed and Harry Hallett, himself. Speaking of Harry Hallett, watch him go to town tne next time he I rolls. He picked up a lucky rab- j bit's foot somewhere and has been rubbing his ball with it all week. This is our "They'll do it very time" department. Don Crawford, bowling with Nelson's the other night nad 202 and 209 in son and Sweikhart, all Industrial league kcglers, turned in their first 200 games of the season this week. Now go and get more, boys! We haven't mentioned the Industrial league much this week state for attractionsThere later"in tne first two S ames and just ffieSn^gffittonsire be- ^en he was sure he was go ing t^ ikrr ^rmriiinrprt of- nrACPnt «.-irh l °U thc " rs fc °°0 SBriCS Of his life, thl s'rongoarber ffiSteanVS S esss .S d , and *>» had to Saginaw and there is talk of try- lwivp s toIIErh ' ing to get the crack E & B and ] Goebel teams from Detroit. We'd i like to see more than one nationally known team here a year. Well, King's Court did it. Having wondered for a long time which team in Ludington would ^"^l!? £? l^J? .!L S 1 _ th . e . m J be the first to crack 1,000 pins per They have the same team roster that exhibited here last year: W. Reppenhagen, Wolf, < Noris, Bauman and Grygier. After a visit to the bowling al- game, the Popmen ended worries by Capt. grand and knocking off 52 to spare. our one Now — —- •-—" P»MFW*A.*^ A^iMVtV*.!. UiA4 J. Lf VJ* ( i • t— i. * 1 the league. On this basis it'll be'] eys anv mght of the week when a great surprise everytime eith-! I 6 *?" 6 contests are in progress, er team ventures a ground play I $ K . evident . tha t bowling en- 1 we're wondering whether or not 'any Ludington team will be able to "topple a 3,000 series. Go to it boys! King's Court was only 38 pins away from it Wednesday. Twenty-three games of 200 or v^*l*4Al T \^ J.1-1/UA t-O Cb E£XV/UilU L/lttj ! iV. * 1 Tiv-4-tvj f*i*.v-v, £)U*j.t^.Lj v i w\s v» The Detroit Lions whose re-1 U} usiasm an d rivalry is keener better in Commercial league play • - ' ^is year than it has been in a j Wednesday night is a new season long time. The game has made record. Record of five series of long strides in the past few years. 500 or over set Oct 25. still Today practically all bowlers j stands but it'll go on the boards wear bowling shoes, a few years I any day now. ago regarded as somewhat of a j i n case you're interested, luxury. And it's surprising when Plumb and Nelson has 21,403 one learns of the number of bowl- I pins to date—more than anyone cord of six victories and a lone defeat is the best in either division, Ls confronted with a forbidding hurdle in the Bears, who lead the league in scoring and ground gaining. Unless the Lions accomplish the risk, however, the western leaders are going to be as close together as Broadway and Seventh avenue at Times Square. Green Bay has what is known as a touch at Philadelphia and a Olson, Birke's star and incidentally the only portsider in the Commercial league, picked up a slow-motion strike Wednesday. Sesems like the pins went down one by one. Got to get the breaks once in a while, eh Lefty? Random strikes .. . "Russ" Rasmussen bowled under a handicap Wednesday night ... it seems "Russ" dropped a log on his leg and he should have been home instead of on an alley . . . what is this fatal fascination about bowling that gets 'em . . . That's some kind of a record in itself, breaking four season records in column but we'll try to do next week . . . See you at the big match Sunday afternoon, Football Results (By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS) HIGH SCHOOL Ludlngton 40. Manistee 0. Traverse City 34. Petoskey 0. Evnrt 27. Reed City 18. Lansing Central 21. Lansing Eastern 0. East Lansing 7. Mt. Pleasant 6. COLLKtiE Kalnmazoo 47. Adrian 0. Michigan Normal 16. Alma fl. DcSnles 26. Grand Rapids College 0. Michigan State Freshmen 'i. Wcstorn State Freshmen C. "All Is Not Gold That Glitters" You can't judge entirely by appearance. All insurance agency service is not the same. Let us show you what we mean %y "Service Beyond the Contract." n O' Standatu protection ROHN INSURANCE AGENCY SECURITY - Since 1889 - SERVICE Second Floor National B>nk Building '•vLUDINGTON - MICHIGAN^ (Additional Sports on Page 5) LYRIC TONIGHT 7:00-9iOO 30c and lOc. R K ers, men and women both, who | i n the Commercial. King's Court Broariwav snH i now ,? wn their own balls - Tne ' is running a good second in that oiudQway ana number is constantly increasing, | department. Did you know thus Bears too, we're told. Russell's Beauty Salon is leading the other teams in the ladies triumph for the would give all Detroit and ies apiece w on two defeats and the Bears a breath behind with three. ,£ 1 !l!! and . and Pittsburgh are I this season'was put there e'ither , league a merry chase, if it can be called merry. Their lead seems - to be getting larger every week. j They have three bowlers among latter team has the youngest average age of any team in the loop? Yep! We don't know exactly but it must be somewhere between 23 and 25. Other teams in the league call them the "kids" in an affectionate way. champions, idle this week-end . league's leading five, in ad- j They're defending j dition, every record on the books j you know. When the Krupa Anderson .., Reynolds ... Pape D. Horowski Parker S. Horowski Bowden . .c.. ..rg. .rt.. . .re. ..qb. ..In. .rh.. Snow fb. . Schrader Van Andel .. Gumieny ... Rozarek ... Topping .... Batzer Ellis Witkowski B. Peterson by the team or to one of its mem- of Detroit, strong Stroh team which will be here DODGE < £<tve Afon&t/ MKKHEIM MOTOR TO SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY DEER HUNTERS ATTENTION Substitutions: Ludington ! Ezdebski, B. Daron, Olson, Kist- ! ler, Pokora, Hollick, Gebott i Rakfal, Harmon, Atkinson and Eichler. BUY YOUR Test Your Skill at Bowling! It's real enjoyment to find yourself improving in this exciting sport of skill . . . enjoy the thrill of spilling all the pins . . . You can do it! SMITH'S EECEEATION BUCK SHOT at WHOLESALE PRICES We are closing out our entire stock—Here is your chance to buy them at lowest prices in Mason county. Reliable Tire and Accessories Co. TEMPERATURE TODAY AT 11:00 Weather Forecast 30 Lower Michigan: Mostly cloudy tonight and Sunday. Not so cold tonight in southwest portion. Somewhat warmer in south portion Sunday. DID THE RAIN COME Through the roof, the ceiling and down the walls? You know the remedy for years to come, a new J. M. roof. A roof to suit any purse. THE LUDINGTON LUMBER CO. For Correct Time Phone 99 JAMES DKfS THAT 6-MEHTOOKTEK WHOU CAGNEY in his most perfect role. PJRISCILLA LANE '..'"». ^*.'" - '• '; Morwi/ndertul " ,i ' than tiver • HUMPHREY BOGART GLADYS GEORGE JEFFREY LYNN FRANK McHUGH -PAUL MELI.V Directed by RAOUl WAISH. '. •'.. ^ A WARNER BROS. Piciuro " :..•;'. Written by th« man who kn«w it bt«t ...MARK HELLINGERI Matinee Sunday 25c and lOc. Nights 30c and lOc. Iron Fireman AUTOMATIC COAL FIRING Is Your Best Eet Iron Fireman can be quickly installed in your present heating or power plant. Let us mak« a free survey and report, showing the savings and betterments Iron Fireman can make for you. DAN SOU and CO. PHONE 721 It's Almost That Time of Year-! Better get your order in now for a case of BLESER BETTER BEER and be prepared for the festive occasion. PLUMB and NELSON Distributors Buy it at your tavern or carry out store. i \ rVUWVWWVWWW? Ask us to LOAN MONEY if you think you have a worthwhile use for it. Making SAFE LOANS is our business Make OUR Bank YOUR Bank LUDINGTON STATE BANK M6MB6R FEOiRRl DEPOSIT INSURANCE C,)RP * IIID'NGION ,MICH.

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