The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on February 3, 1933 · Page 5
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 5

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Bakersfield, California
Issue Date:
Friday, February 3, 1933
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Page 5
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THE BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1933 COMMUNITY NEW LEADERS ARE NAMED AT CLASS MEETINGS Feb. 8.—Class meetings were held by the'senior, sophomore and freshmen classes nt tho local high school Wednesday afternoon. Miss Margie Calkins was re- hlecte'd president of the senior class; Glenn Crockett] vice-president; Mary Thompson, secretary, and Thelma Moore, treasurer. Richard Alexander was also reelected president for. the Sophomore class for the second semester, which started Monday; Frank Hancock, vice- president; Mary Shlck, secretary; Gladys Peterson, treasurer, and Peggy Danner, yell leader. . Jim Jones was elected president of the freshman class to take the place of Wilbur Kruger, who served during the , first semester; Virgil Weddle, vice-president; Bonnie McGce, secretary; Virginia Wirt, treasurer, and Dennis Weaver, sergeant-at-arms. The members of the Junior class held election of officers at a recent ..meeting and Miss Violet Roome was elected president. Buy American Plan Is Favored at Taft TAFT, Feb. 3.—The Taft Central Labor Council, at Its meeting in the Labor temple this week, endorsed the "Buy American" campaign and urged that all assure themselves they were buying American by purchasing union made merchandise. The council also expressed Itself as being against any change In the present California state gas tax laws. Election and Installation of officers will take place at the meeting of the council next Monday night. Plan for Better Control of Colds Proved, by Tests Greensboro, N. C.—In clinical, tests among thousands—in schools, colleges and homes—the new Vlcks Plan for better Control of Colds reduced th< number and duration of colds by half —cut the costs of colds more than half! Pull details of tho Plan are In each package of VIckB' VapoRub am the new Vicks Nose and Throa Drops.—Adv. Taft Sorority Girls Are Tea Hostesses TAFT, Feb. 3.—A Valentine tea was tlven by Gamma Kuppij Phi Bororlty Wednesday afternoon ut tho home of USB Liorabcth Daniels In honor of mothers nnd friends of the members. Entertainment wns fflven by metn- )erM of tho sorority and Included a )luno solo by Miss Phyllis Adlclsson; fading by Mr6. Bud Simpson; vocnl iQlo by Mrs. Don Gray; n ftklt by hree pledges, the- Misses Phyllis Ad- dsnon, Lorabeth Daniels and Sarah Taylor; vociil solo by Miss Geneva Conn, vocal duet by Mrs. Don Gray nd Mlgs Geneva Keun and piano solo by Mrs, A. -M. Barter. Ten was served to Mendnmes W. L. Adklsson, A. M. Barter, A. H. Piftachl, W. H. Daniels, C. 13. Burns, J. W. Gholson, E. M. Garner. M. E. Ohrls- tensen, H. R. Kean, Vincent IMmn, Jon Gray, Hud Simpson, Cecil Lewis, Verne Mullen nnd the Misses Geneva Kean, Phyllis Adklsson,, Ijorabeth and Sarah Taylor. -+-»-•Delano Matron Back From Trip to South DELANO, Feb. S. — Mrs. Paye 3wan and her two sonn, LeRoy and Gerald have just returned from Los Angeles where Mrs. Swan went to meet her brother, Francis Dlxon who Is radio operator on the new S. S. Lurllne. Mr. Dlxon Is well known In Kern county, having attended both grammar and high schools here. The Delano youth Is serving on the ship's maiden voyage. Tho new $8,000,000 liner left Xew York January 12 and arrived at LOB Angeles January 28 via the Panama canal. The tour will Include Hawaii, Samoa Islands FIJI Islands, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Ball, Java, Singapore, Slam, Philippine Islands, China and Japan. The ship will return to San Francisco April 24 and will begin her regular run from the Pacific coast to Honolulu. Mrs. Swan and her sons were guests of Mrs. Swan's parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. Dlxon of Montebello while she was in the south.• Taf t Elks Lodge Nominates Staff TAFT, Feb. 3.—Taft Elks Lodtfe entertained members of the Knights of Columbus last night In the Elks home at a joint meeting. This was Past Exalted Rulers' night and C. A. Shaney presided, assisted by Past Exulted, Rulers P. E. Jordan and Leo M.' Loftus. Nomination of officers WHS opened nnd resulted as follows James A. Joyce, exalted ruler; Fritz Utzcrath, leading knlRht; A. P'. Anderson, loyal knight; Robert C. Dear, lecturing knight; Frank -J. Daly, secretary; A. F. Lytle, treasurer; E. C. Plnkhain, outer guard; J. A, Joyce, delegate to grand lodge; S. J. McKlnnon, alternate. A bridge party followed the meet- Ing, with the Elks team defeating the Knights, 16,621 points to 14,185 points. Thatcher and Kropsky were high for tha Elks team with 2302 points and Plalsted and Price were high for tho Knights with 1894 'points. Refreshments followed the card party, ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL 1MB COUNTY P. LA. T AI'T, Feb. 3.— The Kern County West Side Council of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers held Its Founders' day celebration Wednesday afternoon In tho teachers' rest room at the high school. The meeting was opened by tho president, Mrs. Myrtle Cnsley, after which Mrs. A. U. Mulford led the P. T. A. prayer and Mrs. Mabel Bond, tho flag salute. It was voted to give Mrs. Maude Johnson $75 for student aid work. She gave a report of her work. It was announced that the council nominating committee will meet at the home of Mrs. W. T. Walton, February 18. Doctor Herbert Stoltz, director of the state department of parental education, will be in Bakersfleld February 28. Ho will speak in tho afternoon and In the evening. A dinner will be served at 6 o'clock. On February 24, the Taft Union Hlfrti School will help the Elk Hills school In n benefit program In the Elk Hllln auditorium. There will be a band concert and other features. Mrs. J. T. Baker read reports from the legislation committee ot tho state board In regard to pending educational Issues. It was voted that tho program outlined by the state board be endorsed by the council. The meeting was turned over to tho Founder's clay chairman, Mrs. Waller Campbell. This month iniirkfi tho thirty-sixth anniversary of the founding of P. T. A. Candles were lighted in memory of the founders, Mrs. Alice Blrney and Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, and all stood In silent prayer. Mrs. E. G. Sewoll then sang "Auld Lang Syne," accompanied by Mrs, Hermon D. Pot- lit at tho piano. Mrs. Campbell paid tribute to the founders nnd their wonderful vision and Mrs, Sewell sang "Trees." The oak tree? dmblem of P. T. A., was represented by a small tree and Its application to the different branches of P. T. A, work was explained by the past couticll presidents, Tho .presidents of locnl or- gunlzHtlons then formed a seml-olrcle around the treo anil each one gave a brief history of her null. Thn meeting wan later adjourned to the cafeteria, whero cake and coffee were served. A tour, of tho shops was the main feature of the Parent Teacher association of tho Kern County Union High School Wednesday afternoon. K. W. Rich, head of the shop department, acted as conductor. This survey created a great deal of Interest among the mothers as some of their own sons aro taking shop subjects. Previous to the tour, gavels were presented by Mr. Rich to the president, Mrs. Mela Sheldon, and to Mrs. Andrew Hancock, president of Sov- «nth District, California Parents and ; Teachers. These gavel.M were made i by the boys In the wood-shop. Mrn. Hancock In presenting n. Founder's day talk, cxprcxMed the following thought: "Uy IH-IIIR Informed, inemborH of the P. T. A may promote the Ideas of our founders." MI'H. I. Tl. Port«r spoke of some of the many hills before the LegltslHturo, reminding parents of the rwdlo broadcasts over stations KPO mid XCA conducted by the state board of education. Mrs. Frank , Stewart was elected delegate nnd Mrs. Sheldon alternate to the City Council of Parents and Teachers. Tho members of the nominating committee elected to select tho officers for the ensuing yenr are Mesdames Dana G. Btng, chairman, O. L. Frost, C. T. Wachob, F. A. Canflcld and Mr. H. A. Splndt. Plans for the "Play'Night" which WILL BE CELEBRAB TAFT, Feb. n.—Taft Troop No. 29, Boy Koouts Is extending an Invitation In nil Hoy Scout troops of the West Hide In l>« present ut the Lincoln school gymnasium this evening at 7:10 oYltick to oplelinitfc Boy Scout Anniversary Week. All Boy Scouts are imkeU to bring their parents. Troop commltloenien and Scoutmasters ure especially Invited. Claurto L. Wnluli Is .Scoutmaster of Troop 29. will take place early next month were also formulated. An unusual amount of Interest wns shown by parents and members of thn faculty in this evening of games, both new and old high school students. 'Many now mothers of freshman students from Kmerson, Washington, Hawthorne and Beardsley schools were Introduced hy Mrs. Sheldon. MISS BOYD HONORED WASCO, Feb. 3.—Miss Carrie Boyd wae -the honoree at a, birthday anniversary party given by Miss Clara Carpenter and Miss Cora Fulton at the Elmes home last evening. Hearts were played and a prize for high score was won -by Miss Shyrle Summers. Miss Boyd was presented with a. gift and had the honor of cutting tho birthday cake, which was Berved with the refreshments. Guests were Misses Carrie Boyd, Teresa Burke, Shyrle Summers, Isabel Hull, Mrs. Leland Brier unrt Mrs. Ruth Sherwln. B. F. Stinson Market 17D9-JL1 Chester Avenue Phone 612 'S. & H." Green Stamps—All Departments Large Ranch Eggs Sugar Blsqulck Saturday and Monday 2 r 35c 10 Gold Medal Cake Flour pkg. Chase & Sanborn- Dated Coffee Ib. Bon-Ton Currants.........pkg.' Prunes 10-lb* box 43c 29c 25e 3lc 16c Butter, Solid pound Sunshine Krlsple A Crackers •» Mammoth A Olives, 9'OZ •• Peanut Butter, C. P. C PJUsbury Pancake Flour large Nucoa, A ' Best Foods.... at Sunshine A 22c 25c 25c I5c pkg. I9C I9c for i b . lb». •Ginger Snaps.. s» ibs, Frye Bros. Progressive Meat Market Best Quality Meat at Low Prices Leg Pork Roast .Ib. Steer Pot Roast Ib. Longhorn 4 O A Cheese Ib. IOC 12c 12c Lean Pork steak.;: 2ib,25c Colorado Gold 90* Butter Ib. aVOC Eastern Sliced Bacon Ib. FREE DELIVERY 20c FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DEPARTMENT No. 1 Klamath Falls Russet Potatoes, 40* 25-lb. Bag VOB Yams or Sweet Potatoes.. - 25c No. 1 NewtoM r n Pippin f> Apples U Ibs. Or 95c Box Large Cauliflower 25c or Celery A for 2 forlSC Bananas fi 4C«h Qlbs.aWC Dry Onions..., 4 n lOc Grapefruit . doz. 20c Parsnips 3 M 10c Juice Oranges.. 25c All Bunch Vegetables. . 2f.r5C GALATAS BROS. Quality Fruits and Vegetables 2011 Chester Avenue—in Bakersfield .Hardware Free peHvery Phone 261 2Se $1.36 Apples, Extra O Fancy Pippins V Box, 85c Oranges, Edison, Large box Potatoes, U. S. No. 1 Klamath...25-lb. sack Grapefruit, Large ft Arizona V Grapefruit, 9.A* Edison doi. wW* Celery «| for Hearts t for 25c I0c Spltzenburg Apples, Extra 7 Fancy I Peas, Extra A Fancy •» String Beans, A Fresh a* Tomatoes, A Solid £ Artichokes, E Lar0e 9 Bunch ' Vegetables. 25e 26c 26e 25e 2Se 5c ecottomM ..here's economy without sacrificing quality/ Sunshine Krispy Crackers are helping women all over the country cut down food bills these budget- slashing days. That's the reason you find the familiar, big, blue and white Krispy package sitting proudly on millions of pantry shelves. These dainty, slightly salted squares do delicious things to appetites all through meals... especially with soups and salads, with jellies and cheese. And hungry, healthy youngsters have a habit of racing home right after school when they know they're going to get Krispy Crackers spread with jam or peanut butter. Why such popularity ? . . . They're crisper! Extra flaky! And they have a delicate flavor that comes from specially plump, sun-ripened wheat used by Sunshine Bakers in their Full Grain Process .. .That's why! Careful housewives insist on Krispy Crackers at their grocers' because they know that Sunshine Bakers have never allowed quality to pay toll to unwise economy. BILL! Also sold, for your convenience, in ^ larger aud smaller size packages* KRISPYCW unsmne r% r% • ^ r • \^racKers LOOSE-WILES BISCUIT COMPANY. . . SAN FRANCISCO, OAKLAND

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