The Carroll Sentinel from Carroll, Iowa on October 5, 1894 · Page 8
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The Carroll Sentinel from Carroll, Iowa · Page 8

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Carroll, Iowa
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Friday, October 5, 1894
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Page 8
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TWISTER IN ARKANSAS. Business Portion of Little Rock Almost Devastated. .._.. __-__ these fellows, and because that has bj out off and tbe differeutial on refit A FRIEND Speaks through the Boothbay (Me.) Ktglittr, ol the beneficial results he has received from a regular use of Ayer'i Pills. He says: "I was feeling sick and tired and my stomach seemed all out ot order. I tried a number cf remedies, but none seemed to give me relief until I was Induced to try the old reliable Ayer'i Pills. I have taken onlf one box, but I feel like a new man. I think they are the most pleasant and casjrto take of anything I ever used, being so finely sugarcoated that even a child will take them. I urge upon all who are In need of a laxative to try Ayer's Pills. They will do good." For all diseases of the Stomach, liver, and Boweli, take '""» AYER'S PILLS PMptMdbyDr.J.C. AyerHCo., Lowell, Km. Every Dose Effective that itot Iw all •agnr oat into, these fellows nre in reh lion RgaidBt the DeUdoratio party. Let them go; we, aa a party, do have any use for men who have to paid to belong to it. Thin olsss belt to the Bepnblioan*, and tte sooner ti 1st Day. ISthbay. THE GREAT 30th REVIVO RESTORES VITALITY. Made a 'ell Man of Me. ay produces the above results ln',30 days. It act! poiyerf ully and quickly. Cures when all others tall. rdohgmou will regain their lost manhood, and old men will recover their youthful vigor by using BETIVO. It 'quickly and Burely restores Nervoua- nmsitOBt Vitality, Impotenoy. Nightly Emissions, Lrfst Power, Failing Memory, Wasting Diseases, and nil effects of Belt-abuse or eiceBsand indiscretion, v which, nnflts one lor study, business or marriage. It cotonly cures by starting at the seat of disease, but IB a 1 (treat nerve tonic and blood builder, bringing back the pink glow to pale cheeks and restoring the flro of youth. It wards off Insanity and Consumption. Insist on caving KEVIVO.no other. It can be carried in vest locket. By mail, 01.0O per package, or six for 85.OO, with a posl tlve written guarantee to cure or refund the money. Circular free. Address ROYAt MEDICINE CO., 63 River St., CHICAGO. ILL I For Sale at Carroll, Iowa, by J. W. Hatton, Druggist. Wf f^ *1f ••.^^ H ^^ • ^lr ^^ m v. ^KU.cta In 20 to 80 days by a, Magic Remedy, under guarantee, backed by ?500,000 capital. Post- guarantee. uncKeu o yuuu,««« ~- t ..v«.. - ~— tlve proofs and 100 page book, Illustrated . — ..„- a ----- — -^ e cured, free by man (all, our from life from people cured, free ii When Hot Springs and mercury Silicic Remedy will cure. COOK REMEDY CO. Complexion Preserved DR. HEBRA'S hannlcE!). At 'all 2'.::d for Circular. r. -• . . . <J. C. BJTTWKh & GO., TOLEDO. O. ^ "SnlioneBt opinion, ,....-0.,write to & CO., who bare baa uoarly fllly year/ .i & Co. rooelv. cial iwtlcolu tbu Hclenlllic Aiiinrlcnn, und B are brought wiaoly beforo tbe publlowlth. t cost to tbo Inventor, a'bls eploudld D»per. out cost to tbo Inven twed weekly, elegantl , Itlon.uiont . oeutu, Every numb In colon, und I plans, enabling! Mnvfif* fi*i" a" veikf *fiDcounon copies sent free. ^SulidSg BdlSou, montlily.»2.(A« TW. 6lug j a year, eiogle contain* beau- [rapbi of new to rtiow tbc i,™fk.»T^urewntr^tS Aadre" , 'SCO!.«KW Vouit. 3(11 iftoADWAT. OTHI:«. II <» th» BEST. Tbcre 1* nothing *"f iiii •o*«ll«d K». ilaublau vlilt-li lliuy lid* fi-tieu fur ISO. au now bo f UK ur people ar* known to have been killed and many are injured. The main portion of tha business center, bounded on the south by Third street, *on the north by the river front, on the west by Center street and on the east by Commercial street, is practically in ruins and the amount of damage is incalculable. The cyclone was accompanied by a terrific storm* and the stocks of goods in the business houses which were unroofed though not otherwise wrecked were destroyed by water. The storm struck the state penitentiary which stands on a liill in the western part of the city with fearful force, destroying the dining room, tearing down the stable and shops, unroofing the main cell building and demolishing the warden's office. Several convicts were seriously injured, one of whom died an hour afterwards. M«ny Bnildlngi Totally Wrecked. Down town the lightning struck the Martin block, corner of Spring and Second streets, totally wrecking the third floor. A man by the name of Eaton was fatally injured there. The Tilles building, corner Center and Markham, was unroof ed and a part of the fourth floor of Qleason's hotel was blown away. At Main and Second the tope 'of several adjacent buildings lie piled up in an indescribable heap. The -worst damage, however, was done to property on Markham and Commerce streets. Nearly every building in that district is unroofed and many are totally wrecked. Tho large 3-story building at Markham and Cumberland occupied by B. H. McCarthy & Co. is a total wreck, as is also the a-story building on the opposite corner, occupied by Mai Elkans as a saloon. The third story of the old Deming House was blown off and the several stores under it were flooded by water and filled with debris. The streets are filled with tin roofs, electric wires and other wreckage and it will be several days before the extent of the damage can be accurately known. The large cotton warehouse situated at Second and Scott, owned by J. H. Ba- cum, was wrecked. It fell on the Western Union telegraph office next door and wrecked it, thus cutting off all telegraph communication with outeide points. Rescuing parties are busy searching for the wounded, but a list of the casualties is unobtainable. Among those known to have been seriously and probably fatally injured are C. P. Monroe, member of Arkansas legislature, and - Eaton, Sam Smith, a prominent cotton buyer, is also badly wounded. Others are known to have been more or less injured, but names are not obtainable. Injured Receirlng Attention. Through the heroic services of Mayor Hall and Chief of Police Frank Mahon the injured and helpless are receiving the best of attention. The loss to property alone it is estimated will amount to at least $1,00(1,000. The damage to the insane asylum will reach $100,000. That at the penitentiary $OU,OUO. The Capitol and Richelieu hotels were badly damaged. The streets are covered with poles, wires and debris from the wrecked buildings. Six electric street car motors are pinioned on the track on Slain street with heavy raftings and poles and are a total loss. A reporter visited the penitentiary. The office of the main buildings were torn away, completely demolished. A stampede took place among the convicts, but Superintendent McConnell and his assistants soon succeeded in quieting them. Fortunately, 450 of the convicts had been taken to Sunnyside plantation some days ago, At the insane asylum was found the greatest wreck. The roofs of the main buildings were completely demolished and several wards caved in, destroying? everything inside. Several insane pa- •tients made their escape, but were captured. It is not known how many inmates were killed or injured, as many are supposed to be buried in the ruins. Dr. Jacob T. Ingrate, who came here several months ago from Mobile, Ala., to accept a position in the asylum, was killed. _ I'rofuwor HotU Filially Injured. NEW YOBK, Oct. a.— Professor Vin- ceuneuo Botta, tho wealthy linguist and one of the vice president)* of tho Union League club, was severely injured by a fall from tho third story window of his house. Four ribs wore fractured, his head severely injured uud right ankle broken. The fact that professor is 78 years old makes bis recovery very doubtful. MISS WALDEN, HALF-MILE CHAMPION In th« recent race at the Pastime Athletic CluVs track in St. Louis, ent race at te astme tec us rac n . , Walden demonstrated that women can ride and win bioyole races as well as men. . »U8 rede half a mile, standing start, in 1:28,. and under a twenty r«£ta«taand ef eated. field of five others, winning the championship, bhe u 20 years old, 5 feet A mcnei tall, and weighs 128 pound*. _ - T KJI'Ii'N LIM M 1 am now prepared to do all kinds of blacksmithing, horse shoeing, plow work and general repairing, , Wf\OON AARKER A first 1 elates Workman in wobd IB employed in the same build ing, and we are prepared to do all styles ot wagon and .carriage work and repairing. US A GAEL. JERRY LUCY, Proprietor. Shop*opposite mill, formerly occupied by Fred Franzwa. .M'KINLEV IN KANSAS CITY. Greeted by an Immense Audience In the Auditorium In That City. KANSAS CITT, Oct. 8.—Tuesday afternoon Governor McKinley was greeted at the Auditorium by one of the largest crowds ever assembled in this city, thousands being unable to get inside the building. Mayor Davis introduced the governor in a speech in which he eulogized Ohio and its famous citizens and said that unless the sigBJ of the times were wrong its present governor would two years henco be the leader of the Republican hosts. The sentiment was vigorously applauded. In his first sentence Governor McKinley struck a responsive chord. "Proud as I am," he began, "to be an Ohioan, I am prouder yet to be an American." Then he proceeded with his ^speech. Reference made to ex-President Harrison, Hon. Thomas B. Reed and the late James G. Elaine as the history of Republican tariff legislation waa recited, were warmly applauded as was the observation that, "We have not a single commercial competitor in the civilized world that does not rejoice over the passage of the Wilson bill." The governor said: "Senator Vest told you Monday night a story about a CORBETT ISSUES AN ULTIMATUM. Be Is Ready to Fight FltMlmmom and All Coiners In July. • BOSTON, Oct. B.—William A. Brady, manager of Champion James J. Oorbett, gave out an ultimatum to all whom, it might concern, in which he says: ...... "The Olympic club of New Orleans claims the right to declare Robert Fitzsimmons the champion,of 'the world if I io not meet him. They have no right to do this, but rather than give the oueer lot 6f sports who are spoiling for my defeat the satisfaction of having me declared ex-champion by default,! want to put myself on record as follows: I have JEoqled, this crowd twice before and am going'to take pleasure in doing it again. I do not propose that a foreigner shall take my title from me by default—a title which I honestly won by fighting men in iny class. • • • , ! "I am anxious to retire from pugilism, but the gang of queer aporte who are hoping I may be beaten, shall never have the satisfaction of saying that I showed the white feather. They say Fitzsimmons' money talks and that 1 am not the right kind of champion because I refuse to break legitimate engagements and fight every 'Tom, Dick and Harry* at the drop of the hat. Now let these men told you Monaay nigni a story BUUUL a who are seeking notoriety at my expense dog which came by express and nobody [ get together all the fighters in the world could tell where it came from or who it w ho have $10,000 to wager that I cannot was for, because it had eaten its tag. "- ' --"—'-" ~ —'—'"— °* He applied that story to the Populist party, but he might better have applied it to this Wilson law. Everybody disowns it, a»d yet you are asked to approve of it. Why, the Democracy of New York disowned , it formally and officially when it nominated for govor- nsr of that state Mr. David B. Hill, the only Democratic member of the senate who voted against it. "When I spoke in.this city two years ago, a gentleman in the gallery wanted to know what I thought of the 8-honr bill, a question then among workingmen was how to reduce the hours of labor. [Laughter and applause.] There is no trouble of that kind now. The workingmen are not looking for shorter hours now, they are looking for longer hours." Some inquisitive individual asked: "What's the matter with the A. P. A.?" The interruption was not well received, and there were cries from all Bf\R LOCK The Modern Writing Machine/ , Is the invention of geniae, ODfeHered by old-Mhool Ira- dltioDB. It hu been brought to perfection in ite meohanioal details by four years of experience, backed by ample capital, helped by praotioal men determined to apure no endeavor to mannfaotni* a high grade machine jrhioh iball produce the beet work with the lent effort and in the ehorteet Urn*. IU price may by a little higher than that ot othera, bat tbe Bar-Look it '' ' ..... ' ••'-•••"'•-"-•• parts of the theater, "Put him out." Governor McKinley paused for a moment before replying, then said: "The question we have to settle now, is wfwt is the matter with the country?" A burst of applause followed. At Urn olosp of his address, Governor MoKiulty spoke for a few minutes to a large crowd outside, then crossed the river to Kansas City, Kan., where he delivered another speech. RAILWAY <ViuiiflH>» Iliuwwhi) 41 lA UU NUV r of IbuHi chwii luucliluui fur (o buy tbu liEHT. Tlu-y aiv nl ully iiutdv on tlio i,»t wi nimiAKTKB KVKltY ONE, and our ituurunt uiwil wfBiwfiSnW w yearly «""/ uwu wto you fu:i iji-i liLslrveflvlu, UBoaWwroimU* Wo «*f» not 1>« Vtultnuia. ordur. U not for tl»i> l!"»tp ' ur ou r Of't . tt'$WllL%UVKR BUiucliluiiulyourUunw J'u,', '*: »jul.'J»il'"i,Tio/iii i «iiuiwli">4inr, <fw vt fUuiwu. »• i .1 j»v Tk^fwHVllE X 8E*SQ ] MilJHINE^ }1 "^ w>» wus w Huuthuru I'MOltto Ulllulul BAN FIIANOISOO, Oct. «.— B. 8. Pratt, iWBiulimt general aupoi'iutundout of tho Boulhern Pacinc company, has resigned, hiBfcsignutioiiU. tuke offoet iu December. Mr, Pratt has servod continuously for 1)0 years. It is officially announced thut uo now man will be appointed to illl tlio vacancy by Pratt's retirement, Cuw)>4l|f u Vur OWUUK OpvuvU. NEW CACTUS, Ky., Oct. 8.-Oeorgo Duiiny, Jr., aud W. C. Owens opuu«d thu fiuui>ulgu iu the Auhlaud district with u julut dobuU) buforu a lurue uudi- runt. ____ ___ win UUCUM jsauvtttiuu. JJuiiu<iUis, Oct. 8.— Archbishop Heu- wi*ey will uddrtes tho council of urch- bwiiHps tit Philttduli.hiu, Oot, l^.on "E<i- uculion." ACCIDENT AT OAKLAND. Biuoker Juinp< tho Track on a Drawbridge ami HoIU Into the lllver. OAKLAND, Cul., Oct. 8.—As tho local train'on the narrow guage road was approaching the Webster .street drawbridge Tuesday evening the last car, which was the smoker, jumped tho track. The engineer stopped the train.but beforo he was able to do BO the forward part of tbe train waa on the draw, and tho smoking car was being dragged over tlio ties, the coupling breaking just as the oar reached the ground and it rolled down the bank into the water. Wearly all ot tho passengers jumped from tho car be- foro it wont over and a dozen or more wore severely bruised. Fifteen passengers were in the oar when it left the track and fell into the water beside tho track. P. J. Kyley, employed by tbe Denver and Rio(rr«n4e agency here as ticket seller, won killed. Another body in the car has not yot been recovered, Captain J. O. Wilson of Ban Francisco is badly uurt. Several other passengers were injured, although not seriously. Four years ago a somewhat similar accident occurred at tlio wine place in which 18 people were drowned. It was Decoration Day and tho train was crowdod. Tho drawbridge WBB open, but'the engineer went right nhuad and the engine and one car plunged into tbe water. Missouri PftoUlo Trulu WrocUml, LKAVBNWOUTH, Got, B.—A «[,„„, train of eight coaoboj on thu Miuwuri Paoitto railroad loaded with pu^ougera loft hero ut 0 o'clock Tuwduy uvojUBg for Kunstw Olty, but ran into uu open switch in South Leuvenwovth, duruUMg thpuugino and soverul oars. KugLueor Alex MoCumbridge jumped und WW Bttvoruly out about thu fau«. J 'irouitu Lee Uluiiuhurd also jumped und gu«. tuiuud iiijurieu of the uriu. A colored boy named Josou llorriugton ut tbid city, who was stealing a rldu ou thu duoki, watt i'nt"llv.<iSWl»e<Uud will. dip. ^w-r.- » -"• defeat them, no weight or color barred. I will deposit $10,0011 with David Blanchard of Boston as an evidence of good faith and I will devote any one week after July 1 next to fighting one of them each night during that week. I mean this and this will be the last time I will ever train for a pugilistic contest. > "Now, you would-be champions, Robert Fitzsimmons, Peter Jackson, Ed Smith or Peter Maher, here is your chance. I will take Fitzsimmons Monday and after him first come, firstserved. I will fight for the Club offering the largest ptuse. I bar no onej this goes for all. The soreheads will say that this is a bluff, but my money talks and let some of them cover it if they dare. Now if New Orleans wants a fighting carnival and desires to settle who is champion of the world, this is their opportunity. , I hope to convince the public during the week arranged by tho club that I am what I claim to be, the champion heavy weight of the world." Fltznlmmon. Declared Champion. NEW OIIUSANS, Oct. S.—At a meeting of the mei|bers of the Olympic club Robert Fitzsimuions was proclaimed champion heavyweight of tho world. Oat to Piece* by _ra Insane Man. Moscow, Ida., Oct. 8.—A horrible butchery occurred at tbe county jail here. Joe Roberts, a United States insane criminal, literally cut to pieces with a knife Jolm-Witte, another United States prisoner awaiting trial for selling liquor to the Indians. Wltte was arrested at Couer d 1 Alene a short time ago. Roberts killed a fellow noldier at Fort Sherman two years ago and waa adjudged insane. A United States marshal has left with Roberta for the Washington (D. C.) insane asylum. The Best Typewriter Possible, And the only doable key-board machine that writee EVERY LETTER IN SIGHT. ENDORSED by those who nee it; ; R. <3. Dtm & Co., St. Paul, Minn. ••'••< Pinkerton National Detective Agency. (8) New York Central & Hudson River R. B. (10) Michigan Central R.R. Co. (10) Daenport . Daily Democrat. ; , . ... Davenport Daily Times. Superior Everiing 2'elegram. Rational Wall Paper Co. (7) And, thousand* of others. ON TRIAL in yoar offlee. and anleee yoa like it you ™" 11 ^™™™ 1 ™ pay nothing. 'Old machines exchanged Our Argument: . ' Sent on trial the Bar-Look has a ohanoe to epeak for ttaelt and to etand on ita own merite, which is jnet where we want tbe Bar-Look to etand. We take all the risk of its not pleasing you. Whatever typewriter yon buy, there are typewriter aeoreta yoa ehoald know. Oar catalogue oontaine them. Send a postal for it. The Columbia Typewriter Mfg, Co,, llCtU St., Lenox and Flttb avo., raw YORK. St. Paul Branch, OS East 4th Street. SENTINEL Has the Largest and Most Thoroughly Equipped JOB PRINTIHfi OUTFIT Convent Keueo Uvfaced, SAOBAMENTO, Cul., Oct. 8.— There la great indiguution here over the action of some unkuowu pereons, wup under cover of durknuw clofuctd the fence around the couvunt of tlio Bistors of Mercy, daubing it with tlio Icttore, "A. P. A," The letters uro in soino iuHtaiioo throe feet high and tho fence, which encloses the entire block, IB BO marked every 80 or 80 feet. Cltolurit nt Cou»t»i»tluo|i!«. CoNSTANTiNoi'tis, Oct. H.— Oholora bos brokeu out Uoro, Nothing Is known officially of tho outbreak, however, although Bovoral douths are known to have occurred. _ _ Vimr »n AvaluueU*. VIBNNA, Oct. «,— In the dUtrlot of Salzburg four inches of *now fell. Snow foil uninterruptedly for eight hour*. Thoro is grout fear of an avalanche. A»fc vur • B*celv«r. BiouxOiTV, Oct. 8,— An application won wade in tho dUtrlct court for the ttppoiiitmont of u receiver for the Olty and Suburban railroad. IN WESTERN IOWA. Letter Heads Note Heads Bill Heads Statements Envelopes Business Cards Wedding Stationery Ball Programs Oirculars Brief Work Sale Bills Everything <Joi>gfckT»tloui»IUU OBBAU BAWBS, IB., Oct. 8.~The Dav- eniwrt ABwooiutlon of Congregational ClmrchoB coiwouod in the First Oougre- gutioual church iu thU city with about 50 qulugittuH in uttouduutH). rtM.vou.uu I« to Uw tU(> Mi-AiuN, ill*., Out, liuve buuu luodo for » big rally by the UwocrttU in thia oity Qot. 10. Vio» Prwiiduut Bteveiwou will be the »rlnplp«* Remember the place and call on us when in need of anything in the line of printing. THE SENTINEL, Adams Street OARROLL, IOWA

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