Austin American-Statesman from Austin, Texas on July 4, 1906 · 4
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Austin American-Statesman from Austin, Texas · 4

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Wednesday, July 4, 1906
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4
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THE AUSTIN STATESMAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1901 The Austin Statesman Published Dally by Austin Statesman Company. Established 1871. Incorporated May 7. !i 6. Office No. 713 Congress Avenue, Austin, Texas. TELEPHONES. Business Office Editorial Kooms 163 Societv Editress 68 TERMS OF SUBSCitirTION. (in tho CAtv hv Carrier.) One month in advance. ........JO ?5 Three months in nrlvance.. J One year in advance 00 Six months in advance " (Bv Mall.) One Month in advance 2 One year In advance " 03 Sunday only, one year In ad- VflnrA .... 1 Semi-weekly, one year 03 Daily, evmr day and Sunday; Heml-WeeWy Statesman and Diversified Farmer, Issued Every Tuesday and Friday. Eastern Business Office. 42. 44. 4!. 49 and 60 "The Tribune" Building, New York Citv; Western rmnlnoss Offlr, 510-12 "The Tribune" Building. Chicago. The S. C. Beckwith Special Agency, Sole Agents Foreign Advertising. Entered at the Postoffice at Austin, Texas, as seoond-class mail matter. THE COMING STRUGGLE. The prosperity of this country Is very much like that of ancient Rome In the times of Caesar and Cataline. It has more wealth In fewer hands than any other country In the world. The number of poor people is growing even faster than the wealth of the rich people. But Cataline has come again and Caesar will be here tomorrow. As In old Rome the agrarian forces are stronger In numbers, and courage, and experience of the world than the pluto-cratlo forces. There Is no doubt as to what will happen when they And a leader etrong enough, to unite their factions Into one grand army of the discontented. AnJ unless the republican party can be dislodged by the bal-' lot as the democrats would have It done. It will before long be dislodged as the Roman senate was by Caesar at th head of an agrarian army. All patriotic men should unite with the party which has for more than a century advocated liberty by supporting the constitution. That is the only way to save the country from Caesar-Ism. For, as we have said, Cataline has already come, and Is preparing the way for military despotism under which the fortunes of the rich will be confiscated to furnish the means for paying the wages of a Praetorian guard. If the people can't have liberty and fraternity along with equality,, they will have equality without liberty, or fraternity. Socialism Is growing because there Is no Justice under the present government which acts In 'defiance of the constitution. Democracy Is the only remedy for socialism and plutocracy, THOSE PRESIDENTIAL TRIPS. There Is a great difference in the appropriation that congress makes to pay their mileage bill every session and the lump appropriation of $25,000 to pay the traveling expenses of the president. A congressman only receives pay for the double number of miles from his home to the national capital at 20 cents a mile. The president can expend his appropriation for traveling anywhere and can Invite his friends to accompany him. Ho can use the appropriation for hunting trips, for swinging around the circle and presenting the republican side of political contentions and In fact there Is no restriction on his use of the appropriation. What a good time congressmen would have, with such an unrestricted fund to draw upon and what legions of friends they would have, while It lasted. THE SOUTH AND THE TARIFF. The address of Festus J. "Wade before the Tennessee Association of bankers pointing out the enormous Increase in the trade of the south and the exploiting of its natural resources makes an extraordinary and wonderful showing of the increase in material wealth. The Southern states have made this great progress, although handicapped by the weight of tariff protection which has plundered her people of hundreds of millions of dollars without any corresponding return. All the south buys is Increased in price on an average of 47 per cent, which statistics show Is the average Increased cost of living since the republican ta riff was imposed in 1S97 to protect the trusts, hardly any of which combines are located within her borders. Cotton, her great staple, has no protection, .nor could it have. If the south was to have the making of the tariff schedules for the surplus, after supplying the United States Is sold in tho world's markets at the price the foreign spinner is willing to give. The protection to her few sugar and rice planters Is a curse to her people, making them pay double price tor those necessities, tbua help ing to add to the increased co.-t of living of all her people. The tariff on lumber mainly protects a few northern timber speculators that have invested in her forests and plunders every one that builds and all that rent by adding to the cost o building. With the tariff burden laying its heavy hand on all her people the prosperity of the south speaks eloquently for the industry and thrift of her people. With the tariff burden lightened, so as to produce only the necessary revenue for the government, how much greater would have been her material prosperity. The numberless millions extracted from pockets of white and Mack alike would have been added to the further Improvement of her fields and cities and unler such greater freedom her growth and greatness would be the wonder of the world. USELESS PROFESSIONS. The republicans of South Dakota at their lute state convention declared that the tariff "nbould be modified from time to time to meet changed conditions." The republican mem bers of congress from that state have been voting to stand pat and supporting; Speaker Cannon in packing the ways and means committee and refusing to recognize any member who proposed to modify the tariff, even on such articles as those on which the rate exceeds 100 per cent. If the republican voters of South Dakota really favor tariff revision they must elect democrats to congress and elect members of the legislature who will elect tariff reformers to represent the state in the United States senate. If j a majority of both houses of congress was composed of republicans pledged to tariff reform, such might be accomplished, but as long as a few lone and lukewarm republican tariff reformers attend republican caucuses and refuse to Join with the democratic members In forcing tariff revision, such declarations in convention are either child's play or intended to deceive the voters. A REPUBLICAN "ANGEL." The friends of Mr. Schwab of steel trust fame say he will try to break Into the political game as It Is played In Nevada. If he does not have better luck than he did trying to break the bank of Monte Carlo he may go broke. for those Nevada republicans have had lots of experience. Tho gambling element which controls the republican machine in Nevada will welcome such a lavish spender as Schwab and perhaps give him a run for his money. The old Huntington machine, being somewhat out at elbows, will Jump at most any "angel" that comes along that can grease its old corrupt wheels, and after It Is all over the republican grafters will have the money and Schwab the experience. No pass, no vote. No tips from the ship trust, no Ehlp subsidy. If the devil gets his dues there'll be no more G. O. P. Perfect streets are most esseallal to a perfectly beautiful city. No contributions from the banks, no deposits of public money without in terest No contribution to the campaign corruption fund, no "protection" from tho G. O. P. If Carnegie doesn't come down with a million for tho campaign fund, there'll be tariff revision next winter. Now that Bryan has made $150,000 nobody can accuse him of being visionary in the matter of finances. Just a few weeks longer now and the people will be In a position to know who the leading candidate is. The way the friends of the late White are taking to tall timber since Thaw killed him adds the humorou to tho truly pathetic. If the labor unions don't work for protectionist candidates, there'll be no eight hour law, no restriction of immi gration if the CI. O. r. can help it Vice President Fairbanks would cer tainly seem entitled to an appropria tion from a republican congress for himself and friends for traveling expenses. Oklahoma is coming Into tho Union with a 30,000 bushel wheat crop. It is very evident from this that the balance of Undo Sam's family will not have to feed her. The Smoot case appears to have been lost sight of by the republican senators until another session, and yet the republicans declare they are the party that does things. Since the republicans of Kansas resolved to let well enough alojje the farmers, to show their hostility to such a "stand pat" policy, have determined to add one inch to the length of their shirt tails. Private Secretary Loeb will soon retire to the shades of Oyster bay and try the virtue of the "simple life" for a season la $rej araUon for a further struggle with the republican grafting politicians next December. Bight in the midst of the boast of the republicans that they are going to stop the trusts comes the announcement that a big combine has been formed to control the price of butter and chickens. What will the "tennis cabinet" do when the presiient adjourns to Oyster Bay? But probably Garfield and Fin-chot and Murray will need rest from their arduous tennis duties and now have more time for the work the government pays them for doing. As the powder trust Is directly plundering Uncle Sam, we would respectfully remind President Roosevelt that it would be good policy to "bust" it, before his friend. Colonel Dupont of Delaware, has time to fix things in the senate. Only those with strong stomachs are eatingJUe packers' products nowa days and when Chemist Wylie gets in his work under the pure food bill there will be nothing left but starvation for the balance of us, after the vegetables and blackberry season is over. Good gracious, can It be possible that more than half of the $25,000,000 for the Papama canal has been expended befor it was appropriated by congress? That is about the way the republicans .have of making the "dirt fly" in advance of the men with the shovels. Is Secretary Shaw paying hla traveling expenses on his numerous political trips, or are the railroads furnishing him free transportation? There Is a large "secret service fund" appropriated every year by congress, at the disposal of the secretarj of the treasury, for which no sort of accounting is required. What is it used for? Socialism and anarchism are the true and essential products of the trusts. Material prosperity is only a by-product. The republican party is responsible for the essential outcome of its policies and principles, but it deserves no credit for anything else. In the growth of socialism and anarchy, as the true offspring of protectionism, we see the real port towards which Dingleylsm is steering the ship of state. The announcement that the city has failed in its first efforts to sell part of its refunding darn bonds should not be taken as an Indication that said bonds will not be disposed of to good advantage to some other customer. They are too good securities to go begging in the bond market. They would have been sold ere this but the committee waited on one purchaser only, and his rejection of the proposition forces them to seelc at this late day other buyers. BELL PICNIC IN AUSTI HIS SUPPORTERS ARE TALKING OF GETTING UP A RED HOT MEETING SOON, BUT NOTHING DEFINITE IS DONE YET. LANE TO BE A SPEAKER La Grange Lawyer and Statesman Will Issue Challenge for Joint Debate on That Occasion A Warm Time la Expected. The supporters in this city of S. K. Bell In the race for governor are talking of getting up a picnic and barbecue to be given soon. The feature of the picnic will be the appearance of Jonathan Lane of La Grange on the stump for the candidate. He will in the meantime lssuo a challenge to any speaker In the state to meet him at this meeting and explain why Judge Bell should not have the nomination for governor. Lane is one of the best known men in the state and Is said to be a fluent talker and a great orator. He is a great criminal lawyer and has had considerable experience as a member of the legislature. Should his challenge be accepted it will be by some of the best men on the other side, tvhich will make the meeting Interest ing In more respects than one. No definite arrangements have been made in the way of the date, etc., but it is understood that the matter will be taken up and arranged in a few days. SUN AND SNOW Sometimes Help the Hair to Go, In any changeable climate the hnir is apt to become brittle and to break oft stubby here and there. This makes a tin Ir dressing almost a necessity, especially to ladies. In using a hair dressing why not get the best, one that combines with it the efficiency In killing the dandruff germ, the germ that eats the hair off at the roots, causing what is called falling hair, and in time baldness. Newbro's "Herpicide" is that kind of a hair dressing. You have no Idea how delightful your scalp will feel, and how stylish your hair will appear after an application or two of Herpicide. It is certainly a wonderful inno- j vation as a scalp antiseptic and hair ' dressing. Sold by leading druggists. I Send 10c in stamps for sample to The ' Herrielde Co.. Detroit. Mien. Yates Hunter, special agents. NEW COURT ON FRIDAY FORMER MAYOR'S COURT DIED YESTERDAY AND CORPORATION COURT WILL BE INAUGURATED TOMORROW. OFFICERS QUALIFIED William Von Rosenberg Takes Oath of Office as Recorder and J. A. Richardson Will Act as Prosecuting Attorney. There will be no session of the city court until Friday morning. At that time the recorder's court will be Inaugurated and the former police court will be a thing of ihe past. William Von Rosenberg, Jr., who was elected recorder at the meeting of the city council Monday night, will take the oatli of office today and will peside at the initial session of the corporation court Friday morning. J. A. Richaid-son, the newly elected assistant city attorney, will be present and prosecute the cases In behalf of the city. Cal Brown, the day police clerk, will also act as clerk of the corporation court. This power was delegated to him at the meeting of the council Monday night The most serious question with the creation of the corporation court is what the city will do with the defendants who are unable, to pay their fines. In this connection It has been suggested that a rock pile be established and that the unfortunates who are unable to make up the amount - of the tine be given a job making little rocks out of big ones. Alderman Moore is in favor of this move and will at the next meeting of the council introduce an ordinance to that effect. A number of the other aldermen who were seen are also In favor of the proposition and will vote for it. This ordinance will Include women as well as men and in the event of its passage, hereafter, the negro female habituants of the police court, who have heretofore been lying their fines out in the city lockup, will be given a chance to exercise their physical powers in a telling manner. It is very evident that if the corporation court is to be a success some means will have to be provided by which the city will derive some benefit from the prisoners who are unable to pay cash lines. The city can not afford to feed the prisoners who will lie their fines out in jail, unless they make up the difference in labor on the streets. While, in accordance with the state law, the creation of the corporation court is the proper thing it is a very serious question as to whether or not it will prove a paying proposition to the city, more so than the present mayor's court. The corporation court has all the powers of the justice courts except as to civil cases and the fines will be comparatively the same as those assessed in the justice courts. This means that a drunk, iifsead of costing $5 as heretofore, will cotit the offender in the neighborhood of $lS, including the costs. It will naturally take some time to see how the new court will turn out from a financial Jtand-point. The recorder and assistant city attorney will receive a salary of $50 per month each for their services. Mayor Shelley was not opposed to the ordinance. MEETING OF THE OLD LANDMARK IN SESSION SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION, COLORED, HAS ADVANCED ALONG MANY LINES OF RELIGIOUS WORK. The Sunday school convention in connection with the Old Landmark association has been in session for two days at the First Baptist church (colored). The Sunday school work has advanced along many lines. Religious and moral instruction has been held before the body in an effective way. The Old Landmark association proper will open this morning at 10 o'clock at the convention hall, Fourth and Waller streets. One of the best convention halls In the state will be operted to the public today. The largest delegation in the history of the association is present. Hon. Webster Flanagan will deliver the welcome address in behalf of the city to the colored Baptists. Many of the best workers and safe leaders are present to help enlarge the Master's kingdom, such as: Rev. A. Barbour, the moderator; Rev. W. H. Littleton, Dr. D. A. Scott, Rev. P. W. Wesley, Dr. A. R. Griggs, Rev. O, E. Perpener. Rev J. E. Smith, Rev. S. H. Slivers, Rpv. F. L. Lights, D. A. Starkes, F. C. Collins, F, B. Williams. Professor Kelley Miller of Washington, D. C, will deliver a popular lecture to the citizens of Austin tonight at 8 o'clock at the convention hall. Special mu-:ic will be rendered. MODEST CLAIMS OFTEN CARRY TH I'i MOST CONVICTION. When Maxim, the famous gun inventor, placed his gun before a committee of judges, he stated its carrying power to be much below what he felt sure the gun would accomplish. Tho result of the trial was therefore a great surprise. Instead of disappointment. It is the same with the manufacturers of Chamberlain's Colic. Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy. They do not publicly boast of all this remedy will accomplish, but prefer to let the users make the statements. What they do claim is that it will positively cure diarrhoea, dysentery, pains in the stom ach and bowels and has never been known to fail. For sale by all druggists. RAILWAY SOLD. Velasco, Brazos and Northern Went to the Highest Bidder. Velasco. Texas Julv 3. The Velasco. Brazos and Northern railway was sold today at Angle-ton under orders of court by the receivers to the highest bidder. c t. Alexander, president of the road, became the purchaser at SS0.OO0. The judgment under which the road was sold amounted to 5236. BETTER THAN SPANKINO. Spanking does not cure children of bed wetting. If it did there would be few children who would do it. There is constitutional cause for this. Mrs. M. Summers, box -423. Notre Dame, Ind., will send her Lome treatment to sny mother. SSe asks no money. Write her today tt your children trouble you in this way. Don't blame the child. The chances are it. an't hels it fa n f tf l7 il 1 4 i L News of the State House General and Personal Gossip of . the Various Departments BEXAR COUNTY ASSESSOR ON INTANGIBLE ASSETS HE WILL NOT PAY STRICT ATTENTION TO AMOUNT OF INTANGIBLE ASSETS FIXED BY STATE TAX BOARD. Albert V. Huth, tax assessor of Bexar county , was here yesterday from his home at San Anton'o on business with the comptro 'er s department. Mr. Huth said he was now getting things in share for assessing the property in hib count for this year and the indications are there wi'l be a material irierea.-.e in the proptrty valuations of Bexar county. Mr. Huth was asked what he proposed to do with the list of intangible assets of the railroads and other corporations subject to the tax under the Williams intangible tax law, as furnished him by the state tax board. In answer Mr. Huth said that he was not going to pay strict attention to the amounts of intangible assets as fixed by the board. T'e law does not provide that the amounts fixed by this board must be adopted by the tax assessor or the board of equalization of any county in 'ie state. These amounts as found by the board are furnished to the assessors and are merely advisory, and the assessor may materially reduce the amount or increase it as he sees fit, being in most Leases more familiar with the particular conditions as they exist In the counties where the yare located. It is certain, according to Mr. Huth, he will not accept the figures of the board, but will render the intangible assets according to his own judgment, and may take the figures merely as a basis for rendering the intangible assets of the concerns taxable and subject to this law. When the assessor has rendered the intangible assets of these corporations along with other property, then the rolls are turned over to the state board of equalization and it again passes upon them, and approves or rejects the amounts already fixed. Then the representatives of the corporations involved are given an opportunity to appear before the board and protest before final action is taken. Mr.. Huth believes the Williams law in many respects unjust, as he says that in his county ha would venture to say that telephone companies have more intangible assets that telegraph companies, and still telephone companies are not taxed under this liw. He pointed out other defects in the law which he said smacks of, class legislation. FRITZ LANHAM. Governor's Private Secretary ia Expected Back. Fritz Lanham is expected back to day or tomorrow from his eastern trip, where he has been spending a month's vacation. . Mr. Lanham is the governor's private secretary, and as soon as he returns the governor will commence making his preparations to go on his vacation. The governor will be absent until about August 1. He will spend much of his time at his old home at Weatherford. During his absence young Mr. Lanham has visitejl New Tork and other eastern cities. ROY LEE WALKER. He Will Soon Be Married to Texar-kana Young Lady. Roy Lee Walker, quartermaster of; the Confederate Home, has gone to Texarkana, where tomorrow he will be united In marriage to Miss Wilmuth Frances Bradbury, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bradbury. Mr. Walker was accompanied to Texarkana by Will P. Brady of Austin. Mr. Walker is well known In Austin social circles and has many friends In state house circles who will extend congratulations on this auspicious event FINISHED ITS TASK. Board to Examine Applicants For Service in Medical Department The board of officers of the Texas National Guard, which has been In session In the office of State Health Officer Tabor to pass upon the qualifications of officers in the Gui.'-d for promotion and appointment in the medical department completed Its labors and the members of the board have returned to their respective homes. There were quite a number of applicants who stood tha examination, but the result as to who of the number successfully passed wU not be made public for some lime. II II Lp fLa OVER FOUR THOUSAND WARRANTS REGISTERED FIRST OF THE MONTH CAUSES THE DEFICIT TO GET LARGER. ALL CONFEDERATE WARRANTS ARE BEING REGISTERED. Within the past two days there have been over 4000 warrants registered in the treasury department, 3000 of these warrants being Confederate pension warrants for the old soldiers. As there is no cash in the state treasury with which to pay these warrants, it becomes necessary to register them. After they are registered these warrants are mailed to the pensioners throughout the state and are cashed by local banks at a discount cf about 2 per cent, (which, after all, ioes not work such a hardship on the receivers of these pensions. The other warrants represent in a great measure those of the cierlts of the various state departments who were paid off a df.y or two agj. The local banks and moneyed institutions of Austin are cashing these warrants at a small discount, which proves quite a convenience to the clerks and other employes of the state government TERRELL COUNTY IS TO HAVE FINE COURTHOUSE COUNTY COMMISSIONER OF THAT COUNTY CONFERS WITH THE ATTORNEY GENERAL ABOUT BONDS TERRELL IS NEW. Charles Downie, a member of the commissioners court of Terrell county, was here yesterday afternoon and had a conference with Judge I. Lovenberg, Jr., oiiice assistant attorney general, relative to a proposed issue of bonds. Terrell county is a new county cie-" ated by an act of the last legislature and is taken out of a part of Pecos county. The proposed issue of bonds is for $30,000, and the funds to be derived from the sale of the bonds ore to be used in the construction of a court house at Sanderson, the county seat. This is the first evidence of indebtedness to be created by this county, which is the youngest county in Texas. Mr. Downie said that the affairs of the county are fast assuming a definite shape and before long Terrell county will be among the list of prosperous and up to date counties in Texas. The bonds will no doubt be approved at an early date and then work on the new court house will commence. CHARTER FILED. Two New Corporations Will Do Business in the State. The charter of the following corporation was filed yesterday in the state department by Secretary . of State Shannon: Nevada Gin Company of Fort Worth, with a branch office at Nevada, Collin county, capital stock, $10,000; purpose, the operation of cotton gins. Tlie incorporators are J. E. Davis, Thomas B. Gilliland, Brown Harwood, W. H. H. Caldwell and Arthuf P. Duggan. Burleson Realty and Trust company of Waco, capital stock, $20,000; purpose, the buying and sellis.7 of r$ estate and the accumulation and loan of money. The incorporators are R. A. Burleson, R. H. Hill and E. E. Cammack. QUARTERLY REPORT FILED. Clerk ConneHy of Supreme Court Turns Cash Into Treasury. Fred C. Connerly, . clerk of the supreme court, has Just filed his report in the comptroller's department for the quarter ending June 30. of the fees collected from all sources by that court for the past three months. The report shows the total amount of fees collected ito be $1993.50. Out of this amount $500 was paid to the deputy clerk. Captain J. S. Myrlck, as salary and the remainder, $1495.50, was deposited in the treasury department. This court ended its present term a few days ago and will not convene again until next October. There are a number of important cases still pending in this court which went over until the next term. Judge E. D. Cavin of Galveston was here yesterday on business with some of the state departments. Judge Cavin was formerly criminal district judge of Harris and Galveston counties. p5 U PTTEHr h pt n j9&k !0 W't? LlLL H 0 J? sP Eia i3 ADDITIONAL AWARDS ANNOUNCED YESTERDAY AUSTIN FIRMS COME IN FOR A BIG SHARE OF CONTRACTS FOR FURNISHING DRY GOODS FOR ELEEMOSYNARY INSTITUTIONS. State Purchasing Agent W. B. Anderson yesterday announced some additional awards of contracts for furnishing supplies for the eleemosynary institutions of the state. The contracts awarded yesterday are for dry goods and the awards are as follows: W. B. Smith & Co., Austin: Blankets, cotton, crash linen, oiled calico, cotton counterpanes, pillow casing, chambray, domestic, brown domestic, bleached domestic, plain . white flannel, blue and gray flannel, bleached sheeting, brown sheeting and ticking for all institutions for a period of twelve months. Sanger Bros., Dallas: Cotton duck, outing flannel striped, for all institutions for twelve months. A. B. Frank & Co., San Antonio: Cheviots, counterpanes, damask cotton, brown cotton flannel, bleached cotton flannel, napkins, for all institutions for a period of twelve months. McKean, Eilers & Co., Austin: Blankets, cotton crash, checks, calico, cambric, cottonades, denim, brown drilling, damask linen, gingham staple checks, fancy gingham, fancy - dress gingham, solid dress gingham, for all institutions for a period of twelve months. BRASHER TAKES CHARGE. He Qualified Yesterday as Superintendent of Blind Institute. Professor H. M. Brasher, the newly appointed superintendent of the State Blind institute qualified yesterday as head of that institution. He filed his bond in the county clerk's office after being passed upon by the attorney general and approved by the governor. Not any material changes In the policy of the institution are contemplated under the superintendency of Professor Brasher. He has been connected with the institution for many years and is thoroughly familiar with his new duties. Professor H. L. Plner, the superintendent who resigned some time ago, has gone to Sherman, where he will reside. DETACHMENT OF CAVALRY. More Troops Reached Camp Mabr Early Yesterday Morning. The adjutant general's department was advised yesterday that another detachment of troops from Fort Sam Houston had reached Camp Mabry and gone into camp for the summer. This was a detachment of cavalry consisting of a little over a dozen men. They came by rail and unloaded at Camp Mabry. Adjutant General Hulen did not accompany the' committee from this city to San Antonio to officially extend an invitation to General McCaskey, commander of the department of Texas, to attend the coming maneuvers. Permission Was Granted. The adjutant . general yesterday granted permission to the Burleson Guard of Caldwell, Texas, to attend a big Fourth of July celebration today at Burton. The company were permitted to go fully armed and equipped. It is reported that there will be a cede-' bration on a grand scale at tnat place today. DEPARTMENTS CLOSED. No Business Will Be Transacted Today at State House. The state departments will be closed today on account of the Fourth of July which is, of course, a legal holiday. No business w-ill be transacted at the state house and the clerks will take occasion to spend the day at home or on private picnics. Notice of Hearing. The railroad commission yesterday issued the following notice of hearing: It is ordered that notice be and tha same is hereby given to all railroad companies operating line of railway In this state, and all other parties interested, that the railroad commission of Texas will, on Tuesday, August 21, 1906, at its office at the capitol at Austin, take up and consider the matter of an application submitted to said commission on behalf of certain railroad companies of this state and asking for a readjustment of rates apply- (Continued on Page 5.).

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