The Daily Journal from Fergus Falls, Minnesota on March 6, 1974 · Page 7
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The Daily Journal from Fergus Falls, Minnesota · Page 7

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Fergus Falls, Minnesota
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Wednesday, March 6, 1974
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Page 7
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A way to communicate Fergys Falls (Mn.) Journal Wed., Mar. 6, 1974 From poetry to successful songwriting By BILL BANK Area News Editor STAR LAKE - Valliere Hancock became a published songwriter this week mainly because, "nobody could understand my metaphysics." That is, her special way of defining and explaining the world. In brief explanation, a song she has written, entitled, "I Never Knew," is scheduled to be released soon in an album called "The Now Sounds of Today." But it's Valliere Hancock herself, and what led up to this event, that is peculiarly fascinating. Mrs. Hancock had been writing poetry for years, really putting her soul into it. Then one day a good friend, also a poet, said he simply couldn't understand what she was trying to say. Apparently, she said, neither could a lot of other people. "Well, I thought, if he doesn't understand my words maybe I should use another medium. So 1 started writing what I call folk ballads," she explained. She immediately set out to write music that would be VALLIERE HANCOCK popular with many people. That was in 1960. Valliere Hancock never does anything halfway and she would have succeeded in getting a song published for national release if it took her until 1990. She is the most extraordinary blend of diverse cultures, ideas and beliefs one can imagine. Consider, for example, some of the people who have influenced her music. First, and foremost, Nat King Cole. Then, in varying degrees, Harry James, Buffy St. Marie, Johnny Mathis, Ravi Shankar and Lawrence Welk. It isn't hard to understand, she reasoned: "Music is a universal expression, a way of communicating a universal feeling, like romantic love, for example. I like rock and roll because it broke molds of conformity — led to new creativity — but now the pendulum is swinging back to melody and mood music again. Music simply expresses what people feel at a certain time." It is just as tangible as any other mode of expression, she believes. It evokes a feeling on a level where all people can understand it. Born in Limoges, France, Valliere came with her family to Fargo at the age of 1. Since then she has: —attended business college in Fargo. —Moorhead State Teachers College. —Simultaneously attended a secretarial school in Chicago and studied Oriental philosophy Snow blowing from Rockies By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Snow blanketed the northern Rockies today and rain soaked parts of the nation's midsection. Skies were clear and temperatures mild elsewhere. Five inches of snow fell at West Yellowstone, Mont., late Tuesday and winter storm warnings were issued in Montana and North Dakota. Thundershowers extended from eastern Oklahoma to the Middle Atlantic coast, and rain also fell in Oregon. But clear skies reigned from the central Plains to the Northeast and also in the Southeast. Temperatures before dawn ranged from 73 at Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to 5 at Cut Bank, Mont. Some other reports: Anchorage 9 cloudy, Atlanta 57 clear, Boston 43 clear, Buffalo 39 clear, Chicago 47 clear, Cincinnati 42 clear, Cleveland 44 Julie will be honored WASHINGTON (AP) — Tricia Nixon Cox will accept the 1974 Republican Woman of the Year award for her sister Julie Nixon Eisenhower. The President's younger daughter is still recuperating from a major operation Feb. 14 and will be unable to attend the ceremony at a luncheon of the Women's National Republican Club in New York Saturday. clear, Dallas 71 clear, Denver 36 clear, Detroit 41 clear, Honolulu 72 rainshower, Indianapolis 41 clear, Kansas City 52 clear, Los Angeles 54 clear, Louisville 50 light rain, Miami 72 clear, Minneapolis-St. Paul 44 cloudy, Nashville 54 partly cloudy, New York 45 cloudy, Philadelphia 48 cloudy, Phoenix 50 clear, Pittsburgh 38 clear, St. Louis 49 cloudy, San Francisco 48 cloudy, Seattle 35 clear, Washington 54 cloudy. MARKETS NEW YORK BUTTER AND EGG MARKET NEW YORK (AP)-(USDA) — Wholesale egg offerings fully adequate on large, light on mediums. Demand slow to fair Wednesday. Wholesale selling prices based on volume sales. New York spot quotations follow: Whites: Fancy large (47 Ibs min) 6165. Fancy medium (41 Ibs average) 57-60. Fancy smalls (36 Ibs average) 42-44. farm news « . . . rrawi ind tipt for are* firmeri. Phosphorus needed, difficult to purchase from an Indian Yogi (in I960) —taught in several rural schools in the Pelican Rapids and Dent areas. —helped her husband raise silver fox and mink on a farm near Dent. —written reams of poetry, some of it published in anthologies. —and now become a published songwriter. Yoga is an indispensable part of her daily routine. "I meditate every day," she says. "I consider it a religious exercise. I've studied the religions of the world and I see they are all in harmony." Her words and music come to her all at one sitting, she says, apparently in a free-flow pattern while she meditates. She keeps writing utensils around the house in strategic locations so she can immediately record the results. "It's a wonderful world we're living in," she confides. "An age of outer space and inner space." On March 2 she received word from her publishing company that a contract for the rights to her song was in the mail. That came as no surprise to her. On that date Jupiter moves into Pisces for a year's stay, which only happens once every 12 years. It's the first time in our lifetime this has happened while Neptune, the ruler of Pisces, is transiting through Sagittarius, the sign ruled by Jupiter. Mrs. Hancock believes that all this brings about a great harmony between Neptune, the planet of idealism, and Jupiter, the planet of optimism. When all that happens things have just got to come out right. Mrs. Hancock is not at all satisfied with much of her work and has no intentions of resting on her past accomplishments. She plans to continue to strive toward total perfection in her work. If there is, indeed a universal thread uniting the cosmos, this woman, this curious mixture of Tom Jones, Yoga, swing music and mysticism, migi,; some day reveal it to us. MARKETS —THE 1 NEW YORK (AP) — (USDA) — Butter steady. Prices unchanged Wednesday. LOCAL HOG MARKET Market: 1.50 lower butchers; sows 1.50 lower; Base number 3 butchers 210-240: 35.50; Closely sorted meat type butchers 210240: 36-36.50; Sows 270-300: 3232,50. Boars: 50 lower, 22-26. Dairymen who are finding phosphorus supplement hard to find are reminded that cows need phosphorus supplement, even if it is hard to buy. "Don't shortchange your cows on phosphorus, even if it costs you a little more," emphasizes Mike Hutjens, extension dairyman at the University of 'Minnesota. "In the long run, you'll get the extra investment back in more milk production, satisfactory reproduction performance and improved herd health." In most areas in Minnesota, dicalcium phosphate, monosodium phosphate and many commercial mineral supplements are not available. However, don't feed fertilizer-grade phosphorus to dairy cows, Hutjens stresses. Fertilizer-grade phosphate may contain toxic compounds which would be unhealthy for the cows and, in addition, may appear in the milk. Fertilizer- grade phosphate may also contain nitrates which could poison dairy cows. Certain commercial fertilizers, specifically diam- monium phosphate, are very intolerable, according to recent University of Minnesota trials. Hutjens suggests considering these alternatives: --switch to a commercial mineral supplement similar to the previous mineral program—even if it costs more. If you were feeding dicalcium phosphate (21 per cent calcium and 18 per cent phosphorus), try to get an 18 per cent calcium—18 per cent phosphorus mineral. —check the phosphorus level guaranteed on the tag of the new feed you're switching to. If the percentage is lower than your previous mineral, adjust the amount. Example: If you are mixing 20 pounds of 20 per cent phosphorus mineral in each ton of grain, mix 40 pounds of a 10 per cent phosphorus mineral per ton. —consider steamed bone meal since it has 30 per cent calcium and 14 per cent phosphorus. Some cows may not eat bone meal on a free choice basis, but mixing it in the grain should work. —some protein supplements contain additional phosphorus. Take this into consideration. SOUTH ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) - (USDA) - Cattle and calves 4,400; trading on slaughter steers uneven, weights 1200 Ibs and lighter mostly yield grade 2-3 active, 1.00-11.50 higher; steers 1150 Ibs and heavier of yield grade 3-5 slow, steady; slaughter heifers fairly active, 50-1.00 higher; slaughter cows slow, 50-1.00 lower; bulls slow, mostly 1.00 lower; choice 10001200 Ib slaughter steers 41.00 43.00; two loads 1272 Ibs included at 42.00; 1150-1325 Ibs 39.00 41.00; mixed high good and choice 900-1200 Ibs 39.5041.00; choice 900-1100 Ib slaughter heifers 39.5CW1.00; mixed high good and choice 38.50-39.50; utility and commercial slaughter cows 31.50-33.50; cutter 30.00-31.50; canner 26.00-30.00; a few yield grade 11700-2000 Ib slaughter bulls 38.50-41.50; yield grade 1-2 1450-1850 Ibs 36.00 39.50. Hogs 8,000; barrows and gilts market very slow in developing; early sales unevenly 1.00-2.00 lower but not fully established at 10 a.m.; 1-2 190-250 Ibs 37.00-37.25; a few shipments 37.50; 1-3 190-250 Ibs 36.00-36.50; a few 37.00 early; sows not established; boars 50-1.00 lower, 27.50-28.50. Sheep 1,000; market slow in developing; few early sales slaughter Iambs barely steady but market not fully established; slaughter ewes steady; feeders mostly 50 lower; a few- choice and prime 90-100 Ib wooled slaughter lambs 39.0040.00; a shipment 92 Ibs 40.50; utility and good slaughter ewes 15.00-18.00; a few 18.50; choice and fancy 65 90 Ib feeder lambs 36.50-37.50; good and choice 35.50-36.50. MINNEAPOLIS GRAIN MARKET (forMarchS) MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (AP) — Wheat receipts 131 year ago 208; Spring wheat cash trading basis unchanged; prices down 20 cents. No. 1 dark northern 1117 protein 5.62-5.71. Test weight premiums: one cent each pound 58 to 61 Ibs; one cent discount each '2 Ib under 58 Ibs. Protein prices; 11 per cent 5.62; 12, 5.62; 13, 5.64; 14, 5.68; 15, 5.70-5.71; 16, 5.70-5.71; 17, 5.705.71. No. 1 hard Montana winter 5.64. Minn-S.D. No. 1 hard winter 5.64. No. 1 hard amber durum, 8.00-9.00; discounts, amber 20-80; durum 70-1.50. Corn No. 2 yellow 2.84^-2.86^. Oats No. 2 extra heavy white 1.53. Barley, cars 148, year ago 79; Laker 2.56-3.60; Blue Malting 2.56-3.58: Dickson 2.563.60; Feed 2.35-2.55; Rye No. 1 and 2 3.35-3.45; Flax No. 1 11.25; Soybeans No. 1 Yellow 5.72; WEATHER Mar. Weather 1973-74 Pep 0 .02 0 0 0 — 197J- W-n Pep 7 27 28 22 26 0 0 T .01 0 LOCALGRAIN MARKET (Wednesday, March 6) No. 1 Wheat 5.13 No. 2 Oats 1.29 Corn 2.52 New Barley 3.25 Flax 10-'0 Soybeans • 5.41 NEWYORK POULTRY MARKET NEW YORK (AP) -(USDAt — Dressed turkeys, U.S. grade A, ready-to-cook, frozen, f.o.b. or equivalent: Trading generally quiet, except for a fair interest on hens where distributors were filling inventories for retail chains or looking to cover needs for promotion. Offerings of institutional weight young toms ample for a light demand. Sales of U.S. grade A, frozen: fryers-roasters 4-9 Ibs 54 cents; young hens 8-16 Ibs 51'i-53. Fergus Falls Alex'dia, cldy Bemidji, cldy Duluth, cldy llibbing, cldv Int. Falls, fair Redw. Falls, cldy Rochester, cldv St. Cloud, cldy" 49 30 48 40 48 38 43 36 47 29 45 33 53 41 48 37 48 34 STUDY AREA — Books on Yoga can be found among copies of songs Mrs. Hancock has written over the years. Without meditation, she says, she could never wrile the songs. (Journal photos by Bill Bank) Rotation bill is defeated ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) - DFU'rs beat back a Republican attempt today to call up a ballot rotation bill for consideration by the full Minnesota Senate. The party-line vote was 38-25. All DFLers—including legislative candidates—will be listed first on the 1974 general election ballot and Republicans will be placed second. Sen. Mel Hansen, R-Minneapolis, attempted to withdraw his bill from the Senate Transportation-General Legislation Committee and bring it to the floor. His bill would have rotated the first position between GOP and DFL candidates. Under an 1893 law, the candidate whose political party received the most votes in the last general election gets the first position on the ballot at the next election. Some studies have indicated that the first-position results in a voter advantage. The 1973 Legislature added legislative candidates to the statewide ballot, where candidates are not rotated. Republican Secretary of State Arlen Erdahl has brought a lawsuit in district court challenging the nonrotation law. DFLers said the ballot rotation issue was complicated and should be studied and suggested the 1975 Legislature deal with it. Jos. Felix Sub-station observer National Weather Service NORTHWEST FORECAST Minnesota: Strong northwesterly winds developing southeastward over the state by afternoon. Cloudy with scattered light snow or rain north and variable cloudiness with a few sprinkles south today. Turning much colder north and colder south portion by afternoon. Partly cloudy west and south, mostly cloudy northeast and much colder tonight and Thursday. A few snow flurries north tonight and northeast portion Thursday. Highs today 32 to 46 north, 46 to 56 south. Lows tonight from eight below to five above extreme north to 15 to 20 extreme south. Highs Thursday 12 to 25 north, 25 to 32 south. North Dakota: Stockmens' advisory. Cloudy and colder today. Snow flurries today and tonight. Much colder tonight and Thursday with near cold wave conditions. Highs today mid teens northern portion, lower to mid 38s south. Lows tonight around zero northwest and around seven above southwest. Highs Thursday mid teens northwest to lower 20s southeast. South Dakota: Stockmens 1 advisory. Increasing cloudiness and turning colder with a chance of snow flurries today. Highs today upper 30s north to lower 50s south. Cloudy and much colder tonight with a chance of light snow west and a chance of snow flurries elsewhere. Lows tonight in teens. Mostly cloudy and continued cold Thursday with a chance of light snow. Highs Thursday 20s north to low 30s south. WEATHER RANGE High Low Pr. .01 Extended forecast Minnesota: Mostly cloudy Friday through Sunday. Chance of snow north through Sunday with some rain or snow south Friday and Saturday and southeast Sunday. Not as cold Friday and Friday night with no large temperature changes Saturday and Sunday. Highs 25 to 35 north and 35 to 42 south. Lows 5 below to 5 above extreme north to 8 to 18 south Friday becoming 10 to 20 north and 20s south by Saturday. North Dakota: Mostly cloudy and cold with little day to day temperature change. Chance of light snow over the state Friday and mainly east Saturday. Highs mostly 20s and lows 5 to 15. South Dakota: Cloudy with snow Friday and Saturday and cloudy Sunday. H & L OK HARDWARE "THINK SPRING IT'S NOT TOO EARLY" WE ARE AN AUTHORIZED LAWN BOY DEALER BUY YOUR Scotts Fertilizer NOW WHILE STOCKS ARE COMPLETE It's easy with Scotts TURF BUILDER PLUS '2. A simple application of PLUS-2 v/;il make car.de- ions, ciover, black med:c and other s:rn'!c:r ; weeds shrivel and disappear, roots and a''. The : full feeding in Scotts TURF BUILDER PLUS-2 v.i;i .encourage your lawn lo grow th-ck, storciy md j fill in where the weeds used to be! 15,000 SQ. FEET.. Free Garden Gloves 10,000 SQ. FEET. 5,000 SQ. FEET. $ 14 95 SJ95 2C6 WE HAVE COMPLETE STOCKS OF: Plumbing and Electrical Supplies. Bulk Nails. Bulk Chain. Rope. Bulk Bolts, Screws and Nuts. We cut and thread pipe! WE CUT GLASS TO SIZE! H&L HARDWARE 'Home Owned and Home Operated" PHONE 736-5201 120 W. Cavour - City Center Shopping Center - Fergus Falls OPENMONDAYTHROUGH FRIDAY FROM8:MA.M T09-OOP M OPEN SATURDAYS FROM 8:00 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. — YOUR COMPLETE HARDWARE STORE —

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