The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 8, 1953 · Page 9
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June 8, 1953

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, June 8, 1953
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Page 9
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MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1953 Rl.YTI1EVn.LE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE IflNl Tfct World Today— Eisenhower Asb Shakeup Of Economic Advisory Council By JAMES MAKLOW WASHINGTON (AP) — The title itself — Council of Economic Advisers to the President — sounds like Operation Icebox. It raises a vision of man so aloof from ordinary feelings that they no longer converse, but exchange ideas in the frigid language of arithmetic: 'plus and minus. But the original three-man council under former President Truman had the usual human difficulties: differences in opinions and tactics. And the public knew about the differ- •V.ences, which is more than it may be able to learn about the: kind of council President Eisen- "hower lias in mind. Congress created the council In:on tbo recommendations of the be avoided by amicable agreement 1946. giving the three men a full- board too. Since the thinking of the council time job of watching the economy and advising the'Presidont on policies for keeping the country prosperous. The act. establishing the -council said it should have a chairman and vice chairman. fl lThe first chairman was Dr. Edwin G. Nourse, who described himself as a "liberal" with both feet .on the ground. Vice chairman was Leon J. Keyserling, who came into the government with the Roosevelt New Deal, The third man was John D. Clark. All were appointed by Truman. When they sent their recommendations to the President, and disagreed, they could say so. This was a public document. And they disagreed in more ways than one. Keyserling, for instance, thought the council members should testify before congressional committees in support of Truman programs. Nourse thought the council should stay clear of such entanglements. House Resigns Nourse resigned in 1949 and Keyserling headed the council until the end of the Truman administration. It may have been due to the confusion of settling down in a new Job but when Eisenhower first took over he seemed all for getting rid of the council. He sacked its professional staff. Congress acted more than willing to.go along by cutting off money for the council. Eisenhower picked Dr. Arthur P. Burns, former Columbia University professor of economics, to be his economic adviser. Eisenhower then told Congress he wanted to revive the three-man council, with all new members, of course. Burns seems the likely man for chairman. But Eisenhower said he wants no vice chairman. He said he wants .the chairman to report to the President. Does this mean, the other two council members can't even sign the report or express publicly any differences of view? Inside the administration it was said this Is a question to be answered later, A rule of public silence on the oilier two council members might h"ve the effect of turning the council into one chairman with two assistants under his thumb. This would be the reverse of what j Nourse had. There is no doubt Eisenhower wants the chairman to be boss. Wants Two Groups fi fact, he gave the chairman two hats because, actually, it seems, Eisenhower wants not one . but two groups of economic nd- , risers. For, in the same message to : Congress about his plans for the . council, he said he also wants this: An advisory board on economic growth and stability, made up of the heads of several government departments and agencies, or their representatives; And the President announced that the, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers also .will be chairman of the advisory board. The President at the same time outlined a powerful role for this dual chairman: He would not only report to the President on the recommendations of the council but might not always coincide with the thinking of the board, the chairman might sometimes find himself among all concerned. The idea of the board really formalizes what was done without title by the old council whose members consulted regularly, in in a dilemma. But inside the ad- making up their recommendations, ministration it was hopefully sug- j with the heads of the various ftgen- gesCed this kind of problem could i cies dealing in economic problems. New Control On Red Trade WASHINGTON (XP) — The TJ. S. government has tightened its curbs on trade with Communist China by j issuing an order, effective July 6, denying American fuel to ships or planes headed for Red-held ports in The Orient. American traders are prohibited from calling at Red China ports and the .government Is urging its Allies not to send strategic goods to Communist countries A new export control regulation announced yesterday will require special Commerce Department approval before any foreign ship or plane going to "Red China can get fuel from a U. S. port. Samuel W. Anderson, assistant Secretary of Commerce,'said: "Applications for such approval will not generally be granted." persons, injuring 40 and causing millions of dollars in damage in Southern and Western Japan. Gales and torrential rains sank 34 small vessels, wrecked nearly 200 houses and caused 829 landslides. More than 1,200 homes were flooded and 275 bridges washed out- Japanese estimated the damage at around 20 million dollars. ROYAL SERVICE-MIS. Louise Cochran excitedly telephones friends in Houston. Tex., to tell them that her cablegram to Queen Elizabeth II paid off. Mrs. Cochran decided belatedly to go to the Coronation. Her friend? «ave her the horselaugh. "You'll never find a room," they said. Mrs. Cochran cabled Queen Elizabeth asking her to j»e; her accommodntionf. A odace secretary cabled that a room awaits her ai a London notel. T/ie Name Sticks INGRAHAM, IJI. (ff) — Neighbors have reason to call a farm near here "John and Virginia's place." John and Virginia Bryan were the original owners. Later, John and Virginia Cox leased the place. Now the farm belongs to John and Virginia Woodard. Death Steals Great Event LOS ANGELES Iff)—Annn Levin, 68. chnrtccr notress of the Jewish Theater, had nwMted the day when the fjreat ot ihc theatrical and film world would pay formal tribute to her actor husband. He Is Miclinl Michalesko. a noted performer In the Jewish Theater. The te.slimonial, dinner was held Saturday at the Wilshlre Ebell Theater. Paul Muni, George Jessel and Shelley Winters were nmons the hundreds who attended. But Michalesko, (he guest of honor, was not present. His wife, ill nearly six months, had died at noon that day. Cop Saves Child's Life NEW YORK (fll — An hysterical mother pulled her unconscious 8- monlh-old daughter from a bathtub and ran screaming Into the street. The cries of Mrs. Lui'rezia Kocl- eriquez attracted Patrolman Thomas Sommers, who grabbed the baby from the mother's arms and RHVC the child artificial respirations. In this way Sommers yesterday saved the life of tiny Maria Rod- criuez. who nearly drowned when her mother left her In a bathtub and stepped out of the room momentarily. Read Courier News Classified Ads. Pnomp'inn 's the capital of Cambodia. THE NEW AUTOMOBILE LAW BECOMES EFFECTIVE JUNE llth See us and drive with security. Our insurance is not (he CHEAPEST, But you only gel what you pay for. Claim Service is the best. -FOR- "all that's good in insurance" CALL 3361 W. M. BURNS AGENCY Crash Kills Streetcar Conductor in L. A. LOS ANGELES </P)—A streetcar with a dead man at the controls carried terrified passengers a block yesterday after a violent collision with a heavy truck, The Impact killed the conductor- motorman, P. B. Sedcruist, 44. He slumped lo Ihc floor but the car continued for a block before his foot fell from the control pedal, automatically braking the car. The truck driver. Pete Shubin, 42, Truman Gttf f*ttn*t KANSAS CITY iJTi—A r»4-M4- whlte 15-foot war bonntt WH frt- senled last night to H»rrf •. Ttu- man to signify he now la an honorary Indian chief In tti« Okl*h*> ma Junior Ch»mb« at tribe. wai booked on suspicion at manslaughter. Nine itrcctoar (MUM*- gen were Injured, none Mrlouily. Mellow as Moonlight SMOOTHED BY NATURE TO THE PEAK OF OLD-FASH'N GOODNESS f Only CASCADE, gives you ill the richness :of the George A. Dickd 1870 formijU] KENTUCKY ST8AIGHT BOURBON GEO.A OirKEL OlST.Cf 1 ' OUISYIUE, KY .86 PROOF» * YEARS OUL Typhoon Hits Japanese Isles TOKYO If}—A typhoon was blowing Itself out today after killing 2t "Frosty" Is Coming to Town Soon! FLOORS Laid, Sanded and Finished! • Asphalt Tile • Rubber Tile • Linoleum Tile • • Inlaid Linoleum • Wall Tile Cabinet Tops Installed All Work Guaranteed Free Estimate EUBANKS and STOREY Phone 2239 Delivered locally- Highest-powered SPECIAL in Buick history. 6-passenger roomy. Mori comfort, richer interiors, a still finer ride, Yet thii beautiful new '53 Buick SPECIAL Sedan delivers for • just a few dollars more Jhan the "low-price" cars! It's the buy of th« year, and a thriller from the word go. Come in and see for yourself. y *2-door, 6-pasieng«r Sodcn, Model 48D, Illutltattd. Optional equip- 1| /ntn/, occciiOf/tJ, Jlofe and local /axei, if any, additional. Prices 9 may vary slightly In od/oInJrpg communlllei due lo thlppltig chatgt$. " 3 All price* sufa/ecf lo changewilhout notic*. Langston-McWaters Buick Co. HURRY! SALE ENDS JUNE Blh on GOOD/YEAR Tires the world's most wanted tires! Remember: this year, as in every year for 38 consecutive years, more people ride on Goodyear Tires than on any other kind! First choice tire of the auto makers! De Luxe and Super-Cushion by Goodyear Yen, leading car manufacturers, who really know tires, have selected this famous De Luxe Super-Cushion as original equipment for more new cars than an; other tire! 15% OFF for your used tire . . . UP TO 20 each depending on size Get set NOW for Safer Summer Driving! GOODYEAR TIRES your present tires worth up to . . . 12 85 each The Amazing New Miracle 15% OFF for your used tire . . . UP TO '6' dcprnrllnff on sire $£76 I each depending on size World's finest, most luxrioys tire All-Nylon Cord Double Eagle by Goodyear Superior to any other tire, »l anj price, In the 10 most Important aspects of tire service! Miracle All-Nylon Cards! Up to 4Z% greater mileage — safer, surer traction — the world's most luxurious ride. 15% OFF for your used tire . . . UP TO '12 85 each depending on size Don't miss this great opportunity to get famous GOODYEAR TIRES AT 15% OFF including white sidewoll tires! PAY AS LITTLE AS $1.25 A WEEK FOR FOUR TIRES! All-Nylon Cord Super-Cushion by Goodyear Up to 80% stronger than a standard tire—and safer—thans to the miracle-strength of All- Nylon Cords. Costs onl ya few dollar* more than a standard tire! 15% OFF for your used tire . UP TO Thejamoiis long-wearing low-priced Marathon 23 each depending 1 on siza by Goodyear This genuine Goodyear Tire is » (treat biff value at the lowest possible price! It gives you long, safe trouble-free mileage at a cost per mile that really saves your budget! Available in both standard and low pressure sizes GOOD-YEAR TIRES ' GOODYEAR SERVICE STORES Phone 2492 Blytheville

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