The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan on October 30, 1939 · Page 4
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The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan · Page 4

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PAGE FOUR THE DAILY NEWS—LUDINGTON, MICHIGAN MONDAY, OCT. 30, 1939. THE LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS Trademark Registered U. S. Patent Office with which is consolidated the Mason County Enterprise of Scottville, Mich. £l «»«T.«'«»lh*. »ave Sunday, at The Dally News Building, Bath Ave. •*•• Ludlngton, Mich. Entered as second class matter at post office, i, Mich., under act of March 3, 1897. _— •mv JR&**? < * ! ' llte < 1 v aMptttchei cr JS ?5 8 ?? bUsh _ ed tnereiM - AH right for republlcation of special dispatches and •» exclusively entitled to the use for republicatlon of all tchei credited to It or not otherwise credited In this paper and also the ._ 10«U newi items herein are also restivcd. MEMBER OF Associated Press Audit Bureau of Circulation Inland Daily Press Association WRITTEN FOR AND RELEASED BY CENTRAL PRESS ASSOCIATION If paper is not received by 6:30 p. m., telephone 4321 and prompt delivery will be made by messenger , i ... TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION * , Lnolngton: By carrier 15c per week. Paid in advance«°» r n£'*» m °P ths - By Mail: In tnAlngt£rt™,vri$*n&n XIhS!fl - OI) '« ««e months^Wfor one moth'. Outsfde '' $1 ' 25 {or LOGIC WON'T HELP In the face of the present fracas over the ocean-going City of Flint, we were especially interested in a communication in another paper several days ago posing this neutrality question : "I have never thought much of this business of barring American ships from trade, if the owner wished to send his vessel there. On the other hand I have been heartily in favor of anything that would pi-event the American shipper, in search of huge profits, from being able to yell for the Navy when he is in a tight place. "Why couldn't the cash-and-carry pi-ovisions apply to , any American ship bound to any belligerent or its colonies in any of the Seven Seas? Rut why shouldn't it be the law that when the ship goes into the danger zone proclaimed by the president, or when it is in the sen-ice of a belligerent, the American flag doesn't follow it? In other words, if American shippers want to gamble their vessels and if American citizens want to go into danger, why shouldn't they do so on their own? It sounds logical, at first. But just such an incident as that of the City of Flint shows very clearly what a ruckus one lone vessel, mistreated, can cause and'what international complications can result. So actually what would happen if an American ship with several hundred American sailors and passengers were to be sunk? No matter how much we might, logically, be justified in saying "we warned you," we would probably see red just the same. War isn't a matter of logic—if it were, there would never be any wars. It is always a matter of emotion. Hence, let us not hang many of our hopes for peace on the thin thread of reason. NOT AS B.AD AS PICTURED Fritz Kreisler, the violinist, says in an interview that he is sorrv for the young people of today. "there is no romance for them/' the famous musician was quoted as saying. "From the start, they are face to face with stern necessities, leaving no time for the foolish little rouxautic-tkiugs we did when T was young." Which leads us to wonder whether Mr. Kreisler has not fallen victim to an illusion common to the older members of eveiy generation. Certainly this is a pretty tough world, but in most respects hasn't it always been so? And haven't young people always found time for the foolish little romantic things? One of the fortunate facts of life, we have observed, is that most young people never feel quite as much pity for themselves as their elders feel for them. It's the older people, not the younger ones, who are inclined to lose a sense of romance. in Attaining Athletic Efficiency • •' •'--•-.-' • ' • ••• '. • -' -'• . • -,-.,-',«¥. BTNOPSIS . Peake, proprietor of Hill House, New England summer resort, is found I murdered by the "spite fence" erected 1 near h* property by her estranged I slater. Miss Ivy Newcomb. Previous to the murder the guests had been con| cerned about, the poisoning of one of i their number, Mrs. Rutherford, who I recovers; strange sounds of a prowler on the property, and the ransacking of one of the rooms. Those at Hill House besides Dr. Neal and Josie Peake, children of the dead woman, are Sally Gordon, spending her first vaca* tlon there; her close friends, Rhoda and her fiance Duncan; Dr. Paul and Pauline Rutherford, children of Mrs. Rutherford; Coral Easton, Bruce Orton and Joseph Barry. Josie is friendly with Alan Murray, who lives at Miss Ivy's, and that Infuriates her brother, Neal. He likes Coral Easton, for whom Josie has no use. The police begin th«lr investigation. The police chief enlists the aid of Miss Gordon, then introduces Captain Lancy, well-known detective, who has been called in to take charge of the case. As Captain l»ancy begins to question all of those at Hill House, Miss Ivy pays a surprise visit. During a heated argument Miss Ivy collapses from shock and is taken home. Then Captain Lancy begins his questioning. CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE CAPTAIN LANCY'S stern ques- ,tlon: "If that Is true, what were you doing ten miles the other side of Winnetaumet at four-twenty yesterday afternoon?" paralyzed me. I could only stare blankly at him while thought after thought, disjointedly and terrifying, flashed through my mind. I knew why I waa ten miles the other side of Winnetaumet but, by omitting that part of my story when I first told it, I had put myself into a pretty pickle. Who would now believe that I had merely lost my way ? Coral Easton's voice recalled me to the fact that the detective was waiting for my answer. I was about to speak, but the words she spitefully uttered closed them again. I flashed a swift glance at her. A sarcastic, triumphant expression waa on her face. "Ir thought it was funny," she was saying, "that all those things happened as soon as SHE got here." The emphasis she placed upon the pronoun was unmistakable. My blood boiled. Again I tried to speak and again the words died in my throat. Captain Lancy's eagle eye was upon her. "What THINGS, other than Mrs. Peake's death, have happened here?" he demanded authoritatively. That was her opportunity and she took full advantage of it. Her words poured out in a stream of bitter maliciousness. She didn't like me. I had thought that before. She proved her enmity now by the way she tried her best to involve me in the Hill House mystery. Twice Barry tried to stop her malignant outpouring, but each time she threw off his restraining hand ind continued. I watched her closely while my nind worked swiftly. I realized that to a person hearing the story for the first time I stood in a. most unenviable position. Mrs. Ruther! ford's poisoning and the ransacking of Josie's room could be laid at my door and I saw no possible way by which I could clear myself from ,the charges. But of the other two events, the prowler and Mrs. Peake's death* 4 could never be accused. At the time of the first I was in Albany; that could easily be proved. And when that awful scream split the foggy fcvir I stood with Josie, Rhoda and Duncan on the terrace. With three such corro- boraters, I need not fear for mv- self. When Coral finished her story, I leaned forward to speak, but again I was forestalled. This~time it was Josie. Ignoring Captain Lancy, she criecf sharply: "How do you know these things?" Coral seemed to shrink at Josie's question* She threw a glance at Lancy as thtugh expecting him to interfere. He did, but not, I am sure, the way she desired. "Answer Miss Peake's question," he ordered sharply. "I was at the table when Mrs. Rutherford told about the prowler," she began, "and—" She hesitated so long that Dr. Paul spoke briskly: "I told her about mother." "Even though you asked us to keep Josie. a secret?" flung back "Neal told Duncan and Rhoda. Why shouldn't I tell Miss Easton?" he asked curtly. Josie shrugged her shoulders. "I suppose you should if you wished to do so. But that doesn't explain how she knew about my room. Did you tell her that as well and, if so, how did you know about it?" "I didn't know about it until just now, so I couldn't tell her." Dr. Paul's voice held an irritable note. His attitude plainly said that he resented being questioned or criticized. Josie paid him no further attention. Her eyes glared at Coral as she hissed through half closed lips: "So you WERE the one who ransacked my room. I thought so at the time. Don't deny it. I know you did it. Just what did you expect to find there of interest to you?" Coral's comeback was just what one would have expected from her. She sprang to her feet dramatically. "How dare you accuse me of a thing like that?" she stormed. She flung her arms wide as though calling on the world to testify to her innocence. "Why would I ransack your room? Do you think you are of that much interest to me?" Josie's reply was a master stroke. "Then how did you know about it?" The flat question required a like answer, and Coral, with heightened color, gave it. "I heard you and Sally Gordon talking about it in your room this afternoon." "What right had you snooping around, listening to what was being said behind a closed door?" I wished we might have heard Coral's answer to that, but Lancy intervened. He ignored the passages between Josie and Coral, returning to the story he had just heard. "Why haven't these things been told to us?" His voice was stern as he scanned each face. As no one replied, he asked still more insistently: "Why didn't you report the attempted poisoning to the police at once?" Dr. Paul explained his reasons for wishing to keep the matter quiet on the grounds of his mother's health; then added: "I also thought that if anyone were trying to bump me off, the easiest way to catch them was to lie low and say nothing. Mother's prowler tied in with the whiskey poisoning so neatly, I am sure the two are connected. I didn't know anything about Josie's room so couldn't report it If I had wanted to." "Hu-um!" Lancy's shapely fingers caressed his chin. "I agree that In some cases your plan would have been a good one," he told Dr. PauL "But, if you had reported it, con- Car- you might have savefl—* He stopped, but we all knew what he meant as well as if be had finished his statement. Dr. Paul agreed regretfully. "I know. I shall never forgive myself for not doing so. But, at the time, I thought I was doing the wisest thing." His greenish-gray eyes looked sadly across at Neal. "Now, Miss Gordon," Lancy again addressed me. "You haven't answered my question. What were you doing ten miles the other side of Winnetaumet?" "I lost my—" Before I could finish my sentence I was stopped by the sound of a hastily suppressed snicker from Rhoda. Duncan's amused voice spoke promptly in my behalf. "Captain Lancy," he said, "please don't misunderstand Miss Dutton's ill-timed laugher. It really is funny, although this is not the time for jokes. Miss Gordon can't drive an automobile five miles on a straight road without getting lost. We, Misa Dutton and I, carefully marked her route on her road map before wa _ -, ,, * J.v.^wi.nii v i* V4tv* uv XJVfrk^ii tillU OUUWU1 *," left Albany, yet we were SO JUM ed by Taylor that the personnel of that sho would get lost that when °"-" f " «'-""-- «- •—•-- -~ .__ she told of her trip at the table last night without mentioning losing her way, we were both surprised." He turned to me. "Why didn't you tell us you got lost?" "Because I'm sick and tired of being kidded about it," I snapped. "After all, it's my car and I'm doing the driving. If I want to get lost, it's my business." And believe it or not, every one, even "Cora Easton laughed. | Lancy's voice was much gentler i as he asked: "What time did you leave Albany Miss Gordon?" "Six-thirty." "Have you any witnesses to that?" "I have. The garageman delivered my car to my house that morning. Also the janitor carried down my bags. You can ask them." I was still mad, and I didn't care who knew it. "Have you ever been here before?" Lancy asked next. "No," I answered, with Just the plain negative. I had never minded being teased or laughed at before tonight. But suddenly the old joke had turned sour. "How did you happen to come here this year?" "Because I was fool enough to let Rhoda and Duncan persuade me into it," I yapped. "If I'd gone to Shinn Pond camp as I have for years, I couldn't be suspected of poisoning and murder and what not!" There was a brief silence. Then Respectfully yours, WILLIAM BACON, JOHN W. SCHMOCK, DAVID FALCONER, Committee on Sheriffs Claims. Moved by Jerome and supported by Ward that this Board request County welfare Commission to adopt the policy that one or more of their members can nnd shall do any part time work of executive or investigating nature best necessary for the working of a Welfare Plan. Carried. Moved by Schwass and supported by Hubbell that Chair appoint a committee to bring In a salary recommendation for Welfare Commission. Schwass, Schoenherr, Bertram, token and Jerome appointed by Chair. Moved by Schwass and supported by Hubbell that report of committee on Salaries of County Welfare Commission and employees be accepted. 20 i\yes. Carried. We, your Special Committee, beg to report :\ Administrator $125.00 per month. Of- i flee Clerk $80.00 per month, Office Stenographer $75.00 per month. Mileage fixed at 4 cents per mile. The three members for balance of 1939—$150.00 plus Mileage for balance of 1939 only. MARTIN SCHWASS, FRED SCHOENHERR, H. C. BERTRAM, FRANK JEROME, H. O. LOKEN. v Hubtaell and Bacon appointed Tellers by Chair. Madison received 18 votes. Campbell 1 vote for 3 year term as member of Welfare Commission; Campbell received 17 votes and Blegalle received 3 votes for 2 year term as member of Welfare Commissioner. Moved by Schwass and supported by Wltte that Gus Von Qlahn be recommended to State Welfare Commission as 3rd member of County Welfare Commission. Carried. Moved by Schreck and supported by Bacon that Welfare Committee of this Board meet with and assist the County Welfare Commission In every way pos- < sible. Carried. Recommended by Loken and support- d by Taylor that the perse County Welfare Commission be tinned same as at present time. ried. Moved by Jerome and supported by Schreck that Board appropriate $300.00 for advertising Mason County by Mason County Tourist and Resort association. Moved by Schwass and supported by Taylor that an appropriation for Bee i Inspection be made. | Moved by Loken and supported by Klemm that report of Finance Committee In regards to payment to Michigan Children's Aid be a'ccepted. Moved by Falconer and supported by Taylor to adjourn until 9:30 A. M. Carried. October 12, 1939 I Morning Session Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, all present. Minutes of previous session read and approved. Moved by Jerome and supported by Schoenherr that this Board appropriate to Mason County Hospital Association providing the Hospital Association will s!gn a 99-year lease of use of Detention rooms for Juvenile and Insanes for any County or City Unit without any further expense and providing specification of these quarters are satisfactory to Board of Supervisors and that It make a payment of $1,500.00 as authorized by this Board to be paid In January 1940 i and will pay additional $3,500.00 when ' Detention rooms are completed. Moved by Schwass and supported by Schoenhtrr that report of committee on ' Roads and Bridges be accepted. Carried. To the Board of Supervisors: We. your Road and Bridge Committee recommend that the division of road funds under the Horton Act be according to law and no divisions should be made In the last half. MARTIN SCHWASS, IRA GRANGER. GROVE O. TAYLOR. Moved by Jerome and supported by ; Hubbell that resolution regarding pay| ment to Louis LeSarge be accepted. i Carried. i Moved by Jerome and supported by Thompson that report of Welfare Com- Custer \... .0581 Eden .0283 Freesoll 0305 Grant 0216 Hamlln 0348 Logan 0112 Meade 0053 Pere Marquette 0455 Rlverton 0634 Sheridan 0182 Sherman .0509 Summit 0314 Victory 0459 Scottville 0526 ludlngton 4485 4,880.40 2,461.20 2,562.00 1,814.40 2,923.20 940.80 445.20 3,822.00 5,325.60 1,360.80 4,275.60 2,637.60 3,855.60 4,418.40 $37.674.00 $84,000.00 H. O. LOKEN. E. J. THOMPSON, F. JEROME. Moved by Schosnherr and supported by Schreck that the county waive all Rejected Taxes on property now owned by the Federal Government for National Forest purposes. 21 ayes. Carried. Moved by Jerome and supported by SchoenheiT that, Inasmuch as State Department has added to the duties of County Treasurer the work of preparing the lists of properties for sale for unpaid taxes but with the proviso that the expense will be paid by State, the Treasurer be allowed to keep account of the cost, present her bill to the State and retain the pay check and pay out of said check for any extra expense that Mason County Tourist & Resort Ass'n. Advertising 300.00 Bee Inspection 50 00 Masotr County Health Unit 1000.00 Dentist Assistant 180.00 Welfare Administrative 5 700 00 Welfare 7,200.00 County Infirmary 5,000.00 General Fund 8 995 00 H. O. LOKEN, FRANK JEROME, E. J. THOMPSON, Moved by Jerome and supported by Klemm thnt report of Welfare Commlt- Ut on appropriation to County Welfare Commission be accepted Carried. Moved by Schwass. and supported by Hubbell that Board appropriate $5,000.00 towards Bounding .of bridge across Pere Mnrquettc river south of Scottville. 20 ayes, 1 nay. Carried. Moved by Falconer and supported by Janousek that report of committee ou Rejected Taxes be accepted. Carried. October 13, 1939. To the Honorable Board of Supervisors, County of Mason, State of Michigan. We. your Committee on Rejected Taxes, submit the following report. We have compiled the amounts from the statement as returned to the County Treasurer by the Auditor General's Department and find State Tax. Interest or. State Tax, County Tax and County Road Tax to be charged back to the Township and Cities as follows: S « »3 OB >in UH e» 013 sa M a n M O V H O O 18 UBH uKH Amber Branch Custer 1.22 Freesoll 24 Grant 1.32 Hamlln 27 Meade 3.21 Pere Marquette 8.31 Rlvtrton Sheridan Sherman j 07 Summit 1.66 Ludtnton 221 Scottville $ 28 $.01 $ .01 .01 .05 .10 .13 4.24 4.77 10.07 .25 6.76 2.25 3.74 83.30 6.23 2.16 6.62 7.71 28.81 5.52 .19 1.96 .19 .90 .29 1.36 .30 3.09 .15 1.19 3 o 4.5.1 4.77 12.44 .79 9. -11 2.83 10.04 91. .'i7 6.1'3 2.16 7.74 32. :3 5.52 $17.79 $.31 $172.43 $2.34 $7.34 $200.21 crtaa <Vrtrv, v,,,.. „„„» «_j „ ~ Thompson tnat report or welfare uom- * rose from her seat and came ( n., tteep ,„ reg nrds to appropriations to over to me. "Sally, dear," she said I County Welfare commission be ac- gently, kneeling down by my side, j cepted. "no one suspects you of any of A shiver ran ; mend an appropriation of $475.00 Oct. 12, 1939 We, your Welfare Committee recom- - for those things." through her slender frame as she spoke. "You. are such a comfort and help, please don't be sorry you and'januaryTTs'ib" came?" I looked Into her brown eyes. | They were sad and serious, the | laughter quenched by sorrow and ' tragedy. But in them I read a depth j t a tlua!> r , of friendliness and loyalty which i q^'eue'rTve'r south'of'scottv'me. mas have been Incurred. Carried. Appropriation to Hospital Association brought up at this time. Moved by Lokun and supported by Schoenherr that an amendment be mode that the appropriations toward the Hospital Association be drawn from the Building Fund. 20 ayes. 1 nay. Carried. Original motion as amended. 21 ayes. Carried. Moved by Granger and supported by Taylor to adjourn until 1:30 P. M. Carried. Afternoon Session Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, all present. • Moved by Madison and supported by Falconer that report of special committee In regards to Crippled and Afflicted Children be accepted. Carried. We. your special committee on Crippled and Afflicted Children, recommend as follows: That sufficient money be appropriated to care for crippled and afflicted children when absolutely necessary, until the next session of the Board of Supervisors. And that the Supervisor of each township and name are designated fiom the City of Lud- lngton make the Investigation, and the Judge of Probate be authorized to conduct further investigation If he thinks same necessary. P. MADISON. FRED SCHOENHERR, DAVID FALCONER. Moved by Janousek and supported by Sohreck that report of General Claims Committee be accepted. Carried. Ludlngton. Michigan. October 9, 1939. To the Honorable Board of Supervisors of Mason County. Michigan. GmtUmen: We. your committee on General Claims beg to submit the following report. We have examined the Claims on presented herewith and respectfully recommend the payment of the some. No. Claimant administrative costs and $800.00 for direct relief assistance for each of the months of November and December. 1939 FRANK JEROME. E. .1. THOMPSON. JOHN W. SCHMOCK. October 12, 1939 Moved by Schwass and supported by myself. I put both arms around her and held her close. made me thoroughly ashamed Of ' Moved by Schoenherr and supported - - - by Jerome that report of Salary Committee be accepted. Carried. Moved by Jerome and supported by "I'm not sorry I came," I lied ! Hesslund that Fair Association deficit fool." I looked straight over her i "uoveA "by Falconer and supported bv head Into Lancy's steel gray eyea 'Peterson to adjourn until 1:30 P. M. and I thought I caught a flicker of i Carried. sympathy there. "Ask me anything you want to. I'll answer," I said recklessly. (To Be Continued) By LOGAN CLENDENING, M. D. ARE STRENGTH and physical fitness the determining factors in athletic efficiency f No. According to a London physician, physical fitness and athletic efficiency are by no means the same thing. A man may be physically fit and yet be a very poor athlete. Many itar athletes are discovered in the midst of their careers*to have tuberculosis— even extensive tuberculosis.,'The factors that make for athletic efficiency are difficult to define Dr. Clendening will answer questions of general interest only, and then only through his column. or detect, and simple tests are probably as satisfactory as more elaborate methods. The best methods? measure the response of the circulation to effort—pulse rate and blood pressure. But blood pressure tests are fallacious on account of the emotional factor. The rate at which the pulse slows after a short, intense uffort is the most reliable test. The superman athlete has a superiority pi only about four per cent over the t first class athlete, but that four per ;, i»nt does the trick. * •• * iAre some people more susceptible f in»«ct bites than others, just as an more susceptible to plant ttaett—poison ivy and hay fever? Undoubtedly. The reaction to in, pitas ia a form pf Immunity or ' affects people in differ- As in moat cases of im$be newcomer to a region l&e most severely. It It often by fishermen that the IP boatmen who live in the • bot affected by mosqui- nd do not pay any at- i, while the members f rty are Beaten up," '»ow tat fellow woo 1 limply poison me." ' o doctort have I'sagalflit flea ' ' '; ." ~"i larly S*H T^***. mp'f\« in fleas, t/hich do not encroach on the rights of the local population, but are the source of great misery to newcomers until they acquire an immunity. This usually takes several months to several years, and in rare instancesas never acquired." There is definite evidence that the fleas' selection of their victims is not a matter of chance. The flea knows who will be poisoned by his bite ! ! The flea antigen desensitizes against the reaction to flea bites. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS C. H.: "When one opens a can of condensed milk or vegetables, and leaves contents set in the can for a day or two, will it be apt to give the person eating it ptomaine poisoning?" ^ Answer: The danger of the open can is contamination with germs, not the metal of the can. Processed foods are more liable to contamination than others because in the processing they come to resemble bacterial culture media. Besides, processed foods -left in the can are more liable to be eaten without re- cooking, whereas raw foods havaJthe advantage of the germ-killing qualities of cooking. Of course, then, ptomaine poisoning can result from eating food left in an open can. W. T.: "What could have caused sudden dizziness after a strenuous set of tennis?" Answer: Probably the exertion and the heat caused a temporary redistribution of blood in the capillary reservoirs. The muscles needed more blood and deprived the brain, causing temporary anemia in the centers of equilibrium. They are very sensitive to such changes. EDITOR'S NOTE: Dr. CI«mdraIn« hu **n pamphlet* which CM b« obui nwden. Etch pamphlet lelli for 10 For any on* pamphlrt daind. tend 10 cmU In coin, and a Mlf-addmud ravtlop* •tampMl with a thr««-c«nt itamp. to Dr. . CUndoolng. in cart at thli Menus of the Day By MRS. ALEXANDER GEORGE (Associated Press Staff Writer) Meat Loaf Russell 1 pound chopped 1 teaspoon salt beef round 'A teaspoon >,' 2 pound chopped pepper pork butt ','4 teaspoon 1 cup soft crumbs celery salt !i cup chopped 1 teaspoon celery Worcestershire 2 tablespoons sauca chopped ','2 cup catsup • parsley 2 eggs, beaten Mix the ingredients until very smooth. Pack lightly into a greased loaf pan and bake one hour in a moderate oven. lemon extract >/2 cup flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 3 egg yolks 3 egg whites, beaten Date-Pineapple Torte l',2 cups vanilla chopped dates ','4 teaspoon 1 cup crushed pineapple 1 cup broken nuts 1 cup granulated sugar !i teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Lightly mix together all the ingredients. Pour into a shallow greased pan. Bake in a pan of hot water for 50 minutes in a moderately slow oven (325 degrees.) Serve warm or cold, cut into squares. Top with whipped cream. IN THE NEWS 20 YEARS AGO Official Proceedings Mason County Board of Supervisors Oct. 9, 1939 The regular session of the Board of Supervisors of Mason County commenced and held at the Courthouse In the City of Ludtngton on Monday, October 9, 1939. Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, Thompson absent. Board excused lor committee work. Klemm to adjourn until 1:30 P. M. Carried. Afternoon Session Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, Pell absent. Moved by Klemm and supported by Loktu that Peter Madison be seated in Supervisor Pell's place. Carried. ,, . . „ i Moved by Schwass and supported by Moved by Schreck and supported by I Jerome that division of weight and gas Taylor to adjourn until 1:30 P. M. Car- (money be made a special order for rled - „ ; Thursday at 9:30 A. M. Carried. , Afternoon Session Moved by Bertram and supported by Meeting called to order by Chairman Hubbell to adjourn until 9"30 A M Hasenbank. | carried Roll call, all present. Moved by Janousek and supported by Peterson that communication from State Association of Supervisors be laid on table until January session. Carried. Moved by Jerome and supported by Janousek that Resolution Committee prepare whatever resolutions they intend to Bend -to State Supervisors' Convention. Carried. Moved by Jerome and supported by Falconer that on Wednesday at 10:00 A. M, election of two members of Welfare Commission be discussed. Carried. Moved by Falconer and supported by Ward to adjourn until 9:30 Tuesday, October 10. Carried. October 10, 1939 Morning Session Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, all present. Minutes of previous session read and appioved. Report on County Agricultural Agent read by Peterson. Moved by Loken and supported by Hesslund that report be referred back to the Agricultural Committee. Carried. tlon and Oonatlpa GaJntog". '"Inftwt tot th« Treatment of Miss Alfield Burg and Miss Zulieme Cozine were honored at a party by the girls of the Fifth and Sixth grades of Pere Marquette school. 15 Years Ago Mrs. Peter Carlson was hostess to the standing committee of the Ladies' Aid of Emanuel Lutheran church. 10 Years Ago ' -Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Swansby October 11, 1939 Morning Session Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, all present. Minutes of previous session read and approved. Moved by Peterson and supported by Schoenherr that report of Agricultural Committee be adopted. 20 ayes. Carried. Moved by Jerome and supported by Thompson that appropriations for Salvation Army, Starr Commonwealth, Michigan Children's Aid and Mason County Tourist and Resort Association be referred to Finance Committee. Carried. Moved by Schoenherr and supported by Falconer that Board adopt a policy making Board for County Welfare Commission: 21 ayes. Carried. Ward nominated Wm. Tobey and Fred Campbell on a policy Board for County Welfare Commission. Falconer nominated John Blegalle, Hubbell, Perry Oamertsfelder; Jerome, Peter Madleon; Loken, Gus Von Glahn. Moved by Klemm and supported by : Afternoon Session Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, all present. Moved by Hubbell and supported by j Junousek that report of Poor Committee be accepted. 21 ay»s. Carrier!. I To the Honorable Board j of Sup3rvlsors: i We. your Committee on Poor, recom- ! mend that for the months of November and Dscember of 1939 the cost of operat- I Ing the Poor Farm be left with the Fl] nance Committee with power to act, and for 1940 we recommend the rum of $5,000.00 be appropriated to take earn of the Infirmary. Signed by your Committee: C. E. HUBBELL, H. O. LOKEN, LYLE L. WITTE. Moved by Ward and supported by Falconer that appropriation of $180.00 to Health Unit for Dental Assistant be made. 21 Ayes. Carried. To the Honorable Board of Supervisors: We. your committee on Health, beg to report as follows: That the request of $180 for the Dental Assistant be allowed. EDWARD WARD, P. MADISON, H. O. LOKEN. Moved by Schoenherr and supported by Jerome that report of Health Unit be laid on table until April session. 20 ayes. 1 nay. Carried. Moved by Schreck and supported by Hcf-slund that Township Tax report be accepted. Carried. Moved by Briggs and supported by Schwass that report of Justice Dockets Committee be accepted. Carried. Ludlngton, Michigan, October 11, 1939. To the Honorable Board of Supervisors of Mason County, Michigan, Gentlemen: We, your committee on Justice Dock- pts beg to submit the following report. We have examined the Claims as presented herewith end respectfully recommend the payment of the same. Board addressed by Mrs. Gilbert of Falconer to adjorfrn until 1:30 P. M. In Jut (nrtlo'n i-» r^V* 11^1 v/in'r- A 1*4 On^(n4->. * ft ...... n i the Michigan Children's Aid Society. Moved by Pell and supported by Hubbell that report be referred to Finance Committee and bring in recommendation. Carried. Mrs. Plttard addressed the Board regarding the Mason County Health Unit. Moved by Schwass and supported by Falconer that report be referred to Health Unit Committee and they to bring in a report. Carried. Moved by Jerome and supported by spent the week-end in Chicago. 5 Years Ago Mrs. J. C. Rhora and daughters, Rosemarie and Jane, returned to their home in Lud- 1. The Hackley hospital $ 2. Mrs. Gu» Lop- penthlen 3. Western Union 4. Doublcday Bros. & Co 5. Doubleday-Hunt- Dolan Co C. Panama Carbon Co 7 Dr. Holmes .... 8. Paulina Stearns Hospital 9. E. G. Ston.'X .. 10. H. Snifdberg & Son 11. H. C. Schrink <t Sons 12. Lakeside Printing Co 119.40 13. Acme Chemical Co 14. The Rlegel Press 1.x Qane Bros. & Lane, Inc 161 Gaylord Bros., Inc 17. George E. Dorrell 18. Dr. L. J. Goulft 19. Ludington Plumbing Co. .. 20. The Lawyers Co- Operative Pub. Co 21. Callaghan <k Co. 22. Dr. Farrier 23. Ackersvllle Hardware Co 24. Ihling Bros. Everard Co. .:.... 25. Reliable Plumb- Ing Co 20. American Legion Hospital Amt. Amt. Claimed Allowed Moved by Schoenherr and support! a by Schwass that appropriation ot $489.-19 for repairs at Fulrgound be made 17 ayes. 4 nays. Cnrrlod. Moved by Schoenherr and support U by Jerome that report of Fairgrounds and Airport Committee In regards to SflOO.OO advertising appropriation \><s accepted. 14 Ay t s, 7 Nays. Carried. Moved by Janousek and supported l>y Peterson that Mileage and Per Diem report be accepted. Carried. Days' At'd'ce Amt. Mis. Amt. Tot.il C. E. Hubbell 5 $25.00 13 $1 30 $26 30 H. Schreck 5 25.0030 3.60 28 tiO W. Bacon 5 25.0028 2.80 27 F.O O. Janou-ieic ....5 25.0030 3.00 2800 I Granger 5 25.0050 5.00 3003 E. Wnrd 5 25.0040 4.00 2900 F. Jerome 5 25.0014 1.40 20'10 O. Taylor 5 25.0060 0.00 3100 W. Hasenbank ...5 25.03 54 5.40 30-10 R. Hesflund 5 25.00 10 1.00 26.00 M. SchWR5« 5 25.0022 2.20 2720 F. Schoenherr ..5 25.0036 3.60 28.110 H. O. Loken 5 25.0045 450 29 .SO L. Witt,- 5 250018 1.60 2c!(,0 J. Peterson 5 25.0020 2.00 27.00 E. J. Thompson ..h 25.00 2 .20 25 HO H. Bertram 5 25.00 2 .20 2520 C. L. Pell 5 25.00 2 .20 25 :>0 J. Schmork 5 25.00 2 .20 25 :'0 H. C. Klemm 5 25.00 2 20 251! 1 ) U. Falconer 5 25.00 18 1.80 26 f!0 E. M. Briggs 5 25.00 18 1.80 26.80' Respectfully. OSCAR JANOUSEK E. M. BRIOGS. IRA GRANGER. Committee on General Claims. Moved by Jerome and supported l>y Madison tnat minutes of day's session be considered as read. Moved by Hubbell and supported by Falconer to adjourn subject to call of Chairman. Carried. WILLIAM HASENBANK .TR.. A. E. JOHNSON. Clerk. 20.00 $ 20.00 30.75 .99 104.19 212.04 16.55 1.00 5.00 49.99 13.70 5.13 12.50 20.58 16.08 6.45 75.00 17.00 12.57 7.50 3.00 123.00 31.95 3.06 23.25 2.290.57 30.75 .99 104.19 212.05 16.55 1.00 5.00 13.70 5.13 119.40 12.50 20.58 16.08 6.45 75.00 17.00 12.57 7.50 3.00 123.00 31.95 3.06 23.25 2,290.57 Freesoil Mr. and Mrs. Will Chopson and Mrs. Walter Davis were callers In Ludington Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Douglas Heckman and Miss Maxine Hunt were Thurs:day afternoon visitors of Mrs. 'Al Hilden. W. Walker of Brethren, who had been employed on the Frank Granger fa;-*i in Meade township, was taken suddenly 1111 and rushed to the hospital where he passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 25. Eli Isenbarger of Qunn lake and Lawrence Hill were Thursday evening, Oct. 26, callers at the Floyd Wolf home. 3.70 8.75 14.68 19.13 No. Claimant Amt. Amt. Claimed Allowed $ 3.75 89.60 113.08 1. M. W. Chlnnery ...% 3.75 2. Lester E. Blodgett 89.60 3. Henry Seeba 113.08 Respectfully yours, E. M. BRIGGS, H. C. KLEMM, LVLE L. WITTE, ; Committee on Justice Dockets. Moved by Schoenherr and supported by Schwass that report of Fairground „ and Airport Committee on $489.49 ap- ,, .. Arternoon session proprlatlon be accepted and that Chair Meeting called to order by Chairman B et time for discussion. Roll call, all present. Moved by Bacon and supported by Schwass that report of committee on Sheriff's Claims be adopted. Carried. Ludlngtou, Michigan, October 9, 1939. To the Honorable Board of Supervisors of Mason County, Michigan. Gentlemen: We, your committee on Sheriff's Claims beg to submit the following report. We have examined the Claims as presented herewith and respectfully recommend the payment of the same. No. Claimant Amt. Amt. Claimed Allowed 1. J. N. Taggart $2.35 $2.35- be accepted. Carried. 2, Q. D. Caplon 3.00 ington after spending the ?• American Laundry Co. «.« week-end In vlsltintr rplaiivps 4 Bverson-Ross Co., Ind. 5.06 i mt t Visiting relatives s Hume Grocer Co 4.08 m Flint. I a. Sinclair Refining Co. .. 1.40 Moved by Schoenherr and supported by Jerome that report of Fairground and Airport Committee In regards to $800.00 advertising appropriation be accepted and that Chair set time for discussion. Moved by Schoenherr and supported by Schreck to adjourn until 9:30 A. M. Carried. October 13, 1939 Meeting called to order by Chairman Hasenbank. Roll call, all present. Minutes of previous session read and approved. Moved by Schoenherr and supported by Hesslund that Finance Report regarding apportionment of County*Taxes 3.00 2.32 S.06 4.08 Amber 1.40 Branch Apportionment of County Taxes of 7 Mills on $12.000,000.00 equalized valuation making an $84,000.00 budget. .0403 .0145 $ 3,385.20 1,218.00 27. Office Supplies. Inc 3.70 28. Kse Lox Mfg. Co. 8.75 29. The Daniels Co. 14.68 30. Geo. H. Pfell, Inc 19.13 31. Hlllsdale School Supply Co 16.18 32. Geo. E. Dorrell.. 26.90 33. Lloyd A. Stephens 86.10 34. E. M. Brlges 57.00 35. Clarence H a r t- man 30.00 36. Mrs. Claude Love 9.00 Albert Powers .. 1.00 37. Raymond Beiry 8.50 Harry McCumbcr 2.30 38. P. B. Buckles .. 13.50 Lester E. Blodgett 3.15 3P. Edward Vanas .. 7.70 D. C. Spuller .. 2.25 Harry McCumber 2.15 40 Chas. Pitcher .. 15.00 John Manaleg 2.25 41. C. Ver Plonk ... 32.00 42. Milton Renwick 40.00 John Manales .. 2.25 43. C. J. Walker ... 11.20 Albert Powers.. 2.00 44. Farmers' Mutual Fire Ins. Co. .. 15.12 45. Dominic Yaslen 6 00 46. W. A. Somsr- f eldt 2.25 47. Peter Debro 17 50 4B, M, Barrett 2.50 Herman Klemm 5,00 Frank Jerome.. 12.80 Fred Schoenherr 8.60 Leonard Pell... 2.70 David Falconer 2.79 Grove Taylor .. 42.75 Ira Granger ... 21.00 Martin SCHWABS 10.00 Robt. H'aslund 2.50 Herman Klemm 2.50 Respectfully yours, OSCAR .JANOUSEK, E. M. BRIGGS, , IRA GRANGER. Moved by Loken and Hupported by Thompson that report of Finance Committee be accepted. Carried. We, your Finance Committee, recommend the adpptlon of the following budget and that .these amounts be raised as County taxes for the year, 1940. Salaries, Committees and per diem ; $29,000.00 Medical and hospitallzatlon .. 25,000.00 County Agent (Agr.) ..., 1,225.00 Starr Commonwealth Services 100.00 Michigan 'Children's Aid Society ,, cervices ( ' 150.00 Salvation Army Evangellne »Home Services ,..,,,.' . 100,00 PENTWATER THEATRE TONIGHT AND TUESDAY 15.12 6.00 2.25 17.50 2.50 5.00 12.80 8.60 2.70 2,70 42.75 21.00 16.00 2.50 2.50 'MtZNicic INTERNATIONAL. presents i LESLIE HOWARD INTERMEZZO A Love Story •IMTIOtUCIN* INGRID BERGMAN jrrodvc«d by DAVID O. SEIZNICK Dir*cl*4 by Gregory loioll Producer lull* Howard'; thru UNITED ARTISIJ,'' >»•»»•»' Nf*+< t <V » .4. ,'< y£w^4^i^/St^L • • t- - >,*w &\"- ' r iwi&&.m, >'

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