The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 22, 1931 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, April 22, 1931
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Page 3
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\VKDN KS VKDN KSDAV, APRIL _22, 1031 m,YTnEvn,i,E. (ARIUCOURIER NEWS PAGE Where Prajadhipok and Rambai Barni Will Visit News of tlio Blytlievillc Schools SiKlbury School The 3D gnuli! wttcoines Nnnnlf Mao Crnlu from Joncstoio nnj Ui- cinn Hood fioin Hnyll, Mo, The 3B grade is glad to have Ljr- llue While anil Alice Joe McFMl back wilii diem. They have been 111. The 311 grade has been Interested I" nature pictures and slorlus as a spring project. Many pictures of birds, flowers and trees have been brought to the room. Some pictures have been nmcle by the pupils, 'nicy are planning a hike soon. Donald linker brought a Bible story book for the rending tnble this week, nnd JeUle B. Allison contributed Mother Goose, rhymes These books have been read and enjoyed by a number of 3A girls nnd boys. Jack rosier had a pleasant trip to St. Louis Insl week. James HurreU Reese visited In Truiuiinn, Ark. recently. The pupils o( Die 4B and 4A rndes arc enjoying u continued tudy of blnls, as n part of their . _, - m I I V1IL JIU3 VUillVat. 1 nnguage work. They ore making con u m , c (llu 8otxl work . booklets an.l keeping up a bird cal- Irls K , cl)!m L , tack ln school ,, f 11 ar ' ' ter two weeks absence due lo scar- Tehe is the American castle of Treir Majesties, the King and Queen of Slam. The gray-stone, Norman structure, pictured below Is the country home of Mrs. WliHclaw It id, wealthy society woman who of!ered Ophir Hall and its large estate for the use of (he royal' visitors Above, at right and left, arc Kins Prajadhipok and Queen Ramlni liarni. Center is a view of the tc raced gardens which surround the houss on three sides. refitted into an operating room (or the removal of the cataract From the monarch's left eye. For several weeks afterward, he will convalesce on the estate, receiving almost no visitors. . Prajadhipok will have a chance frle.nd of General Chiang Kai-shek became president of Tsing Hua i 1928 and served well lor almost U years. The students iwintment was felt thnt his political, however, day to find n new toy In the room. It wns n set of dishes. In oriler to complete the equipment a small ta- jle was needed. The boys and girls o.sl no lime In writing a letter asking Mr Hratchcr to make them it table. IiConard Holt also brought a llltle tnblp. These toys furnish many Interesting activities for rending nml language work; for talks about food am! manners, for handwork nml piny. Playing "party" Is Hie mast papular s|x>rt ul present. The IA children enjoyed a picnic nl East Bid park Tuesday afternoon, 'lliey nre now making booklets uml stories about the things they snw In Ihe woods. The stories nre lllustmtcd with free hand drawings. Bobble Jenu Douglas' brother visited the 1A room lust Friday nf- lernoon. The children were nlso glad to have Deity Holmes, n former pupil, visit them. 'Hie 51) pupils have completed the "Wush Up" campaign, The children received their buttons us ft reward. Much good has been received from ilils contest. We hope ti Uyron Smith. Vernon Thompson, Edward Workman. Geneva Brown. Flol.-e IJlvthe. Edna Mac Brock. Klcnora Kauight, Virginia Henry, Helen f.nShot. Jane Nicholson. Al- \<-f Snllbn. Virginia Scott. Jewell Stewart, Alms) Tneker and Ruby \Ven ver. The hrallh of (be 5A tsrnile l"mrovinir. We liavc no one absent Hi'" «'ri>k on ncrouul nf Hh^ss. 1 The 5A grade Is plnnulivi In d!< n miniature Pniinnn C'inal to II lustrnte Ihe wonilorfnl locks, A np?ro minstrel was given by I'M 1 nlzed by the children of this group. While Hie girls In the first grade continue to sew on the uprons to be worn when feeding the "chickens" Ihe boys are busily engaged In making n garden lo raise some green food for the chickens, They have vegetables and flowers planted also. The dollar won by this room' at, the last P. T. A. meeting was spent for chicken wire with which to make a pen for "The Chickens." We are sorry lo have John Elliott Mlsho. Mildred Brahscom. and llel- let fever. The following 5B pupils have had n Stabbs absent beciuise ot Illness, perfect attendance for the past Cinule 1 was much pleased Mon- month: W. H. Davis, Jack Jenkins sliidciils of the smile CA at .. Sudburv M-hcol auditorium on Newest, H«st Remedy For Corns Stops Pain—Shoes Don't Hurt Any More SIX WAFERS FOR I0r GUARANTEED RESULTS ?rlclay afternoon. Admission of live c"n(s was charged those who •a«' tlv mom am. 'Hie iirocram n.sled mi hour nml wns very on- ."rtainlng. Robert Scott. Carl TJIV. Theodoie Payne, James Wood. orgi; gri-nr, and Howard Do/.lcr . wr-rc coinred men who starred In Thc n f wcsl - tes ' remedy for corns OnrdmiSiTincV^-^'mtcrioculo're. No b »™i»B nclds or bulky doujh- Miss Leone CatllcoU accompanied nilt I"™ lo adtl '>««'i"> llie sinners. Kleveii dollars was the sil °* s " rc 011 ' Press "~ (rial door t,?ccipl. Central Ward Thirty-two pupils of the Wafer" on the corn or callous wit 1 your finger. It sticks there. Slro:i as oxen, gentle as can us. The pa! stops at once. Slip shoes on ai; forget It. Later out comes cr>rn. oi first ' IOILS. roots and all. Guaranteed to grade. Mrs. linnhtci's room, at- never fall. Ask druggist for O-Joy Icndcd (In Art Exhibit. Friday Corn Wafers— six wafers tor 10c. morning. 25 pictures were recog- 1 Adv. 3 Barni Is his favorite golfing Chirks; Students Figlil Against Politics PEIPfNG. (UP) — Slufcnts at Tsing Hun College, founded with o , portion of the remitted portion of lmd wttllt « 1 Tsm S Hul '° b= kepi free of political Influence. Dr. Li left Tsing Hua when the northern militarists rebelled against Nun- king a year ago. to re.slst the nppDliHmciit of „ . . in- '"J"' P al 'ty. These will Include tin Ul'IOntal Monarch aim HlS queen's parents, the Siames3 Min- alde-de-camp. a private a treasurer of trie house- ill Will OCCUDV Huge Wliitelaw Roid "Castk" |ByNEA Service NEW YORK. (UP)—Ophir Hall. |square-ltiwered Norman casSl? of gray stone, dominating the hi:?) ?Vo(e,of Mrs. Whitelaw Rcli in '.ciiester County. ,N T . V., has Ibc'en pronounced fit for a kins. Art- lists, and decorators have wilh- secretary hold, and several members ol the Siamese legation. Dr - Seven out of every ten persons in London are I/indon-born. Lannlng Program Gets Home Agant's Attention The canning of greens and spinach, and making strawberry preserves are being stressed by MUs Idrawn, leaving the great halls air! JGora Lee Colcman among farm wa- Itapcflrlc.'l room; in perfect order, men of Mississippi county thr, |Phys!cians hav; inspecled a njwly- j month while both the agricultnra". and home dcmoustration agents arc I installed. white-tiled operating Irooni. Landscape architects a:ul g'ar- Ideners liave rt-tteaf/jd from Ihe Ibroad,: flowered terraces wr.lch Fur- 1 round the house on three sides. iGuards have been selected sn'l as- emphasizing the fighting of garden insects. Meetings scheduled for the. remainder of the week are: ThiirS' day. Stillman for the 4-H and Wo- Isigned to Iheir posts sr.rra::n:U]rs .man's club and L'cowah for tlie 4-H i (the estate. Frock-coated visitors club; Friday, the Woman's club o' Ifrom Washington have lip-toed LBlylheville. Today the Hatcher and lover the whole scsne, noditing at]- j West Ridge Boys and Girls clubs | |provai during their inspections. I are meeting. Four-H clubs at Leach- • For this is the American castle I ville and Carmi met yesterday Ioi King Prajadhipok. ruler of | while in the afternoon the \vomen | ISiam, King of the North and of Ithe South, Descendant of Buddha. I Supreme-Arbiter of the ilbb an-] Iplow of lire Tide, Brother of th? • Moon, Half Brother of the Sun, [possessor of the Four and Twenty (Umbrellas. : Will Seek Seclusion Of course he will be here ir.- Icognito. as a mere prince, an;l hz c I ordered legation officials to avoid I all possible pomp and ceremony I during liU stay in the United States. iBub everybody knot's that his ori- lental "majesty is still a king—the lonly absolute monarch left in the I world. "And it will be ns a king Ithat Prajadhipok will rule at Ophir Siamese representatives in Amsr- lica who were charged with the se- llecticn of a home for the King ani |Queeii and their party, were oflcr- yf. a number of estates. They quick\- rho.'e, however, that of the weal- Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, who often Inns used it for formal entertaining Ion a large 'scale. It not only h U".e "-jlargest of the country houses within Ijjeasy motoring distance of New York |bnt has particularly interesting so- |cial Irailitions behind it. More than a half century ago the [house was known as the horn? of lone Ben Hollidny, who Is said lo llm-fe had wild western ideas about lltfe In Wr-stchester county. He 1 bought up hundreds of acres of lland, which still belong to the cs- I tale., and stocked them with bul- Ifalo and deer. In the gay nineties. Ihe place al- Ircady tad begun to take its plice in social geography. In 10M the I house ,was extensively remodeled, land the grounds landscaped. To- liby the estale is noted for Its gar- Idens. which are r.aid to represent Ian almost inralimable forlun; in |rarc plants. Mrs. Reid began 20 years ago to Icocltcct terrestrial orchids (colen- Ithe hybridal. She now Is said n lhave nearly 5000 varieiles under Icultlvatton. and all of them rnrj. From the hotua, gently sloping llawns and gardens lead down to • less fi^nial gardens of shrubbary iThese give way to dense growths of trees which keep th? outside world from view. King Prajadhi- pok and Queen liambat Barni need have no fear of prying eyes, wherever they may choose to wander on the estate. The interior of Ophir Hall is In the most opulent nnd for- Georgian style. Many rare and y tapestries comprise Its chief work—a stiffly occidental set- Hug for the visitors from Sinm. May I'iay Golf One of the bathrooms has bsen of Carmi were in session. Miss Coleman gave a demonstration in canning mustard greens and spinach (o the Promised Land Home Demonstration club Monday afternoon at the home of Mrs. C. P. Tucker. FORD RELIABILITY THE FOX!> TUDOR SEDAN Sandy Ridge Mr. ami Mrs. W. F. Oncal. Miss Mabel Gcvinn and Mr. Parker of ', McFerrln wore visitors here last i week. Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Davis of. Bly- theviile visited Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Whittle Thursday. | . Mies Vara Vinim* visited Miss Ei!th Oakley, Wednesday after- ! nl on. [ Miss Allene Voss vsitcd friends at D-gwood Hidse Wednesday night, i Miss Gertrude Vcss and Miss Iris ' Oneal spent last week end with. Mr. and Mrs. W. F. On;al at Me- I Ferrin. J ML-s EioyY; Whittle entertained several young people at her home SUurday evening. Mrs. Phlleon Eubanks was the St'est of Mrs. Biawlcy. Sunday af- te neon. Miss Fay Baker sp?nt last week rrd \vit'.i her sister. Mrs. Buford Mn-tin of Blythevllle. Miss Hazel Everhart is spending tl.is week with lier aunt, Mrs. Ira Everhnrt al Blythevite. EARTHQUAKE CENTER OF V. S. NEW MADRID. Sio., (OP)—More ; earthquakes occur in this section of Missouri than in any other part | of the United States, records rc-1 veal. An average of 15 to 20 tremors are felt each year. CHANGE OF LIFE ''I used Cardul about sixteen years ago. r.ml found It helpful," snys Mrs. Tluth Scott, of Tn-,- riimbla. Ala. "I nlso uscil It during change of life. I was very nvrvoKs ami my Mck was \vi\ik. ] ili.l not Blucii wc!l !>( night, nnd wan rosttcFS and very worn-out In ilnytlmn. J look Car- dilt al thin time. It built mo up anil from Ihcn I (lave been well and strong." CARDUI Helps Women to Health Long 9 hard use slnnrs the value 01 good materials and simplicity of design EVERYWHERE you go you hear reports of the good performance nnd reliability of the Ford. Oneowner writes—"TheFordTuilorSedanlam driving has covered 59,300 miles through oil kinds of weather. It is still giving perfect satisfaction." Another owner descrihcs a trip of 3217 miles in 95 hours over bad roads and through heavy rain and sleet in the mountains. "Throughout the entire trip," he writes, "the Ford performed excellently and no mechanical (rouble of any kind vas experienced. The ehattcr-proof glass undoubtedly saved us from serious injury when a prairie chicken struck the windshield while we were traveling at 65 miles an hour." Sec the nearest dealer and have him give you a demonstration ride in the Ford. Then, from your own personal experience, you will know that it brings you everything you want or need in a motor car at an unusually low price. LOW F O U D P U I € E S *43O to *630 (T. o. b, Detroit, ,,Jui freight ani ifeiirrrr- Rnmprrt ant rparc tire extra nl low co«t. Ton con bur " Ford for a imatl JoKn payment, on economical monthly Irrmi,through lh» Authoring Ford Finance Plant of the Vnitetul Cfcail Company,) hoofs of grazing cattle Southwesr HE pioneer cittltmin who crowded the heels bf savagery was of the breed which met emergency with resourcefulness, his • word and honor needing no sureties. lii the face of adversity he wrapped himself in his abounding fortitude and calmly awaited the opportunity to again forge ahead. Like the mesquitc tree, he rvas the first to occupy the vacant space and, like the metquite in a drouth, which dies back from the top but whose roots arc deep in the soil, auspicious showers found him ready to again thrust out green boughs and luxuriant foliage. But t new wealth was destined to turn Che resourcefulness and energy of the pioneer cattle- man and farmer into more lucrative channels. In 1894 traces of crude petroleum showed in a well that was intended to bring water to the City of Corsicana, Texas. Exercising an inherent pioneer progressivencss, a group of far-sighted citizens began drilling for oil. Their visi /and foresight were rewarded when, In 1896, a producing well was brought in, marking the beginning of the first important oil field in the Southwest. Within a few brief months a movement was itarted co build a refiner)'. On Christmas Day, 1898, the first still in the Southwest was charged at Corsicana by the J. S. Cullinan Company, which, through a series of developments, bccamt the Magnolia Petroleum Company in 1911. Before the accidental discovery of oil at Cor- •icana in 1894, the vision of a Jules Verne could hardly have conjured a picture of the Southwest thirty-seven years hence. Oil, like black magic, plus the same kind of resourcefulness and forti- tude possessed by the early Southwestern pioneer, has brought untold wealth and prosperity to 2 land that would otherwise have been cattle pas- tures or cotton fields. As oil transformed the cattle range into cities and oil fields of beehive activity, the founders of the Magnolia Petroleum Company kept pace with each new need for petroleum products. As the kerosene lamp replaced the ancient and troublesome tallow candle, bringing new con- venience and pleasure to the ranchman and firmer, so was a new era of smokeless, ci.idcrlcsi luxury introduced to the traveler when, in the early part of 1901, the first oil-burning loco- motive left Corsicana over the Houston 8c Texas Central, burning Magnolia fuel oil. The Magnolia Petroleum Company, as the original refining company of the Southwest, like its pioneer predecessors, has grown with its responsibilities and opportunities until today we see the pioneer, who a generation back read his letters from home by the light of Magnolia kerosene, hurtling across his range in an eight- cylinder motor car, still served by Magnolia .. . his need's supplied bctcr than ever before by * Socony Motor Oil and Magnolia Hthyl or Max- imum-Mileage Gasoline. Thti it tlit I«t of * wr>« of biuocicil iketchei portraying (lie pioneer hiuccy of the Southwest, id eoinmrmar*- tioti of Founders' Montn of the Mignolii P«ro!*um Com- panf, riionctr Souibveilera MAGNOLIA Magnolia Gasoline and Socony Motor Oii for economical carc-fac motoring MAGNOLIA ETHYL GASOLINE "Hills are just scen.'ry" MAXIMUM-MILEAGE GASOLINE "More Milts per Gallon" 30CONY MOTOR OIL "No Motor can break it" FMJ-B PETROLEUM COMPANY Tioneer Refiners of the South weft §ii4 P*al*ri in Texas* Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana and New. Mexico

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