The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota on December 20, 1958 · Page 15
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The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota · Page 15

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Austin, Minnesota
Issue Date:
Saturday, December 20, 1958
Page:
Page 15
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CiNSOES -MAM.*!* DID CARVING TAKING AIM — Asked to pose with a snowball as she arrived at train station fof short visit in her home town of Raleigh/ N. C, actress Ava Gardner replied that she would be happy to toss the snowball if she could throw it at "the press." Here, s!.e takes aim on the pho*ogra- pher. (NEA Telephoto) Christmas Air to Dominate TV Schedule By CHARLES MERCER NEW YORK (AP)-Just about everything on the television networks in the coming week—with • lew exceptions—will be concerned with Christmas. For example: Thia evening — NBC - TV, Cimarron City present* a Western version of Charles Dickens' "Christmas Carol," starring George Montgomery, Audrey Totter, John Smith. Sunday — NBC-TV, Omnibus •tars Gene Kelly in his television debut with "Dancing—A Man's Game." CBS-TV, a half-hour program of Christmas music by the Salt Lake City Tabernacle Choir. NBC • TV, Shirley Temple's Storybook offers "Mother Goese," with Miss Temple, her three children, Elsa Lanchester. Billy Gil. bert and Carleton Carpenter. Monday night — NBC-TV, The Goodyear Theater offers "Curtain Call," starring Jackie Cooper in • half-hour drama about a child •tar trying to make a go as an •dult actor against the enmity of • critic. Tuesday night—ABC-TV, Naked City strikes an ironic note on the holiday with "And a Merry Christmas to the Force on Patrol." Wednesday night-CBS-TV, Pur. •uit presents "The Silent Night," • one-hour filmed drama starring Lew Ayres, Patricia Neal, Victor Jory. CBS-TV, Armstrong Circle The- srter abandons its usual format to offer live from New York dra- malic readings and narrations by Victor Jory and special Christ, mas music. Both CBS-TV and NBC-TV will present a variety of religious services and music in the late hours of Christmas Eve and ear. ly hours of Christmas morning. Thursday night—CBS-TV, Play- bouse 90 presents the celebrated Christmas ballet, "The Nutcracker" by Tchaikovsky. Danny Lewis Hot to Weigh Offers Jack Paar's Show (now view* •ble in the Austin Area) has proved a stepping-stone for many a .newcomer, and now its Danny Lewis, Jerry Lewie' dad. Danny's •hot a few songs for Paar has brought him both movie and TV •ffert. It'« just that easy! 5 New Telefilm Series Scheduled Five new telefilm series are on ft* MGM planning boards, and fee results should be interestng, Three will be based on old movies — "Scaramouche," "Boom Tt>wn," and "Johnny Eager." An outer space science - fiction hfea and a new western will be (M other two. Used Freely Before They Woodpecker Get Into TV HOLLYWOOD — ^Maybe ydu haven't heard about Woody Woodpecker and the big bad censors in the TV forest. Why, you'd think Woody was a regular) Brigitte Bardot or Marilyn Monroe. ^ Woody got censored, you see. Not for the reasons they censor Bardot and Monroe but they sure did take him to the cleaners be- fore he was deemed fit for TV. And what they laundered was film the kiddies and their parents had been seeing for years in movie theaters. Okay on movie screens, but not okay on home screens, the TV censors said. Twenty-five sequences, including tipsy horses, tobacco-spitting grasshoppers and neurotic birds, were censored from 52 of Woody's old cartoon shorts before they could make the TV rounds, according to Walter Lantz, creator of the charater. Lantz Runs Gauntlet Here's a close, up, from Lantz, of running the TV censor* ship gauntlet with Woody. "The first thing that happen. ed was the elimination in one swoop of all my films that con- talned Negro characters; there were eight suck pictures. But we never offended or degraded the Negro a*4 they were all top musical cartoons, too. , "The TV agency reasoning was that if there were a question at all on a scene, why leave it in? It might cause whom group or other to bring pressure, and if there's one thing the sponsor doesn't want, it's to make enemies. . DriaklBg Scenes Cat "The next thing we cut en masse were all drinking scenes. In one cartoon we showed a horse accidentally drinking cider out of a bucket and then, somewhat pixilated, trying to walk a tightrope. OB TV you see the tipsy hone Judy Garland and CBS Near Truce Judy Garland will desist in legal fireworks against CBS and vice versa. The result: A settlement will be made giving Judy a nice chunk of money for a TV version of her "Born in 4 Trunk" number from "A Star Is Born." on the tightrope, but since we cut out the scene showing his drinking the elder, the TV and. ience doesn't understand whe is Is groggy. "The agency censors also kept a sharp eye out for any material which could be construed as risque. The entire "Abu Ben Boogie" film was rejected on the grounds it showed a little harem girl wiggling her hips. Not Much Left Mental health and physical disabilities weren't overlooked, either. In "Knock Knock," Woody's activities eventually lead him to a nervous breakdown. When we got through cutting this one, what was left didn't make sense. "Our "Three Blind Mice,' the traditional nursery rhyme, became, for TV, 'Three Lazy Mice* and it was made clear that the trio of rodents is only pretending to be blind. Some Censorship Needed "However, looking back at the good old silent days of cartoon- making — and I look back 41 years — it was a rough era and cartoonists of that time deserved censorship. As an old-timer will remember, outhouse humor was extremely popular in animated films. "The reaKin for this strict TV censorship is that the continuity acceptance people are more critical of our work than of any other type of film. Naturally, we have a large children's audience; but those same kids, a few hours later, can see robberies, killings, blood and violence on any number of western shows. "I agree that there is considerable action and violence in the Woody Woodpecker TV series, but the difference is that nobody in the cartoons really gets hurt. A character may be run over by a steam roller but in the very next scene he's perfectly well and ready for more adventure. Use Common Sense "In editing my cartoons for TV I just tried to use common sense. Don't forget in television there are SO million continuity acceptance editors and you cant please everybody. "I was quite surprised when TV censorship was applied, how- CAN YOU WAIT?—Broadway's really only smash hit this season is "U Plyme de Ma Tante" with Colette Brosset and Robert Dhery (center) surrounded by some of their madcap associates. This will no doubt go on TV as a spectacular when the New York run is over, but that may not be until 1960. ever. I thought we were safe* Originally, all the cartoons had passed the motion picture censors and had received the Purity Seal. They had played in thea- ters all over the world with nftry a critical comment. Turning 'Three Blind Mice' into 'Three Lazy Mice' was especially shock* ing." AUSTIN (Minn.) HERALD, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1958-3 I Network Television 1 Monday, December 22 1C) Means Program is In Color 6:05 t.m. S~*Dovtd Stone 6:30 t.m. S. 10— Continental Classroom 7:00 *.m. 4-Jlegtried *, 10— Today 8:00 t.m t, 4 — Copt. Kangaroa 8:45 t.m. 3— News 4— Or, YoungdaM 9.OO t.m 3, 4— For Love or Money S, 10— Dough Re Ml 9:30 t.m. 3. 4— Play Hunch S, 10— Treasure Hunt 10:00 *.m. 3, 4. 8— Godfrey 5. 10— Price !• Right 6— Kll Hickok 10:50 t.m. I . 4. 8* -Taa Dalhw * ^» ^^ * —W WIIO. S, 10— Concentrotlon 6— Herald ot Truth 11-00 t.m. 3, 4. 8— Love at Ufa 3, 10— Tie Tot Dough t— Day in Court 11:30 t.m. 3, 4. 8— Search 5, 10- Could Ba Yoa «— »eter Hayes 11:45 a.m. 3. 4— Guidlna Light S— Caewtn ftvle 72-00 m lj 4L S. S. 10 Megs «Vee)thar S— Fil» Review 12:15 p.m. 10— Channel 10 Colling 12:20 p.m. 5— Treasure Chest 12:30 t>.m 3. 4— World Turns a Matters Day l.-OO p.m. 3, 4. S— Jhmnv Deaaj 1 w^S k <5 C * M *" I.-30 *.m>. >.•— Mausa Part* l-UnUetter Br^«^w». WB^tB^ff CtHV J.-40 />.«. 6— Matinee 2.00 £.«. 3, 4, 8— Big Payoff S, 10— Today Is Ours 6— Music Bingo 2:30 p.m. 3, 4, 8— Verdict Yours 5 10 — From T BeM Roots 6— How to Marry Millionaire 3.-00 p.m. 3, 4, 8— Brighter Day 5, 10 — Queen for Day 6— Beat Clock . 3:15 p.m. 3, 4. 8— Secret Storm 3:30 p.m. 3. 4, 8— Edge ot Night 5, 10— County Fair 6— Who Do You Trust 4:00 p.m 3— Show 4— Around Tow* S— Margie t — Am. Bandstand 8— Counterpoint 10— Whof» New 4:30 p.m. 4 — Commodore Cappy S— Last of Mohicans 8— Last of Mohicans 10 — Ten for Survival 3:00 t.m. 3— Club House 4 — Axel and Dog S— Robin Hood • *t «U 8— Organ TVme 10— Jungle Jin* 5:30 p.m. 3— Time for Talk 4— Popeye S— Hi-Five Time *— Mickey Mouse Club B — Adventure 10— Music Time 5:4> p.m. 3— News 10 — Looney Tunes 6.OO p.m. V 4, $. B. 10-News . Weather Sports •-Weather X.ff < j. _ o:/j p.m. i 0«> Goddara 10— NBC News 6:20 p.m. ./Hafts 9—SfeaaU Know 6:30 p.m. 3, 4, 8 — Name Tune S— Tic Tac Douah 6— Woody Woodpecker 10-Sherlock Holmes 7.-00 p.m. 3— Whirlybirai 4, 8 — The Texan 5, 10— Restless Gun 6— This Is Alice 7:30 p.m. 3, 4, 8— Father Knows Best 5. 10— Tales ot Wells Forgo 6— Male Choir Q ./iri .. m Ot I/I/ f/.T/f. 3, 4, 8 — Danny Tbomat 6— Voice ot Firestone S, 10— Pete Gun* 8:30 a.m. ». 4, S— Ann Sothern 5, 10— Goodyear Theater 6— Albert Lea Presbyter. Ian Choir 9:00 p.m. 3 — Highway Patrol 4 — Denlu Playhouse S, 10— Arthur Murray 6— Pofti Page 8— Ford Show 9:30 p.m. S— Sheriff ot Cochlea S— Highway Patrol 6— Target B— Groacha 10— African Patrol 70/00 p.m. 3. 4. t, 4, 8. 10— Neva Weatbei iaarts 1 rt. f < ""fc. 10:15 p.m, (—John Datv 10:20 p.m. B — Lawman /0:30 p.m. 3— Dr. Christian 4— Vanguard S— Big 10 toothe* •—Hour ot Stars ItV— Jack PAA*> (!»%.• 1 vf^^tjdt mor «i>9w 10 50 p.m. B— Sew Francisco Beat ' 1 -00 p.m. 3— Choir 4— PlayhMst S— Jack »aar She* B— San Francisco Beat 11:20 p.m. 8— Bengal Lancers J2.-00 m S— News presents three perfect gift sets for the man AUSTIN DRUG St. Paul at W. Water St. Hi 3-2105 Open Till 10 p.m. 7 NHw « Week

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