The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota on December 18, 1958 · Page 15
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Austin Daily Herald from Austin, Minnesota · Page 15

Publication:
Location:
Austin, Minnesota
Issue Date:
Thursday, December 18, 1958
Page:
Page 15
Start Free Trial
Cancel

FATHER IDENTIFIES VICTIM — A father desparately clings to the body of his daughter which he has just identified as one'of the Bogota, Colombia, department store fire victims. Hospital attend- ants and a friend attempt to pull the grieving father from the hospital floor where many of the 82 victims were taken. (AP Photofax) GOT AN ASPIRIN? Ike Wants Peace, Harmony Seems to Get Opposite Bf JAMES MARLOW elated Press News Analyst WASHINGTON (AP) *- Republicans are rubbing their aching heads. President Eisenhower probably is too. He's in the middle. What he seems to want is pea6e and harmony among Senate Republicans. He's getting the Opposite. A band of 10 rebellious Republican senators have teamed up to muscle aside the conservative Republicans who have been running their show. A fight looks certain Jan. 7, when Congress returns. The rebels may be outnumbered. In all, there will be 34 GOP senators in the next Congress. Sen. George Aiken of Vermont, 66 and no political chicken since he's been in the Senate 18 years, is leader of the rebels. They don't call themselves liberals. They indicate they think they fep-! resent the wave of. th« future, They point to the November elections — which took a heavy toll of Republican conservatives— as proof the voters are fed tip with conservative Republicanism. For years the Senate Republican leadership has been in the hands of conservatives like senators Robert Taft of Ohio, William Knowland of California and Styles Bridges of New Hampshire. When Taft died five years ago, Knowland succeeded him as Republican floor leader. Knowland was defeated this year when he quit the Senate to run for the governorship of California. But the 60-year-old Bridges, even more of a veteran than Aiken with 22 years in the Senate, is still very much a powerhouse. He's chairman of the Sen- ate Republican Policy Committee, Bridges and Knowland have differed a number of times with Eisenhower on foreign policy. But the rebels are not only trying to unseat Bridges as policy chair, man and put one of their own number in his place. They're also shooting at Sen. Everett Dirksen of Illinois. Dirksen, a Taft Republican and with a generally conservative record, wants to succeed Knowland as Republican floor leader, and he says he'll fight to get the Job. The Indians of western Guatemala speak 20 languages and more than 100 dialects. Maine is the only state in the Union which adjoins only one other state — New Hampshire. LIBERALS' CHOICE — Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel (R-Calif.), above, figures in the hottest GOP battle since the 1952 convention. He has been proposed as the next Senate minority leader by Republican liberals headed by Sen. George D. Aiken (Vt.). Conservative choice will probably be Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (III.). • i Legislators All Ask Where the Money Is Coming From Editors Note: This la the first of » scries, based on a mail surrey of legislators, on problems facing the Minnesota Legislature. By ADOLP1I JOH&SON Associated Press Staff Writer Where is the money coming from? That question, in one ( form or another, was placed at the top of the list of problems facing the 1959 Minnesota Legislature by every legislator who replied to an Associated Press questionnaire. Gov. Orville Freeman has announced he will present a budget calling for expenditure from the general revenue and income tax funds the next two years of 466 million dollars—about 67 million dollars more than was appropriat- ed for the current two-year period. Will Be Lower This does not completely lay out the problem for the Legislature since no estimates of revenue to be expected from present taxs have been made public. Arthur Naftalin, state commissioner of administration, has said that present estimates indicate that receipts from existing revenue will be lower in the next biennium than they have been in the current binnium." A good many legislators who replied to the questionnaire were unwilling at this time to offer suggestions as to how additional revenue should be raised. Favor Sales Tax Among those who did take a stand, 22 said they would favor IT" If. s a party —when you * I SCREAM C I CHRISTMAS TREES m a Dairy Products a sales tax in some form. That was the greatest number supporting any new revenue source. "It appears to me," said Rep. Clarence Langley of Red Wing, a veterans conservative member of the House," That a sales, tax is the only way out. A sales tax | should reduce or replace the personal property tax, however." Rep. Harold R. Anderson, North Mankato conservative, said "No one favors a sales, tax, but I believe .that a sales tax is preferable to the 50 per cent increase in income taxes or an increase of several hundred per cent in the state levy on property that would be 1 necessary to a long term solution of fiscal needs." One legislator proposed putting! the sales tax question to a vote at the 1960 general election. Income Tax Increase Seventeen legislators said they would be willing to vote an increase in income tax rates and a ( dozen said they would favor in[stalling the withholding system of| collecting income taxes as ai partial solution. ' | A complete overhauling of the I state tax structure along lines sug-j gested in the report of a study committee headed by J. Cameron Thomson and higher gasoline taxes also won support. Other proposals included increasing rates on all present taxes, higher iron ore taxes, legalizing horse racing, a moneys and credits tax, a chain store tax, higher cigaret taxes, higher taxes on non-essentials, a selective excise tax, taxes on those "best able to pay", and encouragement of new industry to broaden the tax base. THEOLOGIAN DIES CHICAGO (AP) —Dr. George [Livingstone Robinson, 95, theologian and archaeologist, died Wednesday. He was professor of Hebrew and Old Testament at Mc- wcormick Theological Seminary from 1898 to 1939. :<•»•< ttralntd \ tomato iuice ALL IN GAY NEW PINK LABELS Tomato Vegetable Apple AprUot Nectar Orange Apricot Pineapple Nectar Specially strained and homogenized to flow freely through nursing nipple Jake this coupon to \your grocer This coupon good for 1 con of any of LIBBY'S JUICES FOR BABIES (tomato, vtgitabU, or«ngi, ipplf. apricot mctar, apricot plnupplt uctv) when you buy 3 cans of any Ubby's Baby Foods or Juices OUU8S: Olv. «h» covpon le your libby >ol«mon o, mail mutt b> ihowii en ..qu.it. Cu.lom.r mufl pay any lalu lg> dl.«ily 10 M and ..(Umpikxi will b. mod* gl yew r.gulor Involv.d. K.d.mpl.cxi will i»l b. mod* in any <Uh«r way of r.taUpric. pl«2*p«'couponfoihai>dliiig,pfe>id«dy«>uand Ihrougk guy ouliid. oguicy. •«. Thi» o«*> void wk«r«*r eu.lomtr ho,. tompli.d wilh ih. l.rmi of IhU o».<. Uivoic., |g«.d « f.nrict.d. libby. McN.iU 4 libby, Chicago 4, IU. proiing pwehow of »u«icl«nutockloce»vcoupontuibmiiud Co»h Valu* l.'tOf. OHv «»pir*» March 31 1»" Inspectors 1unt Safe Crackers DULtfTH, Minn. (AP) — Postal aspectott and police today were rating safe crackers who drilled jpen the stroftgbo* at the Hunters ark post office branch early Wed- esday. The loot included $114-««ash, 187 money order blanks, 7 registered AUSTIN (Minn.) HERAID Thursday, Dee, 18, 19&I letters and a .45 cttlfew The thieves gftbift) ihtry tog * reap dobr. • tore- Woodchucfej gorge with todd before fcj|«rttitt11|, then live off their own hi until spring, JUST RECEIVED SHIPMENT FIRE PLACE SETS Fire Matches . " -• sr- $ Log Carriers | «nd up Lowest Prices Ever in Austin CLEVELAND'S ACE HARDWARE STORE HOURS-OPEN DAILY 9a.m. to 9 p. m. - SUNDAY 9a.m. to 1p.m. MM* MfNMv* nrMfk Wt* • M. 1*W 3 NATIONAL EXTRA 'GIFT-HOUSE' Stamps WITH EVERY TURKEY and This Coupon NORBE5T.QVEM READY Grade*A' NATIONAL'] 200 FREE "GIFT HOUSE" Stamps With Ivery TURKEY NrcfcM* - WkM ActMHiM h* Tkh CMM* kh •» All NATIONAL POOD STOUS feMpt TWIN CITIIS «Nl SUIUMS C«ipM bplrtt Wrtitttoy Nlta, DM. M, IfM NOTtCIi "nit C*«H« h b»*4 f*r y*ir «t M4 nckmtf* It IMfrnMl t»»4 S«*r*t Mly, «MI r*mlM MM property •* NitteMl TM C*. The ••If r)|M ¥•• «<•!(•• !• ftli trap** b to tnkmM If tor «Wt HMM itampt •»«!• MM y«« »«t* • pircIMM •» ywr N«tl«M< N«4 Stort. Ten mut »t <I»*M •! Hit *••»•• w ••* H ta MY «H»r w«y «Hb> ait Mr «MMtt ta wrHI«|." OM CMM* f»r PtrtM NATIONAL> NATIONAL COUPON FOOD STORES wi Risim TMI M*HT re LIMIT gtiAmmtt WHOLE-Grade"A"-Oven Ready CUT-UP PAN READY FRYERS.... Lb. 39c TOMS 22Lbs. and Over HAMS WHOLE HAM 65c Lb HORMEL DAIRY 12 to 16 Lb. Avg. SHANK HALF BUTT HALF 69c Lb. Lb. DUCKS MICHIftOLOIN CAPONETTES Ov.H'ttcdy : 4»o§ Lb. Lb. Av«. i-lb. 39' HORMEL MINN. hwitx .*,-*.*.*AGE.... PUSH ALL MEAT GROUND IEEF u . 49 C PUSH—IN CRT.O-VAC IA« LUTEFISK u. 39° COLD CROSS—IUIK MINCE HEAT J£; 29 e Boneless HAMS $^59 CkrlrtMi •BJI Wr«w*4 HORMEL •• | Boneless ^A r Fully Cooked i NN!P> PICNIC Hormel J Lb. NOIUST—OVIN UADT—TOM TURKEYS 39 GRADE "A" II to 22 Lb. U.AV*. Fully Cooked f Can $3.39 GARDEN FRESH CORN Wholt; Kernel or Cream Style. No. 303 Tin Each AppU, Cherry, P*ach BERRY HILL AMERICAN DELUXE INSTANT COFFEE NATIONAL'S 1+ec, Cinnamon Loaf IROWN 'N SIRV! 41* ^Bkj TWIN ROLLS ^'29 NATIONAL'S *"""' COOKIIS SANDWICH YOU! CHOICI Ml. PK0. Devils Fudge, GoldeH or Yellow CAKE "CINCH" MIXES NAYCO FLOUR Christmas Candy Old Tyme Mix 16-or. Pkgs. NIFTY-Frozen WAFFLES !• Your Toattor CAL-IDA-Froxen French Fries lOtel 00 GELATIN PiliUIT J E I. •_ - A A ? SORTW • mm m * %T FLAVORS 1Qp^89 c Sweet Potatoes 5 14V2-OX. $f .00 Cans I "OULANr* PILLSBURY'S SWEET MILK or BUTTERMILK BISCUITS 8-Oz. Pkg. \ f\ Oven Ready | \JC KRAFT.Philadelphia Cream Cheese; 2 3-ei. **4^C nv 4m W cn >m Walnuts "*«" m IHI «uu Roasted ~ «*^ P*anuf. E 33 e MIW cior i-U, due •ID POTATOIS 25 a 98'"~ .CHRISTMAS FBU1TS and VEGETABLES GUAEANTEED FBESH1 DELICIOUS APPLES ITATI V FANCY.GOLDEN YELLOW A All BAHAMASZ 55 HP m mmmmmmmmmr S9- - TANGIRINI9 notiOA nn tu+ i«y to r**J 29* -

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free