Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland on November 9, 1955 · Page 15
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Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland · Page 15

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Cumberland, Maryland
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Wednesday, November 9, 1955
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Page 15
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Dial PA-2-4600 for. :a WANT AD EVENirTfc TIMES, CUMBERLAND, MD., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1955 FIFTEEN Cryi ing Towel Getting Wide Use By Dole By The .Associated Press A Southern' Conference football coacli who doesn't like to shed tears over injuries got out the crying towel today. "We have never made it a policy to cry over injuries here," said Davidson Coach Bill Dole. "For; « i most part, they can't be ped. But the roof has fallen in on us now." Dole, getting Davidson ready for Saturday's scrap with Woff'ord, re-j ported four of his aces will be outj of action. They include ends Tom; Newton and Jim Patterson andj season f or the first time in its 2'8~-iyoung, swift and eager.' Local Church \Griffitli To Keep Dealing League Plans For Dressen-Type Players Two Divisions The Central YMCA By HERB ALTSCHULL WASHINGTON (/P)—Calvin Griffith, the Washing- Sunday! ton'Senators' new president; promised today to keep on Handling I Colt Shocking U. Kramer Lands \Milivaukee Will Make Offer < Rex Hartwig ITo Pacific Coast Directors Foi' NeW TOUI' i SAN FRANCISCO (#>)—Pacific Coast League direo ' ! | tors, who decided four years ago they wanted no further. ! LOS ANGELES t?> - Profession-; pa - rt of ma j or ] ea g ue baseball, get a chance tomorrow to? la! tehilis promoter Jack Kramer! . , . , . , Irlidn't <:n<vf.<vl in si^ninff nn twn! c '' la > 1 B e their millClS. I llSrafen net staSTut the iJl The Milwaukee Braves, one ofj*ague decided what it did not want^ 'Californian had one consolation to-jthe most prosperous clubs in bi S| wasfm ^ day — Aussie doubles standoutitime baseball, are ready to make£°^{ lu "°" • Rex Hartwig. Ian offer for the debt-riddled fran-l" i Kramer failed down under to! cnise in San Francisco. The move iland Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewallh™"^ take the league off the fi- jCor his winter tour. But he an- lnan( -' ial noak - but would require a ! nounced here vesterdav that Hart>»-™§e in the loop constitution. »h at that ^ j^ago The Braves need a top mmor LAUREL, Md. Ut backs Jim West and Don McRee.j yea r history, according to Clifton Griffith made his first move yesterday, a 4-for-5 player swap with kig. the Wimbledon doubles champ: Joseph F. Cairnes, executive; league farm property since they The forei«n ! for the past two vears, has turnedjvice president of the Braves, has^e out of business at Tokdo 0., ••• . - ." . - - 'ways of handlin- hoU afeVo and is securely in the Kramer^aid QatljMhat his organizadon isjjn tne Amencan Association They until he has Chuck Dresden's kind of ball club-j ^ ge °- ld ed .o^JSSs Sjcamp. (interested but that the Braves are, to accwitagu, Cannes the ^.,. none more unusual than that of! Hertwig. who slammed his wav^'""^ make an offer untiljtenUal in the San Francisco^ Panaslipper. the hope of Ireland jto last year's Wimbledon title with! 11 "* Imd out u , hat the Coast ; area in the International race Friday.!compatriot Hoad. will "get a flat ;Lea § ue wants of tnem - ; ' j The 3-year-old colt is being given!S30,000 for his United States ap-! That places the matter squarely; JQfJ-Yarcl " jhis final preparations by a 20-year-:pearances. Kramer said. The raw-Jin the hands of the PCL directors! iold — jockey Thomas M.Burns —;boned Aussie also gets a percent-iwho meet tomorrow at Vancouver! (Continued from Page 14) XIcRee- may play in the finalejVan Roby, "league"Secretary" terd'ay."7'4-Tor-5"piaye'r swap" with * Nov. 19. Dole said, but the others" Robv id that ^ f th t the Boston Red Sox. Right now jfni- e r:* v T eaf l wUl be lost for the rest of the sea-| divisi j n _ , eague were m -, e gt a |he's in the midst of negotiations * 11 *^ ^ ll } A^d" -"• Mountaineers DriU ^re^ilf ^e^lS teams In^he'New York Yankee* " ' a " S ^ The Blue Bonnets kee P ri S nt on ,and a iV-year-old - Brian Enrightjage of gate receipts during a for-'for the express purpose of deciding| Linjl for a M . yard passing gaiB to West Virginia's unbeaten and un-|, , Division and 14 in the! Nobody on the Washington clubl rollin g in the Ladies ci 'y Bowling la groom. .ieign tour in July. .'the fate of the San Francisco fran-j the Bruin 35 But since the whistle " tied Mountaineers,, the nation'si,, „ , Dj ,- „...., . (was willing to talk about what pos-! League, shutting out Chicken Roost! They have been the sole hands j Kramer said he plans to have chise. jhad caused the Bruin defenders sixth-rated team, drilled early:andj hv nn nno ^ nrr ^-, ^ the American'sible trades may be cooking, buti'tc stretch their lead over p yl - 0 [ax iattenciin g the Irish Derb - v vinnerjHartwig meet Pancho Segura of.= B iils Total $200.000 |to slow down, the -eferee nullified .-..,. , heCl ° late for Saturday's imp'ortant tie. at Pittsburgh. Guard ; Charles j Hbwley, who suffered a leg injurj'i . ^ last week against George Wash . top seven teams m ^each ingtoh; will start at his usual post. Winless Virginia Military's halfback Buzz Snyder remained in the hospital recovering from bruises received last week and. may not "play in.. Saturday's .conference game at The Citadel. The Citadel, which staged a lengthy scrimmage yesterday, hopes to improve on its finest win. ning season in 13 years. The Bulldogs have won five'and lost two. Pass defense and scrimmage occupied Richmond's Spiders, who continued work for Saturday's . league game with George Washington. •' Tech Faces NCS Furman will" start a revised backfield lineup Friday night against Florida State. Jim Boyle will start at quarterback, Jerry Penland and Johnny Popson at the halfbacks and Jim Grant at full-i back. Virginia Tech,-which faces'North Carolina State Saturday at Blue- (Continu'ed on Page 16) . since the Irish arrival a •SKATING Every Tries., Thurs., Sat., Sun. Evenings 7:45 'till 10:45 Derby winnerjHartwig meet Pancho Segura o{,i lit was considered liKeiy mat mej fn _ iv CTJ)mp! . PvrnfaY rt rnnnpf i ^"'^ "" m " val a xveek a §° foriEcuador in singles matches while! Tne franchise is on its last fi-jthe pass and it went for a three-.' ! two key players being offered byL ' f . ' „ .., Qloppeu d jthe 865,000 race. Trainer Paddy! Kramer tangles witli Tony Trabert., nancial i egs . Bills total in the i yard sain for Perry—who didn't- I Washington are infielder Pete Run- [ M decision to Capital. jPrendergast isn't due until today, j the American champion who re-; neighborhood of S200.000 'and! have the ball. ^ ' Mickey-McDer-i ^ n other matches Owls N'est top-j Americans would no more think jcently gave up the amateur ranks 'there's no money in the bank toi ••• • • •-• [Washington nels and pitcher w'll be consolidated for first flight \ mo ^ play wliile the bottom^ever, teams}- Dressen, who took over as Wash: ington's manager last season, likes a teani that, can field well, bang iped Racey & Lynn, 2-1: Southern;ol entrusting a high class raceiior Kramer gold. , them L- the National-and the eight low| ; teams in the American will participate in second flight play. The eight top teams in the first flight will qualify for the playoffs. The teams w'th the highest percentage in the first flight will receive the Loyal Order of Moose Trophy while the winner of - the playoffs will be presented the Lynn C.-Lashley Trophy.. The four top quints in the second flicht will engage in the playoffs with a .trophy going to the winner. - • The schedule: -AMERICAN DIVISION . .. (At.Ontrml YMCA) 12:00—Tark Plac<? Methodist vs. La Vale Methodist. 12:55—LaVale Baptist vs. Holy Cross Episcopal. 1:50—Living Stone-vs. Central Metho- „ Every Sat., Sun. Afternoon 1:15 until 4:15 sell only Hie very best in .shoe ,kates. Shoe; skates for, the small fry ot .9.95. Special for two .weeks only our regular 14.95 CHICAGO'S 13.95. We carry a' cornplefe line of shoe skates and all sizes. Order now for Xmas. All shoe skates guaranteed three months. Rink, phone PA .2-9709. "IT'S GREAT TO SKATE" ARMORY dist. 2:45—St. Luke's Lutheran vs. Grace Baptist. 3:40—First Methodist vs. Maccabees. 4:35—Kingsley Methodist vs. St. John's Lutheran. 5:30—Pentecostal vs. Melvin Methodist. Trinity Lutheran drew a bye. NATIONAL DIVISION: (At AllcifVnj Hijh School) 12:00—^United Brethren vs. rirst Baptist. 12:55—Centre Street Methodist vs. St. Mark's Reformed. 1:50—St. Philip's Episcopal vs. Emm anuerEpiscopal. 2:45—Grace Methodist vs. Calvary Methodist. 3:40—Cresaptown vs. First Christian. 4:35—Trinity Methodist vs. Emmanuel Methodist. 5:30—First Presbyterian vs. Centenary- Fred Wilcox," : who ran back 91 yards with against Ole an intercepted pass Miss last year, is assisting Tulane sophomore Gene Newton with the Green Wave quarterbacking this fall. USE OUR T O Y LAY AWAY PLAN The TOY SHOP Cor. N. Centre & Bedford Srt. out singles and run. He won't turn """%, T«_!ii n . rinwn * Inn* hall hitW 'hut: .h«'H! Edna Falr ' 166-411. • Owls;- Bar took' three b'v" forfeit. andi horse to such lack of attention .thanj Then Hartwig and Trabert will; 'fn mid-bctober Hank Greenoerg;! Sherman's^blanked "Queai Citv jhaving him sn-im the Atlanucjjoin forces against Kramer and; al mana g er of the Cleveland: anermans oianKea yueen wiv. iQcean. This year s 3-year-old star.iSegura m doubles matches. Stars of the week were Mai-yj.\r ashua had fivfe attendants and: down a long ball hitter, but he'd prefer .the other sort. Good Outfield The Senators figure, the acquisition of Karl Olson and Neil Chrisley from Boston could give them a potentially speedy, sharp - hitting ihis own mineral water from Ar- outfield, along with Carlos Paula, 0 n .• n Leighty, 139-372, R&L: Eileen | kansas for drinking when he came bnllel * °P en Fisher, 146—354, Southern; Eliza- jto Maryland from New York. ;Bbb Davie* Dee. beth Rhoe, 176—490, Capital; Loisj Burns will be riding Panaslipper. Wilson, Morton, Mary Roost: 128—379, Pyrofax; Elsielin the race against 12 other hand-| GETTYSBURG, Pa. — Playing! 162-423, Blue Bonnets: I picked horses for the first time, (under a new coach for the Moon, Pollv 161—350, JIcKay, Chicken ! 176-472, Pearls Add To Lead «""'««. «»«8»«» .^»» "IT'Sherinan's, and Esther Mason a: Cuban Negro .who impressed tlie _ Washington management last sea- ~ 363 - Q ueen Clt J'- Standings: -127' son. W Li Gem Ladies Leanue time in 2S years. Gettysburg Col-; 'Indians, volunteered to take the j franchise if the league would give: jit to him for nothing. He said -he: would put up enough money to; guarantee an operation next sea-j son and provide players from;s farm clubs while re-! as Indians' operating! ;| ieac j lege is scheduled for 22 basketball 1 . Braves Need y arm games during the^ 1955-56 cam-j. Djrectors fai i ed to give approval: ipaign. BobDavtes. former Roches-! wUhin 24 hours, however, and he' Pearls added a game to their;ter Royal and Seton Hall ace.;^thdrew' Thus, the club's big. problemilvrofaxT." 5 .: u .1 la^taT. Ba ": u i6i Gem Ladies Duckpin League leadlbegins his first..war as head coaclij Back in the winter o[ 1951 . 52 {he ; now is in. the infield. • )Racey t Lynn is 9 cwcken Roostn isjby stopping_ second-place Opals,iof the Bullets, filling the shoes of! THE MOTORISTS' FRIEND, Inc. 173 Baltimore Street BARGAINS FOR HUNTERS HUNTING COATS .... PANTS and BREECHES .. J •fi ,~ * • j t * -i -'Owls Nest ... 17 10 Queen City Dressen and his aides are en- Sherman . s ... 1413 x thusiastic about young Jose .Val- 8 18 2-1. Two oth'er matches were de-JHen Bream who resigned at .thei cided by shutouts. Sapphires de-lend of last season, his 28th. divielso, who -played well as a rookie shortstop last season. And they're satisfied with Roy Sievers at first and Eddie Yost at third: That leaves second base, a position filled capably last season by Runnels. But Pete is a bit - slow and has some difficulties making the double play pivot. The Senators, therefore, reportedly are eyeing the Yankees' Gil McDougald' and the Indians' Bobby .Avila. Avila, although none too sharp on the double play pivot either, is a good glove man and he can hit. 'He won the American League batting championship in 1954. McDougald is an excellent, all around player. The Yankees might be willing to swap. him for Runnels, a shortstop before moving to second. McDermott To Go Runnels hit .284 last season, McDougald .285 and Avila .272. McDermott is considered likely to go because he and Dressen reportedly don't get along very well. That was understood to be one of thp reasons why the Senators were willing to send pitchers Bob Porterfield and Johnny Schmitz to Boston as part of yesterday's deal. But if Washington gives up McDermott—-its leading hurler in 1955 with a. 10-10 record—it will have only two left - handed pitchers, Chuck Stobbs and Dean Stone. Thus, the Senators could be bidding, possibly for Cleveland's Don Mossi (4-3) or New York's Bob Wiesler (0-2). A Cleveland - Washington trade Clingerman's To Battle ?urple Heart Tonight )lub in the top.match scheduled onight 'in the Allegany County Vomen's Shuffloboard League. The runner-up Woodmen of the World will shoot it out with Cresap- own on the letter's board. Other matches on tonight's schedule are: Golden American Green's Chevrolet, Frostburg Eag- es at Cas Taylor's and Stadium nn at the Hi Dee Club. The . Eagles. Hi Dee Club and ..egion are deadlocked for' third. revolving around McDermott. Runnels, Mossi and Avila could be cooking, but the Senators' front office won't comment either wav. like no other whiskey Once you sip and savor the deep mellowness and friendly flavor of Calvert you'll know the meaning of true whiskey satisfaction. For Calvert has a smoothness going down that sets it apart from all other whiskies. For proof, try a Calvert "Lo-BalT today, and see why millions have switched to Calvert Co.;N.V.C-ILEKDF.&.WHWKKY-IS.I p«oor~i5*CRAI^ NEUTMI SPWITI feating Diamonds and Turquoise topping Rubies. : Team leaders were Lois Wilson, 170-452, Turquoise; Theresa Poisal, The. Bullets open their season at! home on Dec. l. entertaining thej Elizabethtown College Blue ,Jays.j They'll meet Temple University on; Clin^erman's leaeiip ] P adins 15 °- 412 ' Dia mond: Kay Leighty.jDec. 7 in a Philadelphia Palestra; earn Dla^ host to f urole Si 177 - 369 ' °P als: Maxine Valentine, doublehekder, with Vfflanbva tack- ! earn piajs nosi 10 rurpie Heau ,„„,.„ ,,,,, • „. !,„„„ -MV.I.-,,- m. ];„« ct t?^^.,,v ;„ *i,o «m Q ^ n ^™,. Nugget Legion, at Frostburg Pocahontas at 122-358. Rubies: Polly McKay.^Ul-jling St. Francis in, the other game.; ^ 356. Pearls, and Theresa. Mala-iNavy, Muhlenberg and Lafayette!'" chowski, 122-350, Sapphires. [also appear on Gettysburg's card.i QUPONP PROTECTS YOUR CAR FROM FREEZC-UFS, ACIDS, RUST AND CORROSION One of Our Reprvientativei Will Gladly Diicusi Thii Wonderful Plan With You ! fc\ore People Ar* Buying Our HOMEOWNERS POLICY- Because:— liki th* idio of buying In an* n«at poclcagi all th* mturanc* • hom«own*r n**ds ... 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