Panama City News-Herald from Panama City, Florida on June 25, 1974 · Page 1
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Panama City News-Herald from Panama City, Florida · Page 1

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Tuesday, June 25, 1974
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Good Morning! Today Is Tuesday, June 25,1974 "If you have kftfwtalfft ' let others tight their tmm at it." - Thomas English clergyman Kissinger Admits Secret Arms Deal WASHINGTON (UP I) After strenuously rejecting charges of a secret arms agreement with the Soviet Union Monday morning, Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger later in the day acknowledged the existence of a secret loophole in the pact, according to Congressional sources. In a three-hour Senate arms control, subcommittee meeting which members described as frequently acrimonious,- Kissinger said the loophole was wholly unintentional, that he had not known about it at first, and that it was finally closed only last week. Sen. Henry A. Jackson, D- Wash., reportedly accepted the explanation and said he had never Intended to Imply that Kissinger had made deliberate concessions to the Russians. "The Issue here Is not 70 CLASH — Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, left, chats with Sen. Henry Jackson, D-Wash., as Kissinger arrives to appear before a Senate Armed Services subcommittee in closed session Monday in Washington to brief the group on the ongoing U.S.-Soviet SALT talks. Earlier at a news conference, Kissinger denied charges by Sen. Jackson that Kissinger had a secret agreement on arms limitation with the Russians. (ByUPI) Leaking Oil Barge Halts River Traff ic House Probers Subpoena Nixon NEW ORLEANS (UPI) The Coast Guard closed the Mississippi River to most traffic at the Huey P. Long bridge Monday while salvage crews tried to remove a leaking and partially submerged oil barge pinned against the bridge pilings by the current. Two of the barge's 10 compartments continued to teak crude oil into the muddy river. The barge carried an estimated 23,000 barrels of oil and pockets of the drifting goo were sighted as far as 30 miles downriver. Occasionally barges or small vessels were allowed the slip by the bridge at slow speeds when salvage crews took a break, but officials feared the wakes of larger ships might dislodge and sink or further damage the barge. Traffic into and out of New Orleans was not hindered but access to the Gulf of Mexico from north of the city was all but impossible. At least 18 ships were backed up north of the bridge. The barge broke away from the towing tug, the Dixie Buccaneer, Saturday night when a towllne snapped and the barge became stranded against the bridge. There was no damage to the bridge and no one was injured. The barge itself was almost completely submerged and pinned on its side against the bridge piling by the swift current. A Coast Guard spokesman said the barge could not be towed to shore until it was riding level in the water. But it was extremely difficult to get the barge in that position without losing it or breaking open its other oil tanks. Coast Guard officials did not know how long the river might be closed. "It will be shut down until this phase of the salvage is completed, once they feel either that they can't pull it off or they do pull it off," said Coast Guards spokesman Dave Cipra. Oil cleanup crews used a patented Oil Mop device to pick oil off the surface of the water. Other crews of Oil Mop Inc., some 60 men in all, were dispat- crews at points ched in downriver. For a time the greatest pollution fear was that the oil might enter municipal waterworks intakes downriver. "We set out immediately to deploy containment booms to protect them and to contain the pockets of oil along the east and west banks of the river," said company official C. Horton Smith. "Most of the oil pockets are close to the levees and our Oil Mop engines will be able to reach them." Children Sale May Be Hoax NASHVILLE. Tenn. (UPI) The reported sale of two small children for $24 may be a hoax, Nashville police said Monday, and the father of the two boys labeled the affair "a cruel joke." "It could well have happened but it could well be a hoax," said Youth Guidance Officer Judy Bawcum. She said a "Mrs. Williams," who originally reported the sale at a flea market here Sunday,-subsequently denied witnessing the transaction. "She now says she didn't see anything, any transaction, any kind of sale. She says she didn't even see the children," said Miss Bawcum. An all-points bulletin was Issued throughout the Southeast for a couple said to have sold the boys, identified by their father as Howard Andrew Keyes, 4, and Hugh Webster Keyes, 2. Charles Keyes, the boys' father, has been in a hospital in nearby Murfreesboro since being injured in an auto accident last week. "As far as I know my wife is down in Florida with'the two children" he said. "I look at it as just a cruel joke." WASHINGTON (UPI) - The House Judiciary Committee Monday subpoenaed 49 more White House tapes It considers necessary evidence for its impeachment inquiry, despite statements by President Nixon indicating he will release no more material. The subpoenas were approved overwhelmingly by the 38 member committee, with four Republicans opposing two of them and the remaining two passing without audible opposition on voice votes. The subpoenas seek tapes and documents in four areas: the settlement of the government's 1971 antitrust suit against ITT; a $2 million pledge to Nixon's 1972 campaign from milk producers; the Ellsberg break- In and the use of the Internal Revenue Service to harass White House "enemies." The committee's latest action brought to a total of eight the subpoenas served on the White House seeking a total of 147 tapes. Most of those subpoenaed earlier related to the Watergate break-lh and coverup. On June 10 Nixon wrote chairman Peter W. Rodlno a letter Implying the White House would provide no further materials to the impeachment inquiry. "...There would be no end (to the subpoenas) unless a line is drawn somewhere by someone," Nixon said. "Since it is clear that the committee will not draw such a line, I have done so... "I am determined to do nothing which, by the precedents it set, would render the Planning Head Is Urged Here Bay County needs a fulltime planning director now, Willard Byrd, land planner, told the Bay County Commission and Bay County Planning Board at a special workshop meeting Monday afternoon. Willard Byrd told the two groups that the county was in a WEATHER Forecast-Mostly cloudy and mild thru Wednesday , with a chance of rain. Winds North to Northeast, .12 to 22 miles an hour. Low tonight, mid 60s, high mid 80s. Rain chance 50 per cent. TIDES Panama City high 1:20 p.m., low 10:26 p.m.; Port St. Joe high 2:35 p.m., low 12:21 a.m., 11:29 p.m.; Apaiachicola high 9:12 a.m., 9:17 p.m., low 2:17 a.m., 3:55 p.m.; sunrise5:41a.m., sunset 7:44 p.m. River Readings: Jim Woodruff Dam 45.0 Blountstown River Landing 7.0 critical stage in Its development and must not wait even a year before establishing a permanent planning office. County Commission Chairman Isaac Byrd pointed out that the county now has subdivision regulations and a building code. Willard Byrd said the county also needed to be working on a land use plan for the whole county. He said the county should be having small neighborhood meetings to acquaint the people with the planning program. Isaac Byrd said county planning would have nothing to do with land in incorporated cities unless the cities wanted to come In with the county on the program and help share the cost. Willard Byrd said that of the 480,000 acres of land in the county the majority of the land is owned by large companies. He suggested that the county set up a budget to work with and start a five-year planning program. He said the desires for the county should come from its citizens. "This is why I urge you to have small meetings around the county to get the feelings of Its citizens," Willard Byrd said. (See PLANS, Page 2 A) NEWS ROUNDUP— Tax Cut Defeated WASHINGTON (UPI) — The Senate overwhelmingly defeated Monday a tax package which would have cut Income levies and ended several business tax breaks, including the controversial oil depletion allowance. Liberals served notice they would now offer each portion of their package separately in hopes of salvaging some of the legislation which had been offered as amendments to a bill to raise the national debt ceiling. Murder Tapes Disclosed JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (UPI) — Three more tapes from the "Black Liberation Army," claiming responsibility for the murder of two white youths and threatening that "more white devils will die" were received in the mail Monday by two television stations and a radio station. Bomb Destroys Makers BELFAST (UPI) — Two teen-age members of the Irish Republican Army were blown to bits Monday when a bomb they were planting exploded prematurely in the entrance of Londonderry's biggest supermarket, the IRA's Provisional wing said. Three other persons were injured. Tropical Storm Weakens MIAMI (UPI) — A tropical depression in the southern Gulf of Mexico ran Into a pushy cold front Monday and weakened. The cold front was forming a low pressure system of its own over the northeastern Gulf and jvas expected to gobble up the tropical depression, the Nation^Hurricane Center predicted. The Florida peninsula was caught in the middle Monday. Heavy thunderstorms poured over more than half the state. Israelis Battle Arab Guerrillas TEL AVIV (UPI) - Arab guerrillas seized a building in the northern resort town of Nahariyya early Tuesday and. battled Israeli army units for more than 2-Vfc hours before soldiers stormed the building in a hail of rifle and grenade fire. Four persons were killed and four wounded in the attack, reports from the scene said. The Israeli armed forces radio said the wounded were taken away in ambulances to the Nahariyya hospital while soldiers combed the three-story building searching for more casualties. The military command said the guerrillas took over the building around 11:30 p.m. (5:30 p.m. EDT) Monday night and fired sporadically out of windows and tossed grenades into the streets when the army surrounded the area and evacuated neighboring residents. executive branch henceforth and forevermore subservient to the legislative branch," he said. Nixon has provided no actual tapes to the committee, but responded to their initial request by turning over 49 edited transcripts. The committee had received 19 White House tapes from the Watergate grand Jury. The tapes for the milk and ITT tapes were approved 34 to 4 with Republicans Edward Hutchinson of Michigan, Charles E. Wiggins of California, Trent Lott of Mississippi and Delbert Latta of Ohio in opposition. The other two passed on a voice vote without apposition. In addition to requesting tapes, the subpoenas demand that White House notes and memos from Nixon's top aides, and copies of the dally presidential news summary be turned over. The subpoenaed tapes fall into these areas: —Ten tapes of meetings among Nixon and his aides Charles W. Colson and H. R. Haldeman where activities of the White House "plumbers" and Dr. Daniel Ellsberg's leaking the Pentagon Papers were allegedly discussed. —Two tapes of White House conversations on Sept. 15,1972, when Nixon allegedly discussed with his aides the use of the IRS to harass "enemies" of the administration and to help "friends" who had tax problems. —Eighteen tapes during late March of 1971. SURRENDERS - William B. Orkin (left) millionaire heir to the Orkin Pest Control fortune surrenders to Atlanta authorities Monday to answer a charge of conspiring to commit murder. A Grand Jury indictment states that Orkin and an employee conspired to kill Gerald W. Johnson, Atlanta. Johnson's wife is a former employee in Orkin's real estate office. (ByUPI) Cattlemen Loan Passed In Senate WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Senate Monday gave quick approval to legislation authorizing an open - ended emergency loan program to aid livestock producers facing bankruptcy as a result of declining meat prices. The bill was sent to the House where similar legislation is under consideration. Senators made one major change in the bill —unanimously passing an amendment to remove a $3 billion ceiling on the loan program and to limit the individual livestock producer to a $350,000 maximum loan. The emergency loan legislation, which covers cattle, pork and poultry producers, is considered the quickest and most effective relief from a financial crisis created by steady drops in prices for animals sold for slaughter. Sen. George S. McGovern, D- S.D., the bill's chief sponsor, said the amendment greatly strengthens the legislation, both by ensuring that the agriculture secretary will have enough loan authority to meet all legitimate needs and by lowering the limit on individual loans to reduce consumer opposition. Originally, the Senate proposal would have set a maximum loan ceiling of $1 million per ' individual borrower. However, last week farm bloc congress- missiles more or less," Jackson said. "The issue is the withholding from the Congress and the American people of a secret agreement." Senate sources said Kissinger told the committee the documents had been kept secret because it was thought they were consistent with the earlier public announcements on the arms agreement. Earlier in the day, Jackson read newsmen an excerpt from one of the documents which said. over Kissinger's signature that. the agreement must remain secret "since the Soviet Union has not given its assent for public release at this time." There was no immediate clarification of just what the loophole consisted of, but in his press conference remarks early in the day Kissinger had referred to what he called a "super-clever Interpretation of a clause" which could Involve converting old diesel submarines to carry modern missiles with nuclear warheads. Kissinger said that the ' allowable number of such conversions was not nailed downs.- because "It would be absurd for^ the Soviet Union to develop, missile for a submarine that ii% in itself obsolescent." ' 'lit Whatever the loophole ww&i- however, the sources reportMil' that the administration ^f|- attempted for some tlmeggM; close it but the Russians hwfs» steadfastly refused until laffcf4? Tuesday. Russian negotiators, ttie$4r said, had claimed that they Y were reluctant to agree''tot anything that would modify an agreement reached at much •. higher levels. 7 * : ^ "We now know that the '„ loophole closing will be among <; the agreements signed at the -\ summit," a source said, and added that the remaining con- ' cern was what had to be bargained away to get the loophole closed. Grocery Prices Continue Climb WASHINGTON (UPI) Another increase In middlemen's margins pushed the annual retail cost of a typical food market basket up to $1,733' in May —an increase of 0.3 per cent or $5 from the April rate, an Agriculture Department report showed Monday. The report underlined administration pleas to food industry leaders to hold down consumer grocery bills by shaving the widening gap between the shrinking prices of .raw. farm products and the near-record retail prices consumers are paying. , Meanwhile, Don Paarlberg, director of the department's economics section, told Congress that the margin between what the farmer receives and the consumer pays will continue to increase "substantially" for the remainder of the year. Paarlberg said that the farm- retail price spread would "continue the upward push" as a result of rising wages, energy and material costs and transportation charges. According to the Agriculture Department report, the farm value of foods in the market basket, declining for the fifth consecutive month, tumbled to an annual rate of $690 in May, down $34 from April. But middlemen's margins rose for the fifth consecutive month and reached $1,043 in May, up $39 from April. The margin estimates include : both costs and profits in processing and selling foods. The small May increase in the retail market basket cost ended a one month pause in the escalation of consumer food bills. The market basket cost rose steadily from last November to a record $1,748 in March before retreating to $1,728 in April. The market basket is a selection of U.S. farm-produced food needed to feed a hypothetical household of 3.2 persons for a year. It does not precisely match average family food costs but serves as an indicator of changes in grocery bills. Vis Court Settles Obscenity Cases men moved in the House to lower the limit to $350,000 —the same as small business loans— to make the legislation more palatable to big city lawmakers. Under provisions of the Senate bill, the agriculture secretary is authorized to guarantee 90 per cent repayment of livestock loans issued by private lending institutions at the going interest rate. Consumer opposition to the loan program was possible, however, since retail prices have dropped only slightly and fail to reflect the losses currently facing livestock producers. Cattlemen are estimated to be absorbing losses of $100 to $200 per head on cattle sold for slaughter. Last week, the government announced it would purchase $100 million in beef and pork to help eliminate a glut of meat • There's Mo re INDEX Abby 8B Classified 5-7B Comics 6A Crossword 5B Deaths 2A Editorial 4A Local 7A Society 3A Sports MB Stocks 8A WASHINGTON (UPI) - A sharply divided Supreme Court Monday ruled the film "Carnal Knowledge" not obscene in an opinion giving juries wide leeway to use their own understanding in determining obscenity. Justice William H. Rehnquist spoke for the majority in two cases which were sequels to a landmark 1973 decision designed to give states more clout in the battle against smut. Afterward the court was beset by publishers and film distributors who argued that juries should be instructed to use a statewide obscenity standard because of the difficulty of tailoring books and movies to the tastes of individual communities. In a second opinion, in a Los Angeles case, the court held 5 to 4 that juries may draw on the knowledge of their own communities in cases under the federal law barring the sending of obscene material through the mail. The court said persons whose convictions were on appeal when the 1973 decision was handed down may have any benefit that the new standards might give them. In other Monday actions, the Court: —Deferred until after arguments on July 8 any action on a request by President Nixon for disclosure to him and to the court itself of material that led a grand jury to name Nixon an unindicted co-conspirator in the Watergate coverup. —Ruled 6 to 3 that ex-felons who have served their prison sentences can be barred from voting in state and local elections. —Ruled 6 to 3 that prison inmates have no right to demand interviews with reporters and 5 to 4 that reporters have no First Amendment right t to demand interviews with specific prisoners. —Upheld 5 to 4 the right of unions to discipline supervisory members who cross picket lines to work during a strike. Three of the dissenters said the need for the Court to screen "Carnal Knowledge" in order to decide the case makes it obvious that the new test does not extricate it "from the mire of case-by-case determinations of obscenity." Justices William J. Brennan Jr., Potter Stewart and Thurgood Marshall said the only (See COURT, Page 2A) Nixon Illness Admitted WASHINGTON (UPI) — The White House disclosed Monday that President Nixon recently suffered a circulatory ailment called "phlebitis" but said he is fully recovered and fit to depart Tuesday on his European and Soviet summit trip—a prospective 14-hour-a-day grind of work, pomp and travel. Nixon was scheduled to depart at 8:30 a.m. EDT on an eight-day trip that takes him first to a NATO summit in Brussels and then to a round of talks with Soviet leaders in Moscow. Obviously reluctant to discuss the ailment, several White House aides confirmed' under . questioning that Nixon had suffered "a mild case of phlebitis" —an inflamation of the veins that impedes circulation and sometimes involves clotting —but had recovered from .'it? before he departed on his Ml<fc| (See NIXON, Page ZA)

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