Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland on November 1, 1955 · Page 11
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland · Page 11

Publication:
Location:
Cumberland, Maryland
Issue Date:
Tuesday, November 1, 1955
Page:
Page 11
Start Free Trial
Cancel

TWELVE EVENING TIMES, CUMBERLAND, MD- TUESDAY, NOVEMBER I, 1955 Dial PA-2-4600 for a WANT AD Taker Levee Work On West Side Starts Soon > The -Corps of Engineers hopes work on the West Side flood control levee will get underway within the next two weeks. The levee will begin at Kelly 'Boulevard and extend to the West Side flood wall which was built last year. Meanwhile, the Corps of Engineers is exploring the bed of Wills Creek near Baltimore Street bridge in connection with plans for Section IX of the Cumberland- Ridgeley Flood Protection Program. Rex E. Dexter, resident engineer, said the crew which is drilling in the bed of the creek is making a subsurface investigation to determine the conditions which will be found when the channel work gets underway at'that point. Bids for two sections upstream: will be asked, by the Army En-| gineers this week. | Information on the structure of the bed, and the distance to bedrock, will be vital at the point of the current drilling, site of the new Baltimore Street Bridge and the Western Maryland Railway bridge. Average annual milk production per cow has increased from 3,960 to 6,080 pounds in Indiana during the last 20 years. Assignment: America Gotham's Pied Piper Leads Tours To All Sorts Of Unusual Places (Reg. U. S. Pat. OH.) ; By PHYLLIS BATTELLE = NEW YORK (INS)—What everyone needs in his soul is just a ed the manager to his assistant, blushing. "I'm not sure," said the assist touch, only a whisper, just a soup.^ ..^ { (mk ^ wanls you con of the sincerity of. Hans| gh( ^ hjm lhrough tht> hotcl _.. Hacker. Mr. Hacker is surely the enthusiastic man in the world. He arrived in this country from Vienna 17 years ago. Less than five feet tall, with not the remotest idea of how to speak English, his only way of communication was a griB and the tipping of the hat on his glossy bald head. In blase New York City, this was a sight to be compared with a daisy in the desert. For two years he poked noise essly around the tourist spots, in- eluding the Empire State Building, Radio City and the Staten Island ferry, and in so doing he picked up a few words of English. When he ran out of tourist spots, he turned bold. One day he strode into the manager's office of a ritzy Manhattan hotel, took off his hat, grinned, and put a few words together as spiritedly as possible. "What does he want?" whisper- So aghast was the manager at e wonder--rather than the gall of Hans Hacker, that he gave him a personally conducted tour, with a free lunch in the kitchen. And Hacker has been touring out-of-the-way places ever since. Behind him now, buoyed up by his constant curiosity about the city and its crannies, are more than 400 other persons. He calls them, and they agree to it, the "New York Enthusiasts." "We're the average people," says the little man, still bald, still grinning, "and these things mean a lot to us. We see everything— go on about 40 trips a month—to know what's going on in New York City. Because you don't need to travel around the world, you know, when the whole world is here." Gotham's Pied Piper, who leads his followers by subway and bus routes and signals the strays with a small toy liorn, insists that he has lived all over Europe; that he's been bored in Vienna and Dored in London and bored, even, in Paris. "But never in New York. Here you can see everything from everywhere," In the decade of his career as lead of "N. Y. Enthusiasts," Hacker has taken field trips to every type territory from auto 'actories to spiritualists' seances :o artists' studios and ballet rehearsal halls. Their latest visit was :o the Schenley Distilleries. "I waited four years, for permission to go there. I would like ;o point out we are not a group of whiskey drinkers, but we like .0 see the what, when and how of everything. He waited eight years for the okay to take his eager 400 on a Backstage tour of the Metropolitan Opera House, and it was nine years before Hacker got permission to take his group to police headquarters. "And he needed six .years to get permisioh to see Horn & Hardart'B (automat) commissary, where they make 100 pies a minute. Isn't that terrific?" Not quite so terrific, we felt, as Hans Hacker, enthusiast. "Oh madame, please," blushed Hacker. "Thank you," he added, lifting his hat, shining his head and his grin for an instant, and then rushing out to visit the School of Speech Disorders. Enter Today at GURLEY'S 123 S. LIBERTY ST. CUMBERLAND, MD. Child Wired To Bed, Mom Faces Trial HAGERSTOWN UP) — State's Ally. Tom Kaylor planned to ask a jury trial today for Mrs. Dorothy Twyman, a Negro mother accused oi wiring a 5-year-old son to his bed. I If Kaylor's request is granted at the hearing in magistrate's court, he will present the case to the next grand jury. The 27-year-old woman is charged with contributing to the dependency and ne gleet of the boy.and assault. The child was under treatment at University Hospital for malnutrition. Neighbors who found the boy wired to the bed with a straightened-out coat .hangar took him to a doctor during the weekend. The doctor called police.' Detective G r a y s o n Wigfield quoted Mrs. Twyman, who, has six children and is expecting another, that her son had spells and she had to tie him in bed. Indications were that the boy had been fastened to the foot of the bed and wasn't in it at all, Wigfield said. He said the boy was so weak he could hardly stand, but could talk :o police. James H. Twyman, the boy's father, told police he didn't know anything about it. Wigfield quoted nim that he and his wife didn't let along so she slept upstairs and slept on the first floor. Optimists To Meet An open discussion of new ideas for the club will be conducted at the meeting of the Cumberland Optimist Club at 6:15 p. m. :omorrow at Central YMCA. • City Eyes State Money As Base For Cutting Tax BALTIMORE (ft — City officials may use some of the money that has been coming in from the State for roads to reduce the property tax, if the law allows. The city would like to use three million dollars to finance the po lice department's traffic division, and the Department of Traffic Engineering. This sum 'would equal cents of the property tax, which now supports these two • units. T.he State collects money in gas oline taxes and motor vehicle license fees, and then redistributes if to the counties and Baltimore City. However, the law states that such redistributed money is to be used for either construction -or maintenance of roads and "for no other purpose." City Solicitor Thomas N. Biddison s^id yesterday he 'is planning a court action to test if it is legal to divert such funds to the traffic division.and traffic engineering or ganizatibns: ' • Irate Laundry Customer "Comes Clean" On Thefts HOUSTON, Tex. UP)—Robert L. Manley pleaded guilty to indictments of four burglaries at a laundry. District Judge Edmund Duggan asked him why he picked on that particular place. "I had a grudge against the laundry," Manley said. "I went there one. day just past closing time a'nd the man wouldn't give me my clothes." Duggan gave Manley 10 years. Power Plant Site Decision By Firm Due WASHINGTON OB—The Potomac! Electric Power Co. is to decidej today whether to build a gener-! ating plant in Louddun County, Va.i The plant on the Potomac River! would cost 100 million dollars. The power co'mpany has put a! $24,000 deposit on 519 acres of land owned on the Virginia side of the river by the Triple Seven Stock Farm. If it doesn't pay the $255.000 due, it will forfeit the deposit. Montgomery County in Maryland has been trying to persuade j the company to locate there. It isj arguing that since the power will! be sold. in 'Maryland, the state should .get the- taxes;from the plant: Washington -officials also have expressed concern that the proposed Virginia location would; threaten the district's water sup-! ply purity. . • 'I Traveling Salesman Finds Nothing Sacred The surface of Lake Titicaca in South America is 1.250 feet higher than the summit of Mt. Hood, Ore. Scientists list the praying mantis as the. only insect that can turn its head. PHOENIX, Ariz.'UV-A'traveling salesman reported this theft to police with mixed feelings: One Bible, three books on religion and some blanks to be used in ordering religious articles. The articles were taken while he left his car in-a parking lot. Lilya Returns Home County Investigator Edwin R. Lilya, 220 Carroll Street, has returned to his home from Memorial Hospital, where he had been a patient for several weeks. Now! a 5 °° bill adds ... Auto Personal Accident Insurance fo your liability policy IF YOUR CAR IS INSURED BY CONLON Get details of this new service for insured with the service-minded agency A LOT of Protection For LITTLE Cost $5,000 to $10,000 Death Benefit $25 to $50 Weekly Income Total Disability Benefit When a serious accident happens, your first question will be: "Have I the Best Protection" Call PA 4-6776 For Rate Folder ConSon Insurance • WE'RE CLEARING THE DECKS Down Go Prices On Floor Samples To Make Way For Christmas Displays! SALE-ONE WEEK ONLY Nearly all specials — one of a kind - no reservations - no cancellations — but same personalized easy terms no extra! COLONIAL DRESSER SOLID MAPLE Chest on chest- -Paster bed- Regular $215. for $179. MODERN SUN TAN BEDROOM SUITE Regular $250.—Clearance $195 SAVINGS FOR EVERYBODY PLATE GLASS MIRROR—Gold leaf frame $20 value TWIN MAPLE POSTER BEDS — Regular $35 — Now $24.50 WROUGHT IRON MAGAZINE BASKET — Special , $14,95 $5,95 IAZY-BACK PILLOWS — Washable — foam rubb.r filling Decorator colon — Rtgular $7.95 Clearanc 25 CHAIRS — Lounge — Occaiionol — Modern — Values up ot $69 — Choice Organization Meeting Set For Slanip Club The organization meeting for the City Recreation Department's Stamp Club will be held at 8 p. m. in the Council Chamber at City Hall. Robert E. Pence, rec director, said about a dozen persons have indicated interest in the activity. All those interested in stamp collecting, he said, are invited to join the club, which has .10 age limit. BRONZE TORCHIERE — $35 value — three 16 sell at LaVoIc Store Phone PA 2-6430 STORE HOURS:— Mon. to Fri 9 til 9 Saturday 9 til 6 166N. Centre St. Phone PA 2-7445 STORE HOURS:— Monday to Friday . . 9 to 5 Saturday 9 to 6 ?MNCH TABLE ENSEMBLE ... ROSEWOOD MAHOGANY-FINISHED . . . GRACEFULLY-STYLED WOODEN LEGS ... SUPERB BEAUTY IN BALANCED DESIGN. Custom V ... wW the difference you can see! • Brand-new styling in your choice of handsome wood finishes! • 7-League Chassis... so powerful it's like moving the television station into your back yard! • UHF, too! Simple, easy-to-mstall strip converters allow" economical conversion from VHF at any time. JUST $10,00 DOWN AS LOW AS $1.82 A WEEK HtW CROSLEY JV SETS AS LOW AS $129.95 CORDOVAN MAHOGANY MODERN BEDROOM Dresser — Chest — Bed — $300. value for Floor Sample $195. 5-PC, WROUGHT IRON DINETTE - Special $59.95 7-Piece Giant Chrome Set — Table opens to 6 feet 1 Arm — 5 Side Chain — Foam Rubber 0QQ QC seats — $149 value — oil for RUG SAMPLES One of a kind—Values to $18 27 x 48 . . $5.95 36 x 60 . . $9.95 Discontinued Lees JSroadloom 199 SOFA BED in tapestry cover $79,50 DREXEL DESK-VANITY — A powder table and desk combined in luicipui satin finith with chair — For hall, ffQA CA bedroom or den. Regular $150 — Clearance .. V*' 1 '"' TV SNACK TABLE — Mahogany — Folds BERKLINE PLATFORM ROCKERS — Nylon jcover 04Q over rubber — 2 only tBleJl a tet Regular $10 4 " $4,95 $10,95 Englander Bed Line, Box Spring AND FOAM RUBBER MATTRESS—in discontinued covers. Regular $149—for . . . JUNIOR DINING GROUP Cabinet china—Extension table— 4 chairs—Red plastic seats and mobile serving table — All tops, formica—Mar-proof — Limed oak —$400 value — all pieces. $200 THE NEW HASSOCKS — In brilliant colors — tough plastic — "Serves at chair, footrest and storage space. C*C QR on ^ • V*»iWW Vast variety up CHERRY BEDROOM SUITE — Double Dretter — Che.t — Spindel Bed — Reg. $350, for BARRELL CHAIR — Regular $59.50 — Gold tapeitry .. . $39,50 MAPLE LADDER BACK CHAIRS With woven Rattan seats—Chairs $10.95 LANE CEDAR CHESTS Value for the early Xmas shop-Q^Q §fl per ... Regular $59.95. . ¥™V»WV Pay $1 A Week » LIVING ROOM SUITE By International. Loompomt 194.50 Hurry for This One—Easy Terms! SaveSIOO-Hepplewhite Drexel BEDROOM Mahogany with double dresser,' hugh framed mirror — Serpent tine 5-drawer chest — Distinctive) 'bed — Regular $400. One only, j 299. On Easy. Terms! TV CHAIR — Tweed effect plastic $14,95 OCCASIONAL CHAIRS Blonde arms — Frieze covers in red, grey, blue, green — $39.75 — COQ Regular-Choice <?«W« BRASS COLONIAL TABLE LAMPS — Green or red shade •. UNFINISHED CHIST — ROBE {For nursery .., $29,95 HIYWOOO'ASHCRAFT OCCASIONAL TABLE — «1C 75 Regular $45 for ^ I Hi IV OAK AND WALNUT NIGHT TABLES Values to $39 — choice $19.50 NYLON-COVERED LIVING ROOM SUITE $229. Regular $295— Clearance INDIA CHOR RUGS — » x 1Z — li inch thick — Reversible — Regular $39 for $5,95 $19,75 ROLLAWAY COT — Have an extra bedroom with a rollaway cet. Complete with fine innerspring mattress. Opens to full bed length CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY BEDROOM SUITE Double dresser — chest — Lyre trimmed — Bed — Night table — Regular $450. — Clearance. $329 FAMOUS UES — HEAVENIY CARPEV — » x 13 — CCQ Deep pile — Axmlniter — Regular $M ...;".... Ipww HAH AND STAIR CARPET — 77 Inches wide * - Speci.l y«rd BEAUTIFUL BARREL BACK CHAIRS S49.85 . Solid mahogany in Matclasse| covers—$89. Values—Just 2 — ati SAVE $10 ON A STRATOLOUNGER Beige — Brown — Blue and Green — Choice ... $89.50 i 4 T N. MECHANIC STREET E NEMAN 2 The Store DEVOTED To Your Home 100 Specials Is Not Listed TRUNDLE BED Black masic — Trro twin beds nested to take but space of one, with springs and two innerspri mattresses—4125 value — all for' MATCHING CROUP OF IAMPI — H.lf Price! S«l* In miKriifif, »titi cnly ............ wen SI.H

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free