The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on May 4, 1997 · Page 89
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 89

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Salina, Kansas
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Sunday, May 4, 1997
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Page 89
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IB SUNDAY..MAY4, ; 1997 NATIONAL PARKS THE SALINA JOURNAL Sounds of Some fear tourist flights are disturbing the solitude of national parks for those on ground "/ wait. Now the night flows back, the mighty stillness embraces and includes me; I can see the stars again and the world of starlight. I am twenty miles or more from the nearest fellow human, but instead of loneliness I feel loveliness. Loveliness and a quiet exultation." — • Edward Abbey, "Desert Solitaire" By ROBERT WELLER The Associated Press Mi •OAB, Utah — If he were still alive, desert anarchist Edward Abbey could whisper in .wonder about the Hale-Bopp comet, but many campers would be within hearing distance. In the late 1950s, a few thousand visitors passed his National Park Service trailer. This year, more than 900,000 will visit Arches National Park, and the number of visitors to neighboring Canyon- lands will top 450,000. Still, both are considered the creme de la creme for those who seek silence. In the meantime, the debate is still coalescing in urban areas over what noise does to the quality of life. It is slowly becoming an issue in natural environments as well. "What I hope the American people will recognize before it's too late that there are a few of these places where we want to recognize natural sound as a national resource," said Walt Dabney, superintendent of Arches, Canyonlands and Natural Bridges National Monument. Abbey, in his "Desert Solitaire," preferred to talk about "a great stillness" rather than silence. "... for there are a few sounds: the creak of some bird in a juniper tree, an eddy of wind which passes and fades like a sigh, the ticking of the watch on my wrist — slight noises which break the sensation of absolute silence but at the same time exaggerate my sense of the surrounding, overwhelming peace." Dabney says, "Sometimes you can sit out there and your ears will ring because it is so quiet. It's as quiet as a professional recording studio. You can absolutely hear rocks fall without the sound of some airplane circling overhead." In Cataract Canyon, on the mighty Colorado River, "the rapids can be deafening. But it's natural." Dabney and others in the Park Service also fear the curse some believe Abbey put on the Moab parks. By writing of their beauty he enticed millions to come visit them. Talking about the quiet that remains could do the very same, they opine. Parks have the power to turn down the volume in boom boxes and RV stereos. The National Parks and Conservation Association is pushing the Clinton administration to restrict flights. Nearly a. third of the nation's parks are plagued by aircraft noise, the Park Service has reported to Congress. Dabney said the parks' officials have no way to stop flights over Old Faithful at Yellowstone, ruining the experience of 2,500 people on the boardwalk for the pleasure of a handful. Most attention has focused on the Grand Canyon, where more than 800,000 people take fixed-wing or helicopter sightseeing trips yearly. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced last year plans to radically limit Grand Canyon flights but backed off when air operators filed a federal lawsuit. Bonnie Lindgren, operator-manager for Redtail Aviation Inc. in Moab and treasurer of the U.S. Air Tours Operators Association, said, "If the approach will be reasonable and balanced we will accept restrictions." She said the Park Service until recently had wanted to wrest control of flights from the Federal Aviation Administration so it could ban them completely. "I don't fault the Park Service for wanting to have some control over flights over the parks," she said, agreeing with Dabney that it "would be a terrible scenario" for helicopters to be buzzing Old Faithful. She said her company, which operates 93 percent of the park flights in the Moab area, has offered to coordinate with the Park Service by avoiding areas where hikers have registered to travel. Perhaps the only incontestable thing in the debate is that those who want their silence pure best get it now. arquette, \ansas Historic Kuny School Museum. Completely restored to original dtcitr. Museum oftni Sundays 1-5 May thru October. For more information on tours, events or museum contact: Marquette Farmers State Bank, 205 N. Washington, Marquette, KS 67484. (913) 546-2292 HatuQii-Liudfon Mansion on the National Register of Historic Places. Have You Heard? Fly Salina" "For friendly people, no hassles, no long drives. BStCVMW, KS. US AIRWAYS Call your local agent or USAirways/USAirvuays Express at 825-7256 for details, or visit our website at http://wvuvu.salair.org You'll Find Something For The Whole Family in ELLIS, KS Visit the founder of the Chrysler Corporation, Walter P. Chrysler's Boyhood Home & Museum. Take a ride on a scale model train and relive Ellis' rich railroad past at the Railroad Museum. The museum is also home to 1,625 dolls which are proudly on display. The Bukovina Society Museum exhibits photographs and artifacts from the families that emigrated to Ellis. Ellis offers an antique mall, craft shops, parks and restaurants. Come and stay at Lakeside Campground. Enjoy a day of golfing, swimming or sightseeing in a quiet, small town setting. Join us for fun on these dates: June 13 & 14 - Big Creek Riverfest, Car Show & Pickn' in the Park July 28-Aug. 2-Ellis Jr. Free Fair Aug. 2 - Ellis Railroad Days Sept. 20 - Oktoberfest Contact Ellis Chamber of Commerce 913-726-3636 for information Located just off 1-70 at exit 145,15 miles west of Hays Restored Victorian downtow building with one of two n featured in Maraut Fago(xloklfashiaiedho(T«a)oking,comeofihome to Grandma Maxs'. Prom hearty burgers and spicy fajitas to our light entrees and scrumptious buffets, there's always something for everyone. BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER LUNCH & DINNER BUFFETS Daily 11 am to 9pm WEEKEND BREAKFAST BAR 7:00 am 10 10:30 am • Open 24 hours a day, every day of the year. • Special holiday buffets »Seniors & Childrens menu • Carryout available Bosselman "travel Center 1944 North 9lh 913-825-5023 Salina grandma. ¥* restaurant

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