Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland on October 26, 1955 · Page 15
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Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland · Page 15

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Wednesday, October 26, 1955
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EVENING TIMES, CUMBERLAND, MD.,/'. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER ,,26, 1955 FIFTEEN Tremendous ver Lions ly Thi rViHcioted Preii Bruce Bosley,' West. -Virginia •tackle once described by coach ,^rt Lewis as "the mail I'd most hSte'to meet in a dark alley" was 'selected.'today as the, Associated 'Press Lineman of the Week. ; •" ! Bosley, a 225-pound senior from Greenbank, ,W;' Va., earned the award .for'his play last Saturday .that .helped the 7th-ranked Moun- 'taincers .overpower an inspired '•"Penn State'21-7. , jf. :; ' Great In Stcond Half '"Big Bruce played a.tremendous gam* in the second half as the ' Mountaineers came' from behind to "b'3at the : Nitlany Lions. He was ^cdristantly breaking -through and •''dumping State's backs : for losses: •i'With-the score tied at 7-7 Bruce • helped set up-what'proved to be •West' Virginia's winning touch- d(,wn. State got the ball oh its <bwn 17. Bruce stopped two State running plays and- on third down, > broke up an attempted forward "pass. State had .to punt. The Mountaineers took.over ; and drqye for a score with Bruce providing some good interference. : "This is not the first time Bosley : has won Lineman of the Week hon- •brs. As » sophomore in 1953 he •also gained the coveted award. '•j Peilfgrinl Commended .-, .Other.-tackles -v/ete. prominent ,-among the linemen nominated in »the weekly Associated Press, poll •tof sportswriters and broadcasters. ' iJohn Linneinanstons of Mar- squctte made 17,-tackles and two assists as-the Warriors held Boston College to >a 13-13 tie. .Tom Powell of Colgate led the line play that gave-Colgate a 7-0 upset victory over Yale. Charlie Gibbons did the same as Rhode ..Island surprised Brown 19-7. Fred • Robinson of Washington played a • big game in a 7-7 tie with Stanford ! and Bob Pollock ot Pitt was equal, ly .effective as the Panthers-upset Duke 26-7. ; . Bob Pellegrini, Maryland center, was commended for his play -against Syracuse. jiiidiaiia Beagle ^Scores In "Trial ; The four-day licensed field trial 'of the Aliegany Beagle Club con- ^rluded yesterday on the Barton «»>airy Farm with Martoney Lady, )owned by N.. M. Hoidsworth, of ? Indiana,'Pa.,'being adjudged win- •ner of the 15-inch .female class. •• There were 2-1 bntries on the fin- 'ni day, increasing the total to 113 •; hounds judged during the four • days, a new record for the nine- year history of the event. The only Cumberland hound to place was D. C. Stone's Shady - liidge Dixie which finished second yesterday. Yesterday's results: 1. Marteney Lady, owned by'N. M Hoidsworth, Indiana, Pa., handled by Mrs. Marteney. 2. Shady Ridee. o«ned by D. C. Stone, Cumberland, handled by John Armstrong, Triple Lakes 3. Faithful Chase Bonnie, owned and handled by Rev, Clalr Gartland, Cone 4 Windy Hill, owned by B. M. Holds »urth, Indiana, Pa., handled by Mil Hoidsworth... - Reserve: Dixie Tess, owned by Tom Moor* Jr.-, Port Washington, Ohio, handled by Tom Moot* Sr.l Piuiks Rap Clowiis Taking Grid Tide Scoring single ' touchdowns -in every -period, the Park Punks eaS' ily defeated the Clowns, 24 to 6, yesterday at' Penn Avenue Field to take the championship of the Men's Division in the City Rec Touch Football Le'ague. Ronnie Cage passed for.lhfee of the TDs. George SchoenadeFs 12-yard pass to Cage netted the .initial score of the game. Cage passed to Johnny Price for 10 yards to "Brindle 1 Long for 10 yards and to Price for 37 yards'for the Punks' tds in the second, third and fourth stanzas. Pete Wageley hit-Ronnie Twigg • with a 20-yard aerial for the losers touchdown.- PARK PUNKS 686 5-S< CLOWNS ,.:..' 006 0— I Touchdowns scored by Price 2, Long Cage (Park'PMks): Twigg (Clowns). Alco Eleven (Continued from Page 14) ; last year's standout club, , hasn' been' much of a threat to anyone since walloping. Petersburg. For the five games, the Explorers have been shut out twice and have been able to register 'but : nine TDs— five in the 'Petersburg rout. None of the six-pointers has been by passing • although : LaSalle has 'thrown skyward'55 times and com ,/fletcd 18. The ground game was gklmost nothing. against. both. For *Hill and Keyscr, a total net yard age on land being worth but 4. '•' ' Iv.flio Explorers', biggest -ground "gainer for -the 1 tally was .Mickey Bush's 68-yard run against Peters : btirg, while Jim Struntz ripped of !"f\ '63-yardcr and quarterback Bills -Buzzard got in jaunts of 47 and 4 iyards. • . ; .-"\ <• '.' '; A desperate effort to pull.the SI •'• Francis game out of the fire failed {Although LaSalle banged from be hind, 1M, to score M points In .the 5 final quarter. An Intercepted pas i and-poor punt led to the Green • Wave's, downfall early In-the con '*• With 117 points In the five, starts I. Aliegany will enter the Friday fray s-with.i 33.4 per-game average. l» , t $»Mi M. .counters nhow an it. 'mark for eacfi-tussle. . ", TOP LINEMAN—This is Bruce Bosley, West .Virginia University's rugged tackle,'who was selected Associated Press, Lineman of Week for his great play in the unbeaten Mountaineers' 21-7 win over Penn State last Saturday at Morgantown. Ceyser Jayvees Sweep Aliegany Deprived of an earlier touchdown ue to" an illegal motion penalty, onald "Bud" Smith came back the last quarter with a scoring ass-to Jerry Shumaker that gave cyser-High's Jayvees a 7-0 vic- ory over.Allegany's Reserves yes- erday at Campobello. Smith also el up the winning play by inter- epting a pass and running it back yards to the Alco five. .> Keyser. failed to gain .oh the round in two plays. Then, Smith t Shumaker.in the end zone for he TD and Smith kicked the extra oint. The win enabled the Little ornadoes to sweep their two- ame series with Aliegany. A 48-yard gallop by Gary Shook eatured for the vanquished Camp- rs. -Each team made five firsl owns- but Aliegany. had a slight dge in net yards.gained rushing, 94 to 59." The winners completed •wo of five passes and Aliegany ne of seven. Kcrier (7) ' Allefi . Careinuu st°u»er nr«n Siller llnrrain : Crimn MeElwce Leasure G Morg«n : Rcsroiil T D»vl» i M«rtz E ' Shnmiktr Fortr Smith ...: Shook Hollinitworth LowendlcK H B. Boor Stewart B F. Boor Vanetta Scor* by period!: EYSER 0 0 » •'-' U.EOANV 0000-0 Touchdown icored by ShumaKcr. Pplnt alter touchdown scored by Smith, SubjtHulci: Keyser — Wilson, WeniCl hoemaker, Kuykcnda!!, Stiyder. Alle any—Tice. Earthmn, Walker, McKemie chramm, "NorrU, Davli, Whltworth elawdcr. Vliunicks Heads Church Circuit Russ Mlnnicks was elected pros- dent, Walt Henry, vice president nd Clifton Van Roby was re-elect- d secretary-treasurer at the pre- eason meeting of-'the Centra MCA Sunday School Basketball x:ague last night at the "Y", Plans were again discussed for plitting the bulky league into two ivisions, a move that was de- eatcd last year when 29 teams articipaled. A committee composed of An lavis, Joe Wagner, Lance Statler ack Livengood and Rev. Arthur crogum will meet with the board f governors next Tuesday to de idc on whether the league wil perate in two divisions. Deadline for team 'forfeit fees is Tuesday. > The nest regular meeting of th< eague will be held Tuesday. No •ember 8. ' Twenty-two churches were rep esented at last night's session, in luding two newcomers, Calvary Baptist and St. Philip's Episcopal hewies Stretch lot-Rod Dux Leac » •': Chevroiets power-glided into a wo-gamc ' lead in the Hot-Roi lixed Bowling League by blanking lymouths. 3-0, while Dodges were jeiiig'held to a 2-1 win over De >otas and . Fords whipped Mer uries, 2-1. John Lindeman topped the scor rs with a 160-411 total for Mer uries. Other team' leaders wcr 'Buck" Benson, Fords, 155-364 toward Schaidt, Chevroiets, 153 96; Frank Drake, 'Plymouths, 158 405; Don Layton, Dodges, 133-343 Me Layton, DeSotas, 133-355 Handings: W. L. W. I Chevrolet* ... 9 3 DcSolai 5 Bobcats Rout Indiana, 9-1, [n Power Show Scoring early and often, the Bob- als of Frostburg State Teachers College went on a rampage to bijry ndiana State's soccer team .under pile of nine points yesterday at ndiana, Pa. The score of 9 to 1 was the most decisive victory ever ecorded by a Bobcat team under <en Babcock who is in his ninth easori at. the Frbstburg college. Tommy Kelly led the. attack with iree tallies and even big Enordo 'Moose" Arnone, the Frostburg ;oal tender, got into the act with i penalty boot. John Horine; Don Jell. Fred Downs, Bill Salesky and Carl Emerick accounted for the thcr goals. Horine scored in the opening leripd on a pass from Kelly. The iobcats connected for four markers in the second quarter, three of which were credited to Kelly. The ither was by Bell. • Before intermission, Armel of Indiana, made good on a penalty try ifter Frostburg's substitute goalie ailed to report to the referee. Arnone scored the first point of his high school and college soccer career by booting a penalty goal n.the third period and Downs later allied on a pass from Preston to up the score to 7-1. Goals by Salesky and Emerick' were registered n the final stanza. "Bar* Hershey, Indiana forward, suffered a fracture of .the left-forearm in the opening period when he collided with "Buddy" Poland and ell to the ground. . The victory ,was Frostburg's third against one Irrs -nd a lie. The Bobcats windup li;:ir season Saturday with Ml. St. Mary's Col- ege at Emmitsburg, Md. -.-. •M. Frostb«r£ <»> Indiana (1) ;oal Arnone Varner RB . Buddy Poland ;...CUtes Clark Kneyovicb RHB Jim Poland ". .. Visovslur CHB R. Kirk EtaMl LHB KtUter Fabian OR Bell Hcrshcs R . Salesky Shubert CF Kelly :..... Arme! ' Horine Utllejohn OL Emerick...: SUlJl Scere by periods: FHOSTBURC 1 J 1 l-S NDIANA 0 1 0 0—1 Field foala «cored by Kelly 3, Horine BeU, Downi, Emtrick, Saleiky (Frost- Penalty Koals icored by Arnone (Frost- bore)! Arm«l (Indiana). SnbaUUlea: Froitbnrs—C. Smith. Haw Mna. Carter, Montan. Do«-|U, Harvey •>reston, Mllltr. Lennox, Checcihetto, :ndiana-~Hakanen. Heferee— Marcln. Tapping (Continued from Page 14) widely known for his basebal stories When the Nation al League won both the All-Star >ame and World Series this year t was the first time since 1944 that the senior circuit had^made a clean sweep of the Americans.. The 1944 match was played a night in Pittsburgh's Forbes Field the score being 7 to 1... Pitching 'or .the winners were Bucky Wai lers, Ken Ratfensberger, Rip Scwell and Jim Tobin.. '. The Ser es was an all-St. Louis show, the Cardinals winning over the Browns, four games to two ... Joe Snyder reports that Hag •rstown High is endeavoring to h 'et together with Eastern of Wash ,ngton in both football and basket ball... The Hagerstown HeraU columnist also says that Buckj McDonald, the high-scoring ' has kctball forward with the Fairchil( Packets and the Martinsburg Pen Mar League team last year, i attending George Washington Uni versity and will be eligible for th cage sport there A ca pacity crowd of 60,000 is expectet to see West Virginia battle Pitts burgh Saturday, November 12, ii Pitt Stadium... The Panthers are reserving all seats for the contest ... All of the ?3.50 tickets have been sold and the only ones remaining are about 12,000 in tht dcinity of the end zone. LONG SHOT WINS BIG BRITISH STAKES RACF NEWMARKET, England Ifl-Re trial, an English-owned 18 to shot, won the 113th running of the Cambridgeshire Handicap Stakes today. Turk's Blood was second and Swept was third. The favorei Manati finished out of the money. ' ALL-STAR STOKES NEW YORK —(NBA)— Maurici Stokes, who stood out at St, Fran cis of Loretto, Pa., will play with the College All-Stars against tin professional basketball New Yorl Knickerbockers at Madison Squan Garden, Oct 30. ' HERi'S THE JOB WE OFFER! (1) $300 guaranteed minimum monthly income to start as trainee, ceiling unlimited. Our experienced -' men earn from $10,000 a year up. : (2) Life-time opportunity-r-no age termination. (3) .Sales : organization with over 10,000 satisfied salesmen covering all 48 STATES. (4). Thorough training at National Sales Training • School. Salary and expenses paid during training: • .period. . ' •- ' ' (5) Company you'll be proud to represent. Largest of ' its; kind insthe world. Over $100,000,000 in as•• sets'!'Nationally advertised. : ; ....'• (6) No shortages—no slack period. : ' ; . (7) Rapid advancement for men .with .management •1':' potential; ,who^ demonstrate\theif ability,.' • -v ' Sounds too good to be true? Let.us show.'you. If'yoii have.s food'appearance, like to make money and are willing to work, you may quality. Must'have a car. Our own associates have: • beep informed of this add. Phone Fort Cumberland Hotel, PA M400. Monday;, Tuesday or ^Wednesday; and a*k tor .Mr; Bay StroUwrtv tfvv. •- '' '.v,V •>.••'•••• r -"".'.--- . •'.- '••'. Vt* «*iti COUIGE fbOTIAtl fbWEI IHOR '. I TW tarn l*4ti MtJAfi irt ftti a«rHrmtM« IXFUMATION } •» jt« • M.O (MI. h.i kMK 10 turinf «*»•• »«*•',' e« V (<M, rim • 4».» iM«i, Sooners, Terps And Michigan Elide Favorites Com** of.Wetk Ending October 30, 1955 AMONG TOP 150 Rating. 1 Lawef . Hirer .• Dflf. 'Rittf iATURDAY, OCTOBHt » , Army '97.1 (101 Collate —. «.t Auburn _. 102.7 (11) Tulane — '91.9 Bowl: Gr'n. 71.1 (151 Marihall - '82.8 Chatt'n'ga _ 73.9 ( 8) Dayton — '68.0 Cleriiaon _ '82.9 (101 W'ke rorert 82.8 Col. Pacific '87.0 (141 Waih. State es.i Colorado - 'US («) Miisourl — 77.1 Colo. AtM . SO.S l») Montana._ -52.1 Cornell -71.1 (10) Columbia _ 6U- Delaware _ 72.7 ( 2) Rut««r« _ •ID.K Denver 77.7 (») N. Mexico '53.1 Detroit 77.8 (10) Cincinnati "67.3 G; Wa'sh'ton 78.5 12) Va:'Tech - '78.5 Georgia _ *87.7 (11) Alabama _ 76.9 Ga. Tech '102.5 ( 8) Duke —:— 93.1 Gettysburg '75.3 ( 5) Lafayette _ 70.5 Harvard _. -««.7 (10) BuckneU _ 59.1 Houston U. -89.0 (!9) WlchiU _ 70.5 Indiana _ '85.5 (13) Ohio U. — 72.4 ' Iowa State _ 78.J (22) Drake -5S.O Kentucky 'M.7 ( I) Rice 88.8 Lehijh — '75.4 (351 Temple — 40.1 La. Tech _ -73.1 (13) SW.LaJnit. 80.1 Maryland •109.2 (37) S. Carolina 72.2 Miami, Fla.'lOU ( 2) PitUburih -98.8 Miami. 0. _. 97.1 (22) Kent St. _- "7C.8 Michigan '109.3 (17) Iowa : 92.8 Mich. State 109.0 (12) Wisconsin '96.5 Mississippi - 81.1 [ «) L, S. U. _' -92.3 Miss. State -88.7 (J7I N. Texal St. 72.0 Nebraska - -71.8 ( 4) Kanus 74.8 NC. State 78.8 (34) Furman _r '44.7 Not Dame '105.5 I 1) Navy 104.5 Ohio State '99.8 (19) N'wertern _ 81.1 Oklahomi I11.S (26) K.n«u St. '85.1 : Oreson i_ '8«J (25) Idaho tl.5 Penn State - 90.9 (29) Penn -61.8 Princeton - '79.5 (11) Bro»n 68.6 • Purdue 90.1 ( 3) niinois 1_ '88.3 S. Call!. _ 104.8 (14) Minnesota '90.S S. M. U. - '100J ( 3) Texas M.o Stanford '91.0 ( 7) San Joie St. 83.9 Syracuse _ 97.0 (10) Holy Cross -87.0 Tempe St '77.8 (10) HardnSim's 67.7 Tennessee " 93.4 (22) N. Carolina '71.0 ' Texas AHf 107.1 (13) Arkansas _ '94.3 T. C. U. 104.7 ( 51 Baylor — '100.1 Tex. Tech '84J (13) W. Texas St. 71.7 TexWest'n -90.J (50) NiL A4M _ 40.8 Trinity, T. _ 73.9 (11) SELouls'na -63J Tulsa . 73J ( 41 Okla. AtM '89.3 U. C. L. A. '107.1 (32) California _ 75.0 Vanderbilt '91.8 (19) Virginia 72.8 Vlllanova '68.9 ( 0) Richmond tS.4 WasMnil'n. '98J (141 Orejon St. _ 82.4 W Virginia 100.9 (29) Marquette '72J Wm.Mlary -72.1 (27) V. M. I. — S5.8 Wyomlnj _ '83.0 140) Brig. Young 4SJ Xavier, O. '83J ( 0) Boston Col. 83J yal, _: '85.8 (17) Dartmotfth - 69.0 OTHER EASTERN TRrDAY, OCTOBER 38 WCheiter - 'M.l (15) Klni's n.T SATURDAY. OCTOBER 19 Alfr'td '51.7 (J3) Buffalo 18.5 AT C '40.9 I 4) NBrltainSt 3S.4 S, t ts 37J ( 4) Bowdoln _ '33.4 Bethany 48.0 (25) Allelheny '22.2 Brandeis — 58.7 (»1) Bridgeport .'25.4 Calif. St. J '45.5 (101 Clarion St.- 35.1 Carnegie T. - 47.9 128) W 4 J : '19J. Connectlc't '(3.9 ( 1) N ll'pshlra 61.8- Cortland „ '50.1 (16) Hofstra 1.34.5 Drexel _ 'SI.9 121) 1. Hopkins _ 30.4 EStroudsbg '33.4 (18) Kutitown - «.' Hobart — '47.3 ( 9) St. Lawr'ce 37.9 Ithaca ^ 26.8 (10) Brockport ' '16.3 Junlata '46.0 (45) Susq'hanna •_-1.0 Lock Haven 46.9 (27) Indlana.Pa. '30,3 Maine -^ 65.9 (29) Colby ——• '36.5 Mass. U. _ *57.0 (15) Vermont — 41.8 Moravian _ '59.4 (11) Albright _ 48.7 Muhlenb'g '53.1 (12) Scranton __i.41.J NHavenSt. '51.0 (10) Bloomsburg .41.0. Norwich ^ '38.5.( 5) Mlddlebury 31.8 P. M. C _ 50.2 (14) Lycoming '35.9 R. Island - '71.8 (13) Springfield 56.4 Rochester '34.5 (15) oWlin — 19.2 Shin-rub 1 ! '41 i 117) Hillersville . 25.1 Slip. Roclc '42.4 ( OI'.Geneva 42.3 Thlel - '«.! (27) Grove City '20.4 Trinity,- C. _ 63.4 ( 6) Coast Gd _ '57.3 Tufts '46.6 ( 6) Amherst -— 40.7 Upsala .'51.5 (38) Kings PL _ M3.C Urslnus 28.0 ( 8) Wagner _ '20.4 Wesleyan _ *52.2 (23) Sw'rthmore 23.8 W.Maryland 37.1 I 3) T t M .._- '34.2 Westm'ster. 59.3 (16) Waynesb'g '43J Williams _ '50.1 ( 91 Vnion • • 41.4 ' Wore. Poly '54.5 (33) R. P. I '. 21.9 OTHER MIDWESTERN THURSDAY/ OCTOBER 27 TTouhssto'n '65.6 (28) E-Wallace. _ 39J . FRIDAY,' OCTOBER 28 Baker _i_ '19.8 ( OLBethel 19.8 CoIEmp'ria '46^ 124) Kan. Wesl'n 22.4 Mankato St. 40.6 (15) Carthage .•- '25.8 Mo. Vslley '52.8 (24) Wm. Jewell 28.S Ottawa •— '30.4 (26) Bethany, K _ 4.5 SW. Okla. _ 50.4 (18). SE. Okla. _ '32.2 Washburn _ 53.1 (21) S'westn.K. '32J SATURDAY, OCTOBEH 29 Akron 59.3 (13) Wooster _ M6.6 Anderson _ 25^ t 9) Defiance _ '16.8 Ashland _ '26.4 ( 0) Wilmington 26.1 Beloif -: 49.1' ( e] DePauw _ -42.8 Bluffton — '22.8 ( 8) Manchester 15.1 Butler '44.6 ( 3) Valparaiso _ 41.8 Centre 52.4 130) Hanover _ '22.4 Coe '58.0 (23) Knox 29.8 Cornell. la. 41.7 ( 7) Grtanell _ -35.1 Denlson _ T46.4 (II) Wittenberg 35.7 Dubuaut _ 'M.6 ( 2) Buena Vista 27.0 Evansville _ 53.5 (25) Indiana St. '28J Tindlay . '30.5 (19) N. Michigan 11.3 Ft.HaysSt, '49J ( 1) St..Benedict 49.1 Franklin — J0.4 I 2) Earlham _-'18.5 GAdolphus '52.3 ( 1) st Thomas 5!.S Hamilton _ 40.9 (31) Kenyon — '10.0 Heidelberg '39^ (23) ML Union - 36.4 Hillsdale _ '54.3 (18) Kalamazoo 3CJ Hiram "26 0 ( 4) Otterbeln 22.1 DL Normal «41.6 (16) Lewis 25.9 LldCentral '23.7 ( 6) Taylor : 17.9 la. Tchrs. '533 ( 7) Mom'gslda 46.7 J. CarroU _ 51.0 ( 9) Case 42.2 Luther '47.7 (22) August'na - 25.4 Marietta 8.4 ( 3) O North'n _ '5.9 McPherson '28:9 (23) Friend! 6.3 Mich. Morm 57i (IB) E. Illinois '39.4 Mich. Tech 32.5 ( 8) Moorhead '24.1 Mullkta. __ 43.6 ( 6} 111. Wejl'B '37.S Muskfag'm '60.4 (17) Capital 43.1 N,. Dakota .. 53.0 (16) N.D. State -37.0 NW. 1 Okla. „ 35.6 ( 7) Sterling — »28.4 OWeileyan. '41.5 (27) Sewanee _ 14.3 Omaha — '62.9 (38) N. Illinois - J4.8 Parsons 40.0 (11) Wartburg _ '29.4 Pittsb'g St. 83.7 (18) EmporlaSt. '36.1 RtAmbrose '48.6 ( 3) LaCroBseSt. 45.9 St. Joseph '49.6 (15) Ball St 34.4 St.'Olaf — '59.3 (44) Mpnmouth _ 15.5 Simpson „ '33.8 ( 9) Central, la. 25.0 S.D. State _ '58.7 (15) S. Dakota _ 44.0 SE.MQ. St. . 45.9 ( 6) Warrensb'f '40.3 Upper la _. 29.8 ( 9) la. Wesl'n ^- 21.3 Wabash -•• 50.9 (11) Carroll ^-_ '39.4 Wash'n.Mo '46.S (26) W k L 18.5 W, niinois -55.6 ( 4) S. Illinois •_ 51.8 W. Reserve 45.3 (27) Wayne U. _ '17.9 OTHER SOUTHERN , FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28 Citadel- 57.9 ( 31 Wofford _^. 55.1 Henderson _ 37.1 (23) Hendrix _ '14,3. Presbyt'r'n '53.7 ( 81 CaUwba — 45.S SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 Abil. Chris 66.6 ( 3).SW.Tex.St.''61.3 Ark. Tech '45.6 ( 4) Ark.'A4M _ 41.6 Appalach'n 54.9 (10) E. Carolina.-44J Austin i_ '52.8 (171 La.ColIege _ 36.0 Cal. Poly _ 58.0 (11) Midwest'n '46.8 CarNewman 35.1 (33) Georget'wn '2.1 Concord _ '38.6 ( 7) Potomac St. 31.7 Davidson _ 63.2 (20) Stetson — '42.9 Delta. St. _ *34.7 ( 3) Miss. Coll _ 31.7 E.Ky!sta(e '63.3 ( 4) Mor. Harvey 59.7 HamSydney'4B.l (27) Br'Kewater '21.2 How-Payne '59.6 ( 0) NWLouis'na 59.6 :Len. Rhyna 56.2 (12) Em'yH'nry '44.6 ' Little Rk. _ '50.8 (23) SouthernSt 27.8 Louisville - '71.7 (24) .WJJy.State 47.6 Maryville ^ '32.0 (16) Howard ^- '16.4 McMurry - '64.0 (20) T.. N.Mexico 43.6 McNeese '60.5 (19) Lamar T. 41.8 MemphisSt '69.5 (11) Ark. State ;. 58.2 Murray St. 56.9 (20) Morehead . -37.0 Kewberry '54.0 (12) Guilford — 41.9 Ouachita „ 19.6 ( 4) Conway St. '15,1 NELouis'na '46.8 (28) LiVgston _ 18J Salem 17.4 ( 5) Glenville ~ 12.1 HanoMac'n '39.4 (14) Dickinson - 25.7 SHoust'nSt "54^ ( 0) I. Texas St. 54.7 Shepherd _ '46.0 (42) Gallaudet —_ 4.1 SVestn. T. '33.1 I 3) Millsaps ^_ 30.0 SJJVustin '57.8 (13) Tex. A ft I _ 44.7 Sul Ross ... '27.0 ( 9) Tex. Luth'n 18.S Tenn. Tech 69.J (1!) E. TennS. '51.0 W. Carolina 45.8 ( 7) Elon '3B.7 \V. Liberty _41.2 (38) Fairmont _ 23.7 WV Wesl'n '13.7 (13) DavElklns _ 3.1 .Wm. Carey 54.2 (JO) Troy St. _ '34.4 OTHER FAR WESTERN SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 Adams St '34.9 ( 0) Highlands _ 54.5 Chico St. _ 44.8 (19) Nevada — 'Si.7 Col. Idaho - 40.8 ( 4) Pacific U. '36.5 Colo. Mines 37.9 (11) Colo. Stata '26.9 Colo West'n 42.6 (141 Colo. Coll. '28.1 Humboldt '34.8 (15) Sacramento 19.4 Idaho St. . '50.4 ( 1) Montana St. 49.0 SJ. State _ 49.1 (16) S.Diego St. '32.9 Utah State »69.7 ( 6) Fresno St. _ 63.3 STANDING OF LEADERS KATIOrUl 1 Oklahoma -—111.3 3 Michigan 109.5 3 Maryland 109.2 4 Mich. State —109.0 5 U. C. L. A 108.1 6 Texai AaM —107.1 7 Notre Daroa ^105.5 8 T. C. U. 104.7 9 So. Calif. 104.6 10 Navy . 104.S • Hem* Teem IAST 1 Navy 1 Pittsburgh 3 Army 4 Syracuse — 5. Prnn State 6 Holy CrOM 7 Colgate 8 Vale Boston Coll. Princeton X ReKn* 104.5 98.8 87.1 _97.0 80.9 87.0 _86.9 85.6 _ S3.2 79.5 Unavail. MIOWtST 1 Oklahoma 111.2 2 Michigan 109.5 3 Mich. State —los.o 4 Notre Dame 105.5 5 Ohio State 99.8 6 Miami, O. 97.1 7 Wisconsin 96.5 8 Iowa —_— 92.8 9 Colorado 91J 10 Purdue 90.8 iWe ' Copyright SOUTH 1 Maryland 109.2 2 Texas AtM 107.1 3 T. C, U 104.7 4 Auburn 103.7 5 Ga. Tech 102.5 6 Miami, Fl>. . 101.3 7 W. Virginia -100.9 8 S. M. U. 100.2 9 Baylor 100.1 10 Miss. State 93.7 1955 by Dunkel Spciti fAR WIST 1 U. C. L. A 108.1 2 So. Calif. 104.6 3 Washington 86.8 4 Stanford 91.0 5 Col. Pacific _ 87.Q 6'Oregon 86.3 7 Wyoming 85.0 8 Utah 84.1 9 San Jose St. _ 83.9 10 Oregon St. B2.4 Reieorch Service West Virginia And Oklahoma In Hot Fight For Offense Title By The Asiociated Press Using, different offensives, but getting maximum mileage out of-both, air-minded West' Virginia and ground- rushing Oklahoma apparently are on their way to one of college football's hottest races for total offense honors. National Collegiate AA Service Bureau figures showed today that West Virginia, ranked seventh n this week's Associated Press poll, leads in total offense with 2,134 yards for an average of 426.8. n passing the undefeated Mdun- aineers (M) head the list with a 607 completion percentage and a 178.4 yards a game average. •; Oklahoma, No. 2 in the national poll, has a total offense mark of 1.980 yards for a 396 a game average. The unbeaten Sooners (5-0) hold a big margin in the rushing department with 1,582 yards for a 316.4 average. West Virginia ranks poi 10th in the ground-gaining depart- ment while Oklahoma failed to en ter the top 10 in passing. Wisconsin and Illinois, the BIG Ten offense leaders, remain im mediately back of West Virgin! and Oklahoma in total offense Southern California and Navj moved up to fifth and sixth, re spectively (from 10th and ninth! while Boston College, Miami (Fla) Michigan State and Iowa follow. Wisconsin holds second spot ii the passing department with a' .59 mark while Army is second i rushing after gaining 394 yards las Saturday ugainst Columbia for i season's total of 1,460 and a 292j average. ••, West Virginia has outscored ev eryone else by a wide margin—37. lints a game to 32.G by Arm; and 31.8 by Oklahoma. By DICK DUNKEL DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.—(Spec- all—It was away back on Septem- er 26,1953, that Oklahoma'lost its ast football game—to Notre Dame, 8-21. The Sooners, now No. 1 in the 'ower Index parade, will be look- ng for their Jath straight win gainst Kansas State at Manhattan ext Saturday. And the past performance ratio ays that they should get it — with ase. Oklahoma has a rating of 11:2 compared to Kansas State's 5.7—a difference of virtually. 26 oints in the Sooners' favor. No. 2 Michigan, erstwhile nation- il leader, has appeared to be coast ng in its last two tests, against Northwestern and Minnesota. The Wolverines had better whiff the ixygen before meeting next Satur- lay's opponent, Iowa, although ilichigan still rates over the Hawk- eyes by 17 points. Others of the'top echelon will be deployed Saturday as follows: No. 3 Maryland, at home, rating J7 over South Carolina. No. 4 Michigan State, away, rat ng 12 over Wisconsin. No. 5.UCLA, at home, rating 32 aver California.. No. 6 Texas A t M, away, rating :3 over Arkansas. No. 7 Notre Dame, at home, rat ng 1 over Navy. The Power Index shows average difference in score relative to strength of opposition. Pairings for next week-end's games—with .rat ing differences in parentheses — are listed below. Of the 1,088 iames, omitting ties, that have ieen covered this season to date 76.4 per cent have been won-by the higher rating team. [)lson-Robinson Tiff Rescheduled CHICAGO (AT—The Internationa Boxing Club figures it will take iugar Ray Robinson, who suffered an 'ankle injury, a month to ge well and back in shape for his title fight against •middleweigh champion Bobo Olson. The. IBC postponed the Chicago Stadium fight scheduled for Nov. 4 ,o Dec. 9 because of Sugar Ray'i injury. . Robinson, the IBC said, sprainei tlis ankle while training Sunday and tried to work out yesterday aut couldn't because of the pain. LAUREL, Md. I/ft — Irish prida las affected the lineup of Laurel's nternational horse race Nov. 11. Tommy Gosling had been listed as jockey for Panaslipper, th» rish Derby winner and one of nine entered in the International. Pana' Upper is owned by the Irish government and will run in the color| if its president, Sean T. O'Keliy. Gosling was born in Scotland...The people of Ireland complaine/d o President O'Keliy they wanted- heir horse ridden by a son of the )ld sod. The word was passed to Trainer Paddy Prendergast. ,; 'He replaced Gosling with .T. Af. Burns, 20-year-old native of BeJ- ast. The field for the- fourth running of the mile and a half International is set except for one more entry from the U. S. Nine already entered are Panaslipper, Mahan and Picounda from France, Nucleus and Darius of England, Prefect of Canada, Atahirk of Germany, Duke's Lea and Traffic Judge of the U. S. . -; Word is being awaited from Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt on an invitation to race his Social Outcast as the third XI. S. entry. USE OUR TOY LAYAWAY PLAN The TOY SHOP Cor. N. Centre & Bedford Sti International Setup Changed II v Irish Pride 'Little Mo' Awarded §95,000 In Damages SAN DIEGO, Calif. — (INS) — Mrs. Maureen Connolly Brihker, the former "Little Mo" of tennis fame, has won $95,000 damages for the leg injury which cut off her championship career in its prime. A Superior Court jury in San Diego, Calif., awarded her the judgment yesterday against the pre-mixcd concrete company, which she had sued for $265,000. Buy your ROTO-HOE NOW I to prepare and plant your LAWN lt'« idea! for new lawni, er to dig up end rcmalct an old an*. Th* tharp tteih mix th* tori thoroughly—do moit of th* work for you. -At any tim* later you can get the n.w 20" ROTO-CUITER at- lathment for only $34.50 more —th* fineit rotary lawn mowir in America, trimi up to ^" from treet, ihruht, walli, fenc*l. Com* in today to io« ROTO- HOE, ROTO-CUTTER and other low coft iltachmtnti available. COSGROVE 252 N. CENTRE ST. DIAL PA 2-3040 > To the man who's thinking about buying a new truck: • •'. ^ maybe your* missing something^- 'And what you're missing is more, than "maybe," it's for sure—if you haven't yet visited your Dodge truck dealer. \ ^> Do you want to miss a rock-bottom price? •Perhaps you haven't realized that Dodge trucks actually cost 'less than you'd pay for corresponding models of most other makes. Surely you don't want to miss the dependability, the over-the-years economy for \yhichDodgeissowellknowr,. Do'you want• to miss power so high.it leads the field? Consider this: with engines of 169 to 175 horsepower, Dodge^oyerpowers every other leading make of truck in the low- and medium-tonnage fields. don't want to miss Dodge safety— which includes the biggest wrap-around windshield of any truck on. the road, the shortest turning radius. Or Dodge superior cab comfort ... Forward Look styling. ' In short, you can get a whale of a lot more truck for a good deal less money than you think! Stop in and see your Dodge truck - dealer right away—don't miss anything! J1Mt TRUCKS WITH THE FORWARD LOOK f 123 S. Liberty St. INC. Dodc* • Plymouth • Sales • Scrvjct Die! PA 2-0200

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