The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on May 4, 1997 · Page 7
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 7

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Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Sunday, May 4, 1997
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Page 7
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THE SAUNA JOURNAL SUNDAY, MAY 4, 1997 A7 ZAIRE Zaire peace talks remain uncertain National Nurses Week May 6-12, 1997 South African officials still confident rebel chief Kabila, President Mobutu will meet By TINA SUSMAN Till' Associated Press POINTE NOIRE, Congo — The rebel chief who has seized most of Zaire boarded a South African naval ship Saturday night for his first face-to-face talks with President Mobutu Sese Seko. But the president was still on shore. South African officials continued to express confidence that the peace talks between Mobutu and rebel leader Laurent Kabila would go forward. They just weren't sure when. Kabila was flown on board the ship late Saturday night, after standing up the president the day before and infuriating diplomats who have been try- ing for weeks to broker the talks. Kabila, dressed in a dark blue safari suit, smiling and relaxed, arrived on a helicopter with South African Deputy President Thabo Mbeki and was greeted by South African Defense Minister Joe Modise. Another helicopter followed Kabila, carrying another dozen officials in his entourage. The rebel leader did not speak to reporters. Mobutu was in Pointe Noire, but still was not aboard the ship Saturday night and officials indicated that it was likely the talks would not get under way until Sunday. "It's not a sporting event where things happen every couple of minutes," said South African Foreign Affairs ministry spokesman Pieter Swariepoel. "We're moving into a third day." Kabila refused to attend the talks at the last minute Friday, complaining of lax security and too much attention paid to the Mobutu entourage. South African officials conceded Saturday that security had been loose and that some of Mobutu's entourage had posed as Zairian media members to get aboard the SAS Outeniqua. "We let people on board yesterday who obviously weren't journalists but were posing as journalists," Swanepoel said. "Because they were accompanying President Mobutu, we let them on board." have the Couraee to Care Please Join The Kansas State Nurses Association District V In Celebrating National Nurses Week May 6-12 T BRITISH ELECTIONS Women gain in elections Number of women in Parliament doubles; 5 women in Cabinet By EDITH M. LEDERER The Associated Press LONDON— Ann. Margaret. Harriet. Clare. Marjorie. On and on the list went, 120 women's names in all. Britain's election was not just a victory for the opposition Labor Party but for British women, who nearly doubled their numbers in Parliament. Prime Minister Tony Blair has already named five women to Cabinet posts, including one of the toughest slots, Northern Ireland. "It is good news for democracy because women in the country will see women in Parliament," said Labor lawmaker Harriet Harman, who was appointed to the Cabinet on Saturday as head of social security. "It will drive to the forefront of the political HARMON agenda a whole range of issues, like child care, like opportunities for women at work, the balance between work and home," she said. Few doubt that the male clubbi- ness of the House of Commons will change. Political pundits were , speculating whether the shooting gallery would be turned into a day r care center. The barber shop is already being converted into a more sophisticated salon to attract women as well. Blair is already dealing with -family issues — like where his :'own family will live. • Blair spent his first night as prime minister Friday not in 10 Downing St. but in his spacious Victorian home in north London, with his wife, Cherie Booth, and their three young children. He is the first prime minister to have small children since Labor's Ramsay MacDonald in the 1920s .and the living quarters at 10 Downing St. — the prime minister's official residence — are small. After an inspection Friday, the Blairs said it was not really ; suitable for family living. They are considering living next door at 11 Downing St., usually the home of the chancellor of the exchequer, which has five bed- Tboms and three bathrooms. But ' no decision has been made. Gordon Brown, the new treasury chief, is a bachelor. Blair spent Saturday at Downing Street, meeting senior Labor 'figures and completing his 22; member Cabinet. Most senior positions went to people closely aligned with Blair's goal of a centrist "new" Labor Party. His senior appointments Saturday were Harman, George Robertson as defense secretary, Marjorie Mowlam as Northern Ireland secretary, Donald Dewar as Scottish secretary, Ron Davies as Welsh secretary, and Clare Short as secretary for international development. SPRING CELEBRATION ffV Friday, May 9,2-8pm f) * Saturday, May 10,10-3pm 802S.9th,Salina,KS (913)82&S827 Please stop by & see our new line, just in time for Mother's Day. We liave eveiyUiing you need to create a fresh look for IWff including antique funiituiv, pine furniture, wreatlis, primitive dolls & bunnies, gai'dening, countiy, and numerous liandmade Uxasures. 'lliia year J| , we liave a wonderful assortiuejit of baked goods to delight everyone's tusk', j ELEMENTS OF TIME Great Watches & FREE Gifts! FREE GIFT FREE GIFT WITH ANY ANNE KLEIN II WATCH PURCHASE Receive a set of three cosmetic bags that fit Inside each other to save space. WITH ANY FOSSIL WATCH PURCHASE This convenient tote bag Is yours and perfect , for summer outings. FREE GIFT FREE GIFT WITH ANY GUESS WATCH PURCHASE Receive a signature umbrella in blue and yellow. WITH ANY Liz CLAIBORNE WATCH PURCHASE Pack up and go with this essential garment bag. DOlaid's For Your Convenience We Accept Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, Carte Blanche, Diner's Club Or Your Dillard's Charge. INTEGRITY. . .QUALITY. . .VALUE. . .DISCOVER THE DIFFERENCEI SHOP TODAY NOON - 6 P.M.

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