The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan on September 26, 1939 · Page 7
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The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan · Page 7

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Ludington, Michigan
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Tuesday, September 26, 1939
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Page 7
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li 7UESDAY, SEPT. 26, 1939. THE DAILY NEWS—LUDINGTON, MICHIGAN. PAGE SEVE The palace of former Kaiser Hllhelm II at Potsdam, Oer- lany, had 600 rooms—and two athrooms. Sir Edwin Chadwick and Sir John Simon, both Englishmen, are regarded as the founders of modern public health practices. WELCOME MAX A. JENKS Pontiac Sales and Service Greetings to All of Our Friends and Welcome to This Harvest Festival. SPECIAL SALE on all •a* FLOUR and FEEDS During Festival Days. Scottville Grist Mill J. ALEINIK Telephone 110 B.Moores Purchase the Dairy Lunch Mr. and Mrs. Burton Moore have returned to Scottville from Reed City where they lived the past year. They have purchased the Dairy Lunch, located in the Robinson building, corner of Main and State streets, and recently owned by the Hillsamer Brothers of Brethren. Mr. and Mrs. A Hillsamer, who took over the interests of the company early in the month, found the work to strenuous and were obliged to give it up. They have enjoyed a splendid business and made many friends in Scottville who are sorry to have them leave. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are well- known to Scottville folks and have had much experience in this work so will be "able to carry on the business in a most efficient manner. Mrs. Mary Sims, 81, Honored on Sunday Honoring Mrs. Mary Sims, who celebrated her 81st birthday anniversary Sunday, Sept. 24, a special service was held at Grace Evangelical church, where she is a constant attendant whenever she is able. A favorite hymn, "When They Ring the Golden Bells for You and Me," was sung and Rev. E. F. Rhoades, pastor, spoke in appreciation of her life and her work. Sunday was also National Gold Star Mothers' day, a group of which Mrs. Sims is a member. A national program was given in their honor over the radio. Mrs. Sims is also the oldest member of the church. Four Marquette Inmates Caught After Wild Flight (Continued from Page 1) instruct guards not to hinder its passage through the prison gates. Guards stood by helplessly as the car sped away, afraid to open fire lest the convicts carry out their threat to kill their hostages. Five miles from the prison they released Deputy Warden Newcome with instructions to warn .pursuers that the other three would be killed if the 1 chase became close. A highway blockade was quickly set up, however, along the few roads leading from the heavily forested area surrounding; the prison, and state police followed the fleeing automobile. Pascoe leaped from the car as it swerved to avoid a barricade at an intersection near Menominee, 122 miles from the prison, and a few miles farther the speed of the car rolled it over as it tried to negotiate a curve. Warden Coon said* the four convicts were "very congenial" during the wild ride which at times reached a pace of 90 miles an hour. "But they meant business, all right," he added. "It is to the prison guards' credit," he said, "that there was much delay in supplying a car. And instead of a new car, the convicts were given an old sedan and the gasoline j gauge was short-circuited so j that it showed a full tank when actually it had only a gallon of gas." Suspecting such a ruse, the convicts stopped the car for gasoline a short distance away from the prison and released the deputy warden before continuing their flight. Stearns, third member of the quartet involved in the break, tried a sensational escape from the state prison of Southern Michigan at Jackson a year ago dressed as a guard. He was apprehended before he | could make good his escape, and later transferred to Marquette. Corner Stone for Hospital Laid Monday present Paulina Stearns hospital including a photo off Mrs. J. S. Stearns, for whom it was named; early and present-day photos of Mason county public buildings, and a copy of the annual summer edition of The News. Following tradition, a number of onlookers placed pennies in the box just before it was to toe sealed—for good luck, symbolic of the success with which they hope the building will meet. Rev. Erling Edwardsen, president of Mason County Ministerial association, closed the program with a prayer and benediction, following which the band played "The Star Spangled Banner." Finance drive to raise $30,000 to complete the building— largest drive in Mason county in over 25 years-^will start next week, officials explained, and will continue for a three-week period. Starting Monday, Oct. 2, It will be conducted among places of 'business next week, which will ibe followed by a house-to- house campaign throughout the county. Full details of the campafg It was announced, will be avail'- able later this week. .,; WE EXTEND A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL! TO THE EIGHTH Harvest Home Festival Come In and Get Acquainted with Our Experienced Mechanics. Scottville Auto Parts KENNETH HENTLEY LEONARD KINNEY 108 Nor.lhJVIain Street ••• Battery Service -" Tires New and Used Auto Parts. They always end up at the towns favorite meeting place ChristenseiTs Tavern Where you get a full glass of beer or a tempting sandwich. COME IN DURING Harvest Home Festival We Want You to Come and Enjoy SCOTTVILLE Home-Coming EIGHTH HARVEST HOME FESTIVAL September 28th and 29th We Are Always in the Market for GRAIN—BEANS POTATOES We Also Carry a Complete Line of Feeds, Seeds, Flour and Coal. BUY HERE, IT COSTS LESS. REMEMBER! We Ship Veal on Each Tuesday You Get the Highest Possible Market Price. The Mason County Co-Operative Inc. Phone 34. Scottville. "Yes Sir, It's Time to Close Up the - Desk and Go to the Harvest Home Festival in SCOTTVILLE THURSDAY AND FRIDAY We are glad to welcome you and if you need anything in our line we are glad to be of service. Scottville Lumber Co. Phone 70 LESLIE BRAGG Bids You a Sincere WELCOME To Scottville's 8th Annual Harvest Home Festival MOWS THE TIME to check your car for the coming cold weather.— Have it done now before it is too late—Heaters and other winter equipment for your car. LESLIE BRAGG SALES 'for Economical Transportation" I CHEVROLET SERVICE THE MARKETS (Additional Markets on Page 3) L,OC«.u mn.KK.fiTS Light red kidney beans ............ S2.75 Dark red kidney beans ............ $3.00 Dark cranberry beans ............ $2.50 Mght cranberry bean?. ............ 42.50 White pea beans ....-• ............ $2.00 Yelloweye beans .................. $2.75 Poultry Leghorn hens, 3 Ibs. and up ........ lie Heavy hens ......................... Mo Plymouth Uock springers, under 4 Ibs ....................... 17c Plymouth Rock springers, Colored springers .................. 15o 4 Ibs. and up ...................... 170 Grain ShelleJ com, cwt ................. $1.05 Rye, cwt ............................ 85c Oats, cwt ......................... $1.00 Wheat, cwt ................... . ____ $1.00 Produce Beet Hides 4 0 Detroit Produce (Quotations in Dollars and Cents) DETROIT, Mich., Sept. 26.— (IP)— (United States Department of Agrlcul- u;re.)—Grapes—Mich. Concords 4 qt. baskets, .14; 12 qt. baskets, .28. Apples—Mich, bushel baskets and eastern crates U. S. No. 1 mostly 2'/2 in. min., Delicious, 1.25; Jonathans, .75-1; Greenings, .75-1; Wealthys, .25-.50. Celery Mich, bunches dozens, me- cSixim size, .23-.2S; large, .35; small, .20. Onions—50 Ib. sacks U. S. No. 1: Mich. Yellows, medium size, .60-.65; few, .50: large size, .80-.85. Pears—Bu. baskets U. S. No. 1, 2 in. min., Mich Bartlctts, 1.40-.50; N. Y., 1.50-.75. Potatoes—100 Ib. sacks U. S. No. 1: Ida. Russets, 1.85-2.10; Mich. Round Whites, 1.20-1.40; Chippewas, 1.40-1.60^ Bliss Triumphs, 1.50-1.60; Ind. Bliss Triumphs, 2; Maine Chippewas, 1.75-1.85; N. D. Bliss Triumphs, few, 1.50. Detroit Livestock .. •' .". (Quotations in Dollars and Cents) ^DETROIT. Sept. 26.-^(/PY— Cattle—Re- (•eipts 700; market slow. Good to choice yrnrlmas, 9.75-11; fair to good yearlings, ff.50-9.50; good to choice heavy steers, 9.50-10.50; fair to Rood heavy steers, E.50-9.25: common butcher cattle, 5.506.50; canner and cutter cows, 4-5.50; best butcher and heavy bologna bxills, 7.2S-.75; milkers and springers, 50-75. . Calves—Receipts 600; market steady to 50 cents lower. Best calves, 13; fair to good, 11-13: seconds, 10-11; culls and common, 5-9.50. i' Sheep and lambs—Receipts 2,000; market steady. Best lambs, 9.50; heavy fit sheep, 2-.50; culls and common. Hogs—Receipts 1,200; market pros- fifcts 10 cents lower. Previous 7.85 for 200-220 Ib. hogs downward to 7.25-7.50 for roughs. Detroit Poultry _ (Quotations in Cents) DETROIT. Sept. 26.— (/?)— Poultry- Market weak. Hens, 5 Ibs. up, 17; under 5 Ibs., 16; lephorn hens. 3 Ibs. up. 13; cocks. 10; leghorn cocks. 8; Rock ."printers. 17; leghorn springers, 14; young hen turkeys, 10 Ibs. up, 20; young 6orn turkeys, 15 Ibs. up. 20; ducks, white, 5xlbs. up, 12; rabbits, 9. Detroit Dairy (Quotations In Cents) DETROIT. Sept. 26.— (IP)— Butter- Best creamery in tubs, 27-28. Eggs—Currr-nt receipts, 16 \< 2 ; dirties, 14; checks, 12^. Chicago Poultry (Quotations In Cents) CHICAGO. Sept. 26.— (IP)— Poultry- Receipts live, 41 trucks; market weak; hens, 4',' 2 Ibs. up, 16; under 4>/ 2 Ibs., 13\'s\ leghorn hens, 11; springs, '4 Ibs. up colored. 14; Plymouth Rock, 15; White Rock, 15; under 4 Ibs. Plymouth Rock, 15; White Rock, 15",^; other prices unchanged. Chicago Dairy (Quotations In Cents) . • '•.". CHICAGO, Sept. 26.—W)—Butter- Receipts 789,953; market steady; creamery 90 centralized carlots, 27-27','4; other prices unchanged. Eggs—Receipts 6,530; market steady; current receipts, 16'/2: other prices unchanged. IT'S HARVEST HOME FESTIVAL TIME AGAIN and We Welcome You TO SCOTTVILLE We want you to have a good time. SEE US If you need anything in lumber or roofing materials. Before you buy your winter coal supply SEE US FOR Miller Creek Coal KIEFER BROTHERS' LUMBER CO. PHONE 131 WELCOME to the HARVEST HOME FESTIVAL Take Home a Loaf of AUNT BETTY'S BREAD Every slice is delicious. RYE BREAD, PASTRY Kids—Be sure to save your bread wrappers. 10 gets you a FREE Show Ticket! ROGER'S BAKERY Scottville WELCOME FESTIVAL DAYS Make This Your HEADQUARTERS This Is Also Headquarters for OLIVER Farm Implements and REPAIR PARTS For All Makes of Farm Equipment. F. J. Reader & Son Scottville, Mich. WELCOME TO iSCOTTVILLE'S EIGHTH ANNUAL HARVEST HOME FESTIVAL "It's occasions such as this that make folks appreciate, more than ever, the convenience of their time and labor saving Electric Appliances." i. "Take an Electric Range for instance. It will help yon get meals over with in a hurry so you can get to town in good time and enjoy the festival. Then, too, if you'll just slip you 'dinner into your electric oven arid set the automatic timer before you leave home, you can have a fully cooked meal awaiting you when you return. There will be 110 more leaving the celebration, before you are ready, in order to have dinner or supper on time." "And when you are in Scottville, you will always find a hearty welcome awaiting you at our office. So why not drop in and inspect our display of Electric Ranges, Water Heaters, Refrigerators and other Electric Appliances that are so easy to own, so economical to operate-" Cook Electrically ELECTRIC COOKING COSTS LESS THAN HALF OF WHAT YOU PROBABLY NOW BELIEVE. WDOY KILOWATT Michigan Public Service Co.

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