Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland on October 19, 1955 · Page 15
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Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland · Page 15

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Wednesday, October 19, 1955
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PA-2.4600 for t WANT AD EVENING TIMES, CUMBERLAND, MD^ WEDNESDAY* OCTOBER 19, 195» FIFTEEN Go To DecisionUp To Members Of Cu'cuit _ Action Would •Result Only If Both Teams Finish Undefeated By GEORGE BOWEN BALTIMORE at. - There's a sneaky feeling around today thai if Maryland. and Duke continue undefeated through the season both will be made available,for bowls and Hie "idea" will', come" from other members of their Atlanlic Coast Conference. : Otherwise, the other six members will have to vote for either Maryland'or Duke to go to the Orange Bowl against the Big Seven champion and the reverberations could rock the new foundations of the conference. All Share In Receipts Aside from averting choosing up sides with the loser no doubt being offended, some of the other members are reported to be interested in having two .bowl representatives from a financial viewpoint. All members share in the receipts which from Iwo bowls would run at least $25,000, enough to get a couple of them out "of debt... One of them had such an idea last year when, the conference had 16 choose belween Maryland and Duke. But it was felt, then the records did not justify- such action. Each of the teams had.lost twice and tied once. Duke was chosen.' ' Change In Policy Needed According to the talk, undefeated records would make it defensible to let both go. Then the Orange Bowl would be allowed-lo .pick which one because the conference has a contract to supply a member to the Miami show. The olher team would be available to bids Irom the Sugar or Cotton bowls. Such action would . require a change in policy adopted when the conference was formed in 1953. This is that one team should, be selected for one of the,, bowls approved by the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. However, the only basis on which the selection is made is the general one of "most represcnlalive." Requirements that each member play at least six others, do, not .become oflcclive unlfl 1957. In the meantime, Maryland, at least, claims there is no champion. Bro tens' Center •f/ays 99 Games Without Relief t CLEVELAND W—Frank Gatski, 2W-pound center for the Cleveland Browns, goes after his 100th pro football game without relief next Sunday against the Green Bay Packers. The 33-year-old West Virginian, wilh the Browns since they were organized in 1946, says he has no thought of retiring for a long time to come. Galski inherited the regular center job when Mike Scarry retired in 1948 and has been the only man in the middle of the Browns' offense ever since. . Coach Paul Brown says Galski Is "far younger in body than most men of his jears. The outdoor life he leads in the off season has taken care of that." Gatski operates an archery supply store with his brother in Grant Town, W. Va., during the off sea- ton. He geU in a, lot of hunting and fishing, doing ail of his hunting with a bow and arrow. Throughout the. National Football League, Gatski is recognized as one of the best, centers in the business-strong, a fine blocker, and with a good sense of timing. George Welsh Leads Passers •--.. ly The AsiocioteJ Fr«i ••George Welsh's spectacular aerial display against Penn State has .vaulted the .Navy's poised passer from 14th to first place among.the nation's major ''college 'football gainers. • .' . . Despite the'-'damp .weather, the 164-pound Middle quarterback com- nle'ldd 15 of 20 passes for 285 yards 'and two touchdown's^ and addec Wee yards on the- ground for a -288-yard totalj'top.-individual feat of the year,'.and':Ihe.second best •passing show in -five""years, j" With his lotaV.pf.634.yards rush- !jng and passing: (minus one rush' *ing, ; .'635 passing); 'Welch, became jthe'fturtj! different' player lo head :the'offense"1ists in as. many weeks. ,Thet?other • TacVsetter's were Joe ClemtrifshTcxas, Claiide Benham, (Columbia* and. Aft Luppirio', Ari- LaitMght ... 8y The ' tanchttd Preii T ONDON—Gordon •< Wallace. Canada •'knocked-a" Rundy. Turpln,. Great Bit- llsln. A. (Llsht heavyweights). . _• . i IIOLYOKE, Mnsi.-Sammy Walker, -,157, 'Springfield. Mass., stopped Jesse ' Turner.-137Vi, St. Louis. 6. ' ) PHILADELPHIA - Charley Slnu.liler ,JJ1, WfSlileM. N. .!., knocked <*t Georse .; Lamalia. ly. Philadelphia, 5. ,'. ! Long Hall Hitter . * BALTIMORE - (NBA) - Geo- Jrge Bayer !». golf's longest hitter I —has a measured tip-yard drive-to I his credit, made at La« Vegas ) Nov., In 1953,;/ <\ • / •; • J Strictly Goalie i H/.NOVER, N, M— • iNEA) 'Clement •• Malta; is Dartmouth's foilie-ln soccer and lacrosse, AMONG TOP 150 Rctir Diff. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20 Climton _ 84,1 (13) 8. Carollni *70J. . FHIDAY, OCTOBER 31 . Chttt'n'gt- '77.S 1151 Abll. Chrlt. 82.7 Denver . — -77.6 (32) BrJf. Younf 45.8 Detroit — -78.1 ( 9) Okla. A*M _ 69,0 MIsj.Southn fl 1.4 (10) MemnhisSt *70.9 T.C.U. --- 105.0 { 4) Mlamt.Fla '101.0 U.C.I..A. _ '1M.2 (121 Iow« _ . !4.1 SATURDAY, "OCTOBER* "«. Army — . '95.3 (32) Columbia _ «.» Auburn _ " 103.2 (58) Furmin _ 45.2 'Boston Col. *34,7 (32) Mirquett* _ 629 Bowl. Gr'n '75.3 (19) Toledo „ _ 3SJ Brown -^ B 70.3.( 0) R. Ill a rid _ 70.3 Col. Pacific 86.3 ( 2) Stn Joie St -84.7 Colo. AAM *79.3 ( 9) Utih State _ 70.8 DelaWArt _ *72.3 (10) Connecticut 62.8 Duke __ -•' 102.1 111) Pittsburgh ± 91.4 Georgfi _ -92.7 ( 6) Tulane __ L 86.9 G«. Tech - '102.2 (321 Fla. StateV70.S Gettyjburi 70.5 (18) Muhlenb'g -52.4 ^Harvard ___ 72.B-1 7) Dartmouth '65.8 Holy Cross «84J {16)-Boiton U. _ 68.7 Houston U. -8B.5 ( 41 Texas Tech 84.8 Indiana _ 85.2 ( 4) N'wwtern "81,4 Kansas St. _ Bfi.7 (10) Iow» St. „ -77.1 Kent State -73.0 ( 6) Marshall _ 86.8 Kentucky _'*98.7 ( 3) Florida _ 93.8 L«. Tech _ 75.2 (18) MWLouis'na 57.1 Maryland _ 107.6 ( 9) Syracuse _ '99.1 Miami O. . '96.fi (24) Ohio U __ 72.9 Michigan - 121.8 (431 Minnesota '78.6 Mich. St. -111.6 126) Illinois __ 85.7 Mississippi '97.1 ( 2) Arkansas _ 95.3 Miss Slate 99.2 (23) Alabama _ *76.4 Missouri _ '78.1 ( 0) Nerasbka __ 77.8 Navy ____ 106 J {471 Ptnn ™ _ . "59.8 •N. Carolina 79 J (4) W'kcForejt "75.4 NotreDame 105J (15) Purdue -__ '90-8 Oklahoma • 108.2 (14) Colorado _ 84.5 .Oregon ____ • 85.3, (III Arizona _ -74J Oregon SL "B3.9 (19) Wash. State 65.2 Princeton _u 80.0 [ 9) Cornell _ *70.8 Rice _ — 94.5 ( 31 Texas _ 'Sl.» Rutgers — '72.4 ( 1) Lehigh . - . 71.7 So. Calif. - 105.1. (3!) California. '74.5 S.M U. .-..•_, 10 1.3 (28) Kansas _ '73.7 Tennesse*- "89.7 (20) Dayton -1_ 69.7 Texas AfcM 105.9 I 5) Baylor • — 100.8 T«. Wett'n 91.8 (22). Wichita __ -69.7 Tutsi'; _ •— '77.1-114J Cincinnati _ 63.4 Utah __ ' '88.7 . 8) Wyoming _ 80.4 Vanderbllt; '88.7 (26) Mid,; Tenn. 63.1 VJlluiova _ ••».!) t 0) N. a State _ 73.7 Vt. Tech _ -76.7 ( 4} Virginia _ 72.8 Washlngt'n *99.8 (12) Stanford _ 88.Q WT««5t. *74.4 (10) HardnSim'i 64.3 W. Virginia -98.3 ( 5) Penn Siatt 93 J Wm *M«ry '75.8 1 1) G. Wash'n _ 73.0 'Wisconsin "101.1 ( 6) Ohio Slate . S5.2 Xavler. O. "81.3 (14) Younctto'n 67.3 -Yit« •- __ •89.0 ( 4) Colgate . _ 84.7 OTHER EASTERN, raroAY. OCTOBER "21 Alfred _ _ 83.6 (SB) Ithara - ; 'J4.« Waynwb't _ 44.0 ( 3) St. Vineent '413 SATURDAY. OCTOBER « Albright -' "«J 01) r * M - S5JS AJ.C* _ -- 44.4 (22) Bridfeport '22.4 AmhcTEt _ Bloomib'i; Ctrntiie T Colby Cortfand _ DtlawaitSt Drexel —^. Grove City _ Hamilton _ r Ihdiana. Pa. Junfata Lafayette _ < LockHavcn ' Maine Mansfield _ ' Mlddiebury Millertv'It ' Woraviin _ • NHa'pshfre ' NHavenSt ' N'eastern _ • P.M.C. -_->.' .Rochctter ' St L*wr'c« ' Ship'nsb'K- ' Slip. Rock ' Thiel Trenton ' TufU ' Union . ' Upsala ' Unlnus Vermont _ ' WCh«terSt.' Westm'eter _ W. Reserve Woe. Poly ... '47.3 ( 1) Weslryin — «.5 '41.6 ( 9) King's . 32J '49.3 (10) Tempi* 36.8 36.8 ( 4) Bowdoln _ '33.2 '50.3 (M) Brockport _ 15.9 '42.7 laVLbwoln —i ».0 51.1 (14) LycomiRf '36.9 24.1 ( 5) Allegheny ' '16.1 '41.8 (12) Haverford - 29.6 38.3 (12) Clarion St. '26.0 46.0 (20) Dickinson '25.9 •88.5 ( 7) Bucknell _ 61.2 l *4.9 (40) Cheyney 4.8 11.2 (38) Bates '32.0 '24.7 I 8) Kutztown _ 16-7 2fl.5 ( 5) R.PJ. _^_ '24.6 '35.4 (15) Nat. Agglej'10.3. 58,0 (14) Leb. Valley '44.5 '70.2 (23) Brandels -. 46.9 '47,6 ( 8> NBHtainSt. 39.8 '58.4 { 7) Mass. U. _ 49.2 '51.8 (32) Wagner 19.2 '29.7 (10) Kings Pt. „ 19.8 '39.1 (3fii McMaster _ 1.0 '33.3 (24) Montclair __ 14.6 •44.4 ( 2) Calif. St __ 42.5 47.6 (27) W t J '19.0 '24.6 {,5) Wllkes J9.6.. '54.0 (10) Williams _ 43.8 '44.8 (.1) Hobart '.43.9 •50.8 (15) Hofstra . 35.6 34.2 (12) Stv'rthm'r* '22.6 •45.4 (13) Norwich 325' 53.0 (23) EStr'dsb'f '30.1 58.9 (12i Geneva . '45.1 44.6 (1«) Buffalo _ '29.0 58.9 (6) Coait G'd _ "52J. OTHER MIDWESTERN TR1DAY, OCTOBER' 21 . . ,' B*!cer 22.2 (20) Bethany, K. '2.1 Btthel _™ 19.8 <13> Friends . "6.4. ColEmp'ria '41.8 ( 7) Wm. Jewell 34 9 Man k a to St 41.8 (14) Bemldji St. '29.0 Mo. Valley 54.4 (20) KWOkJa _ *34J SE.Mo.St. "45.6 (12) SW.Mo.St. _ 34.0 Washburn -55.5 ( 5) Pittsb'g St. _ 50.B SATURDAY, OCTOBER aa Akron ._4_ '59.3 (13) Denison «J Anderson - r21.4 : (.-2) Manchester 19J Ashland _ '25.5 (19J O. Northern 7.0 Bluffton _ '25.1 ( 1) Wilmington 23.8 Bradlry _ '51.9 ( 2) Drake — 50.3 Buen» Virta 3S.6 ( 3) Parsons _ *32.3 Capital "41.7 (30J Kenyon 11.4 Carthage _ '26.6 (25) Central, Mo. 1-0 Central, Fa. '29.4 ( B) Dubuque _ 21.fi Cent Mich. M.B (25) DL Normal M2.1 Cent. Okla. 54.8 (26) EC.Ok!a. _ '28.1 C'eordiaJ«.--47.0 (10) Duluth 36.S Coe 58.8 (14) Cornell, la. *4SJ DePauw — 47.7 ( 9) Butler £_ '39.0 E. Illinois _ *37.7 ( 8) Indiana St 29.8 Findlay 30.2 (13) Defiance _ '17.0 Franklin _ '19.1 (18) Eureka 1J n.HavsSt. *49.0 (13) Emporia St. 36.0 Grtnnell 45.3 ( 6) Carleton _ '37.5 Heidelberg *5GJ (15) B-Wallact ^,41-9 Hillidale _ 58.8 (27) Hope »2fl.B IndCentral '28J (11) Hanover _ 116 !«. Tchrs. _ '54J (23) August'na _ 30.9 J. Carroll _ -53.0 (42) Zdlnboro _ 11.1 Kan Weil'n '29.7 ( 9) McPherson 20J Luther : 47,7 (24) U.Wejl'n . *21J Mich^-orm -57.fi { 6) S. Illinois — 31.7 Minikin"— '44.1 (9) Lake Forest 34.7 Mo. Mine*. 44.5 (10) KE.Mo.SL *3«.3 Morn'tslde 55.7 (m S. Dakota _ -13.7 Mt.'Unfon "41.7 (11) Wittenberg-31.1 MliiklnCm . 99.0 (11) Wooster —MS.O N, Dakota -51.3 (25) Moorliead . 25.» O. Wesleyan 44.0 (30) Oberlln 15.2 Omaha 63.0 (14) Sl-Ambios. '48.5 Otterbeln - •».« 117) Marietta 6 » Panhandle "43.9 (22) Ottawa : 22.1 Rose Poly 2.2 ( 1) III. Coll. M.O St. Joseph . 54.2 ( 5) Evansvllle MS.9 St. Olal 59.9 (3.1) Knox . '29.1 S.D. State . -58.0 (20) N.D. State _ 37.8 S'we«tern,K.'4S.3 (10) St. Benedict 36.0 SW. Okla. •H.DJUI HE. Okll. _ 45.0 Taylor -:I8,3 ( 0) Earlham — 18.1 Upper Ia.'_ «29.4 ( 0) Wartburg ^- 29.0 Valparaiso „ 39.6 ( 3) Ball St. __ »3<U Wabath — -50.9 (37) Sewanee — 14.J Wayne U. _ 33.0 (13) Case —_™ '19.6 W. Illinois _ 55.2 (30) H. Illinois - "25.Z WMIehlian -48.9 ( I) Wash'n. Mo. «.l Wheaton L- *44.8 ( 6) HI. Wesl'n _ 38.4. OTHER SOUTHERN FRIDAY.* OCTOBER 21. E.Ky.Stat* -64.1 (2SI Morehead . 3«.l Fairmont _ «23.6 { 8) S.ilem 17.5 Little Rfc; i. •ii.t (14) Ark. Tech . 41.8 Ouaehita _ 18.6 ( 2)'Hendrix _ -18.4 . . SATURDAY, OCTOBER 32 Bethany" „ «36.I ( 2) Hiram .—- 34.5 CirNew'an -34.7 (20) Tenn.Wesl'n 14.6 Catawba _ "43.8 ( 31 Eton 41.0 Centre _ -SUB (49) Georgetown -2.9 Citadel '58.0 ( 4) Presbyter'n 33.6 E. Carolina 49.T ( 3) E.Tenn. St. «46.4 E.TexaiSt. -59i (10) Austin 49.0 Em'y Henry 55.0 (10) Appalach'n '44.5 Clenvllle ^_ 17.9 ( 9) WVa Wesl'n '9.2 H'mS'dney -48.4 ( 71 W.Mary]and 39.1 Jax State _ '7l>.» (25) Aust. P«y. 45.9 Len. Rhyne 53.6 { 6)'W.Carolina ^'48.1 La. Coll. _ '37.8 (22) Tex. Lmh'n 18.2 McNeese _ 56.3 ( 6) NELouls'na -SO.! Millsaps _ '30.9 ( 0) Miss. Coll. _ 30.7 MorHarvey *58.0 (17) W.Va.Tech _ 41.1 Murray St. "56.3 ( 2) Florence __ 54.0 N.Tex^U - -71.7 (251 Midwest'n _ 47.1 Ozarks — "36.8 ( 5) Henderson _ 32.0 Rand Macon 40.7 (12) J. Hopkins -28.9 SHoust'nSt -52.0 ( 7) Lamsr T. _ 44.5 Shepherd - -46;4 (44) DavBklns . 2.7 SELouis'na *70.8 (21) Ark. State _ 49.6 SouthemSt '24.3 ( 6) Conway —. 18.6 SW. Tex. St. 60.8 f 2} S.F. Austin '58.3 Tampa ___ '67.5 150) Llv'ston 17.3 Tenn. Tech 70.8 (25) WJCy. St. . -45.8 Tex. AH _ -44.5 (17) Sul Boss _ 27.2 V.MJ. '59J ( 0) Davidson _ 59.1 .W i L -J8.0 ( 1) S'wesfn. T. a.i W. Liberty _ 43.7 ( 8) Concord ^_ 36.1 Wofford _ '55.5 (14) GuiHord _.. 41.3 OTHER FAR WESTERN FRIDAY. OCTOBER 21 Idaho St. _ 51.9 (13) Coll. Idaho . 39J S.T. Syt« . -47J (10) Humboldt _ 36.7 SATUHDAY. OCTOBER 22 Adams St. . 43.6 (19) KMMIlifry -2S.1 How. Payne 56.8 (10) E ,N.Mwdco 46.4 Colo. State '29.S ( 5) Colo. Coll. - 25.1 McMurry _ 63.1 ( 3) Cal. Poly . -60.4 Montana St. 47.7 ( 4) ColoWesfn '43.6 N-Mexico _ 55.8 ( 3) Montana ^ -50.4 N.M. AIM -11 1 (nrCorp.Chrisfl Uji NATIONAL 1 MlchtEan , .—if 1.6 3 Mich. SUle —1U.S 3 Oklahoma 108.2 4 Maryland 107.5 5 N*vy 106.5 6 U C LA 106.1 7 Te«» A t M—105.9 8 Notre Dame —105.5 B So. C*1U. 105.1 10 T.C.U. J05.0 • Horn* T«fi* EAST 1 Nary 2 Syracuia — 3 Army 4 Boston Coll. 5 Penn State 6 Pittsburgh 7 Yale STANDING OF LEADERS 106J 99.1 95.3 S Col Kit* B Holy Crow 10 Princeton 91.4 89.0 mi Mi 80.0 MIDWEST 1 Mtrhlgan __ : __ 121.8 2 Mich. State _ 111.6 . 3 Oklahoma . 108-2 _ 4 Notre Dame _ 105.5 5 Wisconsin 6 Miami. O 7 Ohio Stat 8 Colorado 9 Iowa Uixvelleble" 10 Purdua SOUTH 1 Mao-land _ 2 Texas AAM 3 T.C.U. 4 Auburn 5 Gt. Tech 6 Duke _ 7 S.M.U, 8 Miami Fit. _ 9 BayJor 10 Miss. State __ 1955. by Dunkel .107.6 —105.9 -103.0 -103.2 -102J -102.1 -101.5 _I01.0 —100.8 _ 99.! Sports PAR WIST 1 U.C.L.A. 106.2 2 So Calif. 105.1 3 Washington fra.8 4 '"'V 88.7 5 Stanford 58.0 6 Col. Pacific B6J 7 Oregon !_ 85.3 8 San Jose SU _ 84.7 9 Oregon St 83.9 10 Wyoming 80.4 Research Service Rog' Manges Top Choice In Stove Draft Roger Manges, undefeated pitch- ng star of the champion Sena- ors in the Dapper Dan Little League, was the No. 1 draft choice at he Hot Stove League's fall mcel- ng last night at Cily Hall. He venl to Rotary Club which finished last during the 1955 Hot Stove eason.. Seventy-five players were drafted, including five other Senators. Billy Colbert and Gary Mulligan vent to B'nai B'rith, Claude Com- r to Times-News and Richard 'eck and Michael Robertson to Optimist Club. The Rotary Club, Jaycecs and Exchange Club claimed ten players each while Times-News, B'nai B'rith, Lions Club, Optimist Club ind Kiwanis Club drafted nine boys apiece. The Cardinals and Giants saw nine, of their players move into asler company. The Phillies lost eight, .Yankees and Pirates, seven each; 'Br"aves and Senators, six each; Athletics, Dodger's, Red Sox and Tigers, five apiece, and Indians, three. . Hot Stove League managers at- ending the meeting were: Lonnie ackson Jr., Rotary Club; James Manges, Jaycees; Jim Wilson and 'elton, Exchange.. Club; Howard Northcraft and Tom Connelly, Times-News; Norman Sell, B'nai i'rith; John Daum, bions Club; Joe Wolfe, Optimist Club; Joe Galen and Wayne White, Kiwanis Club. Here is a list of players drafted at last night's session: • ROTARY CLUB—BoKcr Manses, Rich farsons, Jim Rice, AUao Tyler, Eddie ilclvin, Darrell- Mower, Mclvln. Nines, Lions Fear West Virginia Better Than Army Or Navy By TOiM STIMMEL MORGANTOWN, W. Va. (/P)—Football scouting re ports often reflect over-concern and false pessimism an sound like the scout had seen a bad dream .instead o . rank Brode, Gary McDonald and Jack Morris.- . '• JAYCEES~Bob Gaffncy, Allan 'Steven' Clarence Kcan, Ron C.ulbronson, son, .arence ca, , Mike Aaron, William Slier*. James Bitt- n*r, Frank Corachia, George Chamhas, Claude Di Gilarmo. EXCHANGE .CLUB—Carl PuHenbcrs. r, Evan Smith Jr., John Cain, Leathcr- ah, Fred Schlndler, A. Reynolds, Noran Wallace, Pali] Green,'F. Anicellatta, obert Houl. •'. :• ' .' •. TIMES-NEWS—Donald Nave. .Roner Growdcll,' Francis' Connelly, Steven pooler, Stanley Alt, : Billy DeArca'nselis, )avis Owens, Jim Washington; Claude B'NAI B'RITH—William Colbert, Gary Stephens, Gary Mulllsan, Billy Leyh, Bobby-.I4Rht; Jack Stonkon, Jim Van ilcklr,'John (loss, B. Htrsh. LIONS—Eddie Gaiis, Bobby Reed, Gar- and'Ataey. Tim-Barnes, Buddy Yaider. Ken Mlngler, Gary Georse, Gary Davis, •Bud" Galford. • ' • . ' OPTIMISTS—Richard Peck, Don Harden, Ken Davidson,,Ron Godlovc, Mike Robertson, Jack Murphy.-Lee Judy, Billy Cllne. Robert Slumbanih. KIWANIS-Mlkc Hadra. Mike Clark, Gary, Henry. Charles Abell, Steve Klavuhn, niisscll Griffey, Carl •. Lefeer, B. Brinkman, Jim. White. ' Seoul Had Right Dope On Sooner*. LAWRENCE,;} Kims. - (NEA) Wayne Rcplogle.scouted,Oklahoma : orKnnsas,-and,turned in his .report of the .Texas•gamer-'.' Instead of the'usual diagrams and personnel; notations, Rcplo- glc's report'Was a"hand drawn picture of ah Indian, one hand •alscd, saying ''How?'.' , "Thai means how you gonna t»at 'em," Mleplog\e said to his Klmsas associates, football game. Nevertheless it is interesting to note reports from the' bird dogs sent to sniff out the opponents >rior to the 22nd meeting between iVest Virginia and Penn State unir versities here this Saturday. West Virginia is the No. 8 team n the country in, this week's Associated Press ratings. Penn State is not in the top 20 teams. "Penn State has a very good football team, with good size, good speed and good passing," summar- zed line coach Russ Crane, assigned by WVU to scout the Nittan'y ,ions this season. "This should be West Virginia's toughest game so ir." Double-Header John O'Hara, emissary from University Park, returned to the Penn State campus with Ihe news that Saturday's game •- should be a 'double-header." "And when., you see West Virjinia, you'll know why," he- cau- ioned. "The second team-is just as good as the first." Tha't reference to the two-platoon system operated by WVU Head Coach Art Lewis had further meaning when'O'Hara added: "West Virginia may be bigger, stronger and faster than either Army or Navy." Penn State knows all about Army and Navy. The Lions were shelled 35-6 by the Army in their second game, and last Saturday dropped a 34-14; decision to Navy although they were the first to cross the Middies 1 . 1 goal this year. At West Virginia'-the awesome reports drew a quick retort from Lewis. > ' Needle Our Balloon "They're just. trying to needle our Balloon," he';snarled. ' West Virginia's balloon has risen ligh. in four games. The mighty Mountaineers erased four opponents without trying very-sincerely and in so doingtreated most of the lavbc in the'Southern Conference. It.began with a 33-12 shellacking of Richmond!"Wake .Forest was next and lost 46-0 in-.the Mpun- [aiheer'sj. best showing. .to date. Then came Virginia .Military, 4712, arid last'^weekend William and Mary-was a.39-13 victim. In the last game \YVU-led 32-0 at.half; time. . *' '.'.-'•' The trouble is. that most Moun- USE OUR UYAWAYPLAN C.r. N. ineer fanciers feel there still ha en no yardstick to measure We rginia's football power, and Le\ has reached down to the fifi am for mass substitutions i ost games. But those same people feel th rdstlck is coming Saturday. La ar.Dick Nicholson ran 40 yarc give WVU. a 19-14 victory, th ly time West Virginia has beaten enn State two years in a ro nee the football arguments bega 1904. Lions Far Ahead Over that span of lime, Pen ate has won 14, WVU 6, an ere was one tie. Penn Slale thus far this seasd s beaten Boston College 35-0 an rginia 26-7, while losing to Arm d lo Navy. West Virginia leads the natio total offense; passing offens d scoring; It really hasn't bee sled in any of its four games date, and has had.things muc own way in the second halve The Mountaineers have, gaine 16 yards for a tolal offens erage of 429 yards per gam hey also lead the Southern Con rence in rushing offense, rushln ifense and passing offense. urquoise Cut Lead f First-Place Pearls Turquoise reduced Pearls lea three games in the Gem Ladii iwling League by 'taking two ree from the pacesetters whi amonds and Sapphires were ais pping 2-1 decisions. V Lois Wilson paced .the score: Ih a 186-901 total for Turquois her team leaders were Theres lisal, Diamonds, 164-413:' . Ka eighty, Opals, 175-407; Polly M ay, Pearls, 143-405; -Theresa Ma howski, S a'p p h i r e s, 16J-40 sther Mason, Rubies, andings: w.i. - - arls ..... ;..!! 4 Opals 123-36 amondi rquolse 7 Rubles .... 7 Sapphires , rHOMELOANS-i Bui|d"well the financial .foundation of your home by'-' placing ' your'"Mortgage with, this Association; » • . .,' WESTERN .MARYLAND luirdlni A Loiini An'n. Vfc WS LITTLE SPORT RoutOfi Horse'Rims Wild, Leads Ground Gains PHILADELPHIA . IB - .Alan Amechc is making a runaway of :he ground gaining competition in the''National Football League. The former. Wisconsin slar, num- jr one draft.choice of Ihe Ballimore Colts, has gained 476 1 yards on 77 attempts for -an average of Howard Ferguson of Green Bay, is a distant second with 331 yards gained on 67 carries for a 4.9 average, Ameche, who-starred in the Big Ten as a. line cruncher, has lost none of his drive and power as a pro. He picked up 72 yards .last Sunday against the'Chicago Bears n a losing cause. Pittsburgh's Fran Hogel with 282 yards on 73 attempts and a 3.0 average ranks :hird among the ball carriers. In the passing department, "old" Otto Graham of the Cleveland Browns still shows the way. the NFL's second 1955 issue of the weekly statistics, shows Graham with 35 complelions of 57 passes 'or 531 yards, Ihree touchdowns and a 9.32 average. Philadelphia's Bobby Thomason moved into 'second place ahead of Washington's Eddie LeBaron. Thomason has compleled 44 of 78 for. 697. yards, five TDs and an average of 8.95. LeBaron is third with 30 for 66, 512 yards, four TDs and a 7.76 yard average. Other leaders: Billy Howlon, Green Bay, in pass- ng, 21 caught for 345 yards; Vic Janowicz, Washington, in scoring, our touchdowns, 10 ^conversions, two field goals for 40 points; Norman Van Brocklin, Los Angeles, in Hinting, a 45.1 average; Joe Heap, York Giants, in punt returns, a 9.5 average; Jerry. Norton, Philadelphia, in kickoff returns, a 47.3 average, and Willard Sherman, Los Angeles, in interceptions with seven. Vest Virginia Alumni Group Charters Bus For GW Game Potomac Chapter of the West Virginia University Uumni Association" is making arrangements to charter bus for members and other area Mountaineer fans to ttend the West-Virginia-George Washington University otball game at Griffith' Stadium, ashington, Friday, November 4. Present plans-provide for the us to leave the New • Century otel, Romney, at 3 p. m. with e return trip to. start shortly ter the end of the game. The tal cost of the trip, including Trio Knotted For Rec Lead The Clowns, Park Punks and Capital Bowling Alleys are tied for irst place in the Men's Division of the City Rec Touch Football League as a result of yesterday's ac- .ion. All have 5-2 records and the winner of tomorrow's game be- iM-een the Punks and Capital will battle the Clowns next week for the title. The Hurricanes tied the Clowns and two other teams for the lead by beating Post Playground, 24-6, and the Clowns, 7-6, in a replay of the last 40 seconds of a protested jame but. then were eliminated irom championship, consideration by the Clowns who copped the playoff game, 18-6. V.F.W. forfeited to the Clowns in a game .that also was scheduled yesterday. The Hurricanes tied up the race by winning over the Clowns in an extra period after George McGregor knotted the count at 6-all with a touchdown in the closing seconds of play. ( Touchdowns by McGregor, Mickey Clark and Bob Mattingly, however, enabled the Clowns to knock the Hurricanes out of the title running 1 in a playoff contest McGregor scored on an 18-yard pass from Clark. Clark tallied from the one and McGregor 'passed 1 4yards to Mattingly for the final six-pointer. Denmark registered the Hurricanes', touchdown in the final quarter. POST one 0-6 HURRICANES 0 0 11 12—24 Touchdo\vns scored by Graham (Post); PctUgrew 2, Harper, Keller (Hurricanes). CLOWNS fi U fi fi HURRICANES 0 0 0 S-6 . .Touchdowns scored by McGregor, Clark, Mattingly (Clowns); Denmark (Hurricanes). • GIVE ... to YOUR COMMUNITY CHEST If y«ur (•ntriliun'cn h« Ml been picked lip, ««ll M 1-JMO «nJ • w«rk« WM <«ll. . ' - Virginia Avenue ":' Lead Tie "^ :kets in the special West Virginia ection, will be slightly less than 0 a person. Officers of the District of Combia chapter of the Alumni As- ciation have issued ah invitation Potomac Chapter members and eir friends to attend, their pre- ame. cocktail party and buffet iner at the Congressional Hotel 5:30 p. m. The game will start 8:30. A post-game party is also 1 plan- id at the Congressional Hotel id if as many as SO area fans Turpin Quits After Beating LONDON — (INS) — Former world middleweight champion Randy Turpin of England quit the ring last night after he was blocked out in the fourth round by Gordon Wallace of Ontario : Canada. George Middleton, manager of the British Empire light-heavyweight titleholder, announced in [he dressing room after the bruising London fight: "Randy will take no more punches for me." "Fair enough," said Turpin, who ake reservations it is planned won the world middleweight crown poll the group to determine from Sugar Ray Robinson in Lon- many desire to attend the don July 10, 1951, and lost it twi st-game event. If the number large enough one bus will re- ain until.after the party, with" 0 one'else." months later to the same man in New York. "I will take them for e other starting back immediate- following the game for the con- nience of those desiring to re- rn home earlier. Final arrangements for the trip 11 be made at a meeting Wed- sday, October 26, at 8:30 p. m. the American Legion Home, omney. All reservalions must made by that time. Thomas Slokan, a-member of the ampshire Review staff at Rqm- y, has been appointed general airman o£ arrangements by ene Gunning, Cumberland, presi- nt of the chapter. Romney ea fans should contact him re- rding information ' and reserva- ms. Mrs. Donald J. Baker, of Moore- eld, Hardy-Grant county vice esident of the chapter, has arge of reservations in the two unties. Dr. Thomas L. Ansel, 31 North ain Street, Keyser, is serving as ineral county chairman, and can e contacted by calling Keyser 2102. Gunning and John L. (Jack) owler, AUegany-Garrelt county ce president, can be contacted Cumberland area fans for in- rmation, the former at The Eve- ng Times (PArkview 2-4600) and e latter at Allegany Inn, (PArk- ew 2-7810. Turpin said' he could • see some of Wallace's punches coming but couldn't move quickly enough to get away from them. "When that happens," Middleton commented "it is time to give up." The stunning defeat ended Tur pin's dream of a world light-heavyweight . championship fight with Archie Moore. Pete Wight, sophomore Yale cen- r, was undefeated as a freshman •slier last winter. He's 6 feet 1 nd 200 pounds. • ^%1- J fj E MOTORISTS' «* ^^ ™ FRIEND, Inc. 173 Baltimore Street BARGAINS FOR HUNTERS HUNTING $C CQ COATS 0.08 PANTS and S J OO BREECHES t.OO Virginia Avenue turned back Tohnson Heights, 24-0, yesterday it Penn Avenue Field, causing *p hree-way tie for first place in the Southern Division of the Grade Ichool Touch Football League. , Johnson Heights, Virginia Ave- • nue and Pehn Avenue head the ace with 6-2 records. > William Younger scored three 6f : he winners' touchdowns and pasS"' id 20 yards to George Williams for he other six-pointer. Younger 1 nared two passes by Williams for" 30 and 55-yard touchdown runs and-' ;printed 15 yards for the final" ;core. "'"' VIRGINIA AVENUE.. 0 U S &-»• 'OHNSON HEIGHTS.. 000 O-'O' Touchdowns scored by Williams, Younir ir 3 (Virginia Avenue). Outstanding Opportunity , H«r*'s your chant* to own your' own profitobl* business as V WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE; DEAtERI You'll reloil nationally', accepted, popular lines of out* sup-plies, homo appliances, bicycles, radios, TV, sporting goods, tools, «tc. Merchandise delivered by «ur own company operated delivery service front our newly located, Butler, Pennsylvania, Wholesale House. No retail experience necoi* t sary .... we train you. Minimum cash capital of $8,500 needed. See, write, or phone: D. W. BROWN WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY COMPANY BUTUR, PENNSYLVANIA PHONE: 72721 Don°Ciolir 470 W. tOWKY It. AKRON, OHIO have such fine taste and complete satisfaction been united into one whiskey CARSTAIRS CARSTA1RS-DISTILLING CO.. BALTIMORE, WO.. LOUISVILLE KY, BLENDED *H.ISKE.Y. 86 PROOF. 72* GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS IT'S BACK TO .. . but keep ffiem in Couch with local happenings with the TIMES-NEWS *j Wirhin rodius of iOO milts f»m Cumberland nTs'Ntwi .r Tim.i $1.25 per month b, . *^jSmJ«y Urn ..; J .50 per month kyi tares keyond MO miles — Phon. Circulation Depl. ! Enclosed you will find check for ^," please send the to" •NAME •STREET •CITY Cumberland News -Evening Times - Sunday Times .«f*»in«tloi>,'.PIMM Ciicn.ol.aw D«nrtmin», PA-2-4«0

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