Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland on October 19, 1955 · Page 1
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Cumberland Evening Times from Cumberland, Maryland · Page 1

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Wednesday, October 19, 1955
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Truck Kilh Five Siorr, Photos On Local l*age Th« W«ath«r Partly;- cloudy,, cool tonight, ' : ''Low ,30-38. Fair, warmer, to..morrow*. .•••''. ..- '-••• ;.. ' High,.'5S; low,- 43;.iioo>i, 53, FINAL .-' . ."River— 3 : 'ji.'Rain— '.05 'in. ....' '.'.""-"^ .'T. "V' •' '•'.'" •• T "'.' ; '"•• "••''•' •- • •-•.'. .-. -.. . .•': .'"-..' : £& ' "" • '• • ' ' ' ' ' "' . • Rel. humidity — 70 per cent. .^ • ,. ' ' ; • -' •- .'•'••• : ...... . ••...-:- . ' _i_^ . : L_i. VOL. LXXXVL— NO. 288 .*•««« »«. S. n ic+-» KWfcrt. CUMBERLAND, BIARYLAND, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19 1955 ' iauiiutiuul Hnii Staict 20 Pagci 6 CENTS Film Star Will Wed Again Actress Jane Withers, 29, and Kenneth Errair, 27,_member of. the'singing group "The Four Freshmen" look over their marriage license application. in Los Angeles. It will be a second marriage for former child star. • . . - . (AP Photofox) Margaret Will Dine With Church Prelate LONDON W—Princess Margaret dines tonight with the Archbishop of Canterbury, leading foe in the Church.of England of any plans she may have to marry divorced airman Peter Townscnd. The 25-year-old princess, her sister, Queen Elizabeth II, and other members of the Rdyal Family headed the guest list for Lambeth Pal- venerable •;• '., ' ~~~. ~ • Woman To Get Big Estate Of Former Mate ace. the Archbishop's brick residence across the Thames from Uic Houses of Parliament. Also invited were all the church bishops who along with the Royal Family were to attend the pre- dinncr dedication ot the palace chapel, damaged In the war andl now repaired. > j Townscnd wns not'on the list.: . The.'foremost .thought with all present was certain'to be the ro-' mance between Margaret and the; 40-year-old RAF group captain, a fighter, pilol hero in Ihe Battle of Britain and lather of two sons. With the mounting furore in press and public over whether Ihe; princess would flout laws ol the church by marrying a divorced man,' al! the dinner guests likely would observe discreet silence on the embarrassing subject. But this did not preclude entirely private lalks among the principals, cither before or alter the "dinner, on the topic of prime interest for most Britons. ' The 68-year-old archbishop. Dr. Geoffrey Fisher, is primate of all England. Both he and the Queen —who is constitutional head of the church—are pledged to protect its regulations and traditions, includ- NEW YORK (in- A woman whose husband vanished after two weeks of marriage 40 years ago now has earned to her astonishmenl that she probably will inherit $260,000 d; [torn his estate. . Her chance of doing so results irom the fact that a lawyer once :alsely lold her he had obtained a divorce for her. The woman, long since happily remarried, is Mrs. Myra Duck of 3rooklyn. She never heard of her firsl husband after he left her — until she learned thai she likely .will nhcrit more than, half his estate as the widosv's share under New York law. She was married .to. Helge Nelson in 1917. In the years afler he ing its ban on the remarriage of Then he retired, moved to Miami divorced persons whose ex-spouses ----•-•=--••• are still alive. Georgia Official Sees'Subversion In Race Disputes ATLANTA Of) — Georgia Ally. Gen. Eugene Cook charged today that /'subversion" is involved in the antisegregation crusade of the Nalional Assn. for Ihe Advance- granted mcnt -'of Colored People. He im- so 1 plied thai ho would seek to have ti the. organization outlawed in'the lory slate. - : . . . Iii a",presentation . of what he calico 1 "-"the ugly truth about the by NAACP," Cook declared that the sent organization is--"misnamed"' and thai'ils real .design is "to force upon 'the South the Communist- inspired doctrine of racial integration and amalgamation." eft her following their two-week marriage he built up a thriving auto parts business in Brooklyn. and died. Twenty years after Nelson deserted her, his .wife married Frank L. Duck. . . She told him of'her marriage and he suggested that she have a lawyer obtain a divorce. Soviet To Retaiui Traffic Controls, LONDON Ifl—U u s s i a, which Communist East Germany ivereignty Sept. 29,- will continue .0-control "for the presenl". mill traffic between.-.'.West Ger many and West Berlin. A note to this: effect, broadcasl the • Moscow radio,' has been to the Western Big Three; I replied to a 'U.S.-British-FrencI note of ..Oct. 3 warning Russia i would siill be held responsible for keeping isolated Berlin free open lo the West. Of f icer Ends Life After Killing Ma jor's Wif e d polic 'MIAMI! • .Fla, wU-Law' enforcement officers i today . marked "closed"' the" case of. a former Army first lieutenant who ended and .his illicit romance with a major's bu wife,by killing -the girl : 'and Ihcn II- .takinj' ; hls''own .lite.' >-.-;.. ' . ' George.-D; -Bryson'Jr.,• 32,.shot Sylvia. Dahl"-Hess,'-22, 'twice.' and . then 'ended' his life with a bullet ending in'tiic brain-at a.busy Intersection romance, . yesterday, according to.Sgl.'-'Flayd Alsbliry; of 1 the sheriff's office. .. „„.., • Alsbury said Bryson went AWOL just from'.his Afmy-' unit in tlormnhy " twb'.'years .ago ,and took Sylvia, who^had'.-'^^^!'!^''.^ 'orrinnncesaid, M»j(iiS while >'on- a'Motirlst f visa. Germahy^foilr months earlier, a'wild -ride .through the-.Black Forest' in a stolen jeep.' •: -'•••• ' He was caught.)'court-m'artialei " dismissed from the service J. brought Sylvia",to Miami >n< ived with her until about a-niontl ago, Alsbury-said;'-.,..'' ; : .V.;'. left a- hole,: : addressed -I on In ce, in. which '^ . hoi said; he .w "what was once a bcautlfu .- I'l'.iti '• hot,: sorry for what. • 1'n going' to 'do,": he wrote. ."There' .isl lio'other, way out." .•'.'• ."•.."• Sylvla.'was still married ;to th Army major in Germany,' Alsbur ilri,, and Bryson left a wife anc j" children,, now'; believed to Bethlehem, Pa,''- "''. '•'' to two Eisenhower Will Confer With Dulles President Getting Around In Wheel Chair At Hospital By MARVIN i. ARROWSMITH DENVER W-President Eisen- ower, getting around a bit in a vheel chair now, meets with Sec- elar'y of State Dulles today for jiscussion of. what the chief execu- iye has termed "the acid lest" f Soviet sincerity:' Dulles -flew 'in. from Washington ast night for another hospital con- erence with Eisenhower on United tales . preparations for the Big 'our f o reign ministers parley pening in Geneva Oct. 27. This is the secretary's second meeting with the • recuperaling 'resident in the last nine days on bat subject and other foreign pol- cy mailers. In. advance of Ihe meeling, the a.m. medical bulletin from Fitzimons Army Hospital*reported: "The President had an excellent ight's sleep of .nine hours.-. He woke feeling refreshed and in a ood mood. "His condition continues to pro- ;ress satisfactorily without com- ilications." Dulles Agrees With Ntaon At a. Washington news confer- nce yesterday, Dulles said he grccs with Vice President Nixon lat there is more "chance for prac- cal steps to ease East-West ten- ions at the Geneva conference ian at any other such meeting in ic last 10 years. Dulles-'is returning'to Washing-' m imme'diately after his' talk with Cisenh'ower to brief ; congressional eadcrs on Geneva strategy. Yesterday, for the first time, the 'resident was lifted from his bed nto a wheel chair and taken to an ipen terrace for 30 minutes of sun mtl fresh air. •Heretofore'he had;been either in jed or in a stationary chair for fis airings on the sun deck. The President's other activities •csterday included: 1. Issuance of a proclamation ^signaling Oct. 26 as a national lay of prayer! Eisenhower urged ill Americans to invoke divine ilcssings "upon the efforts of all men who strive for a just and asting peace." Congress, in a 1952 esolulion, provided for annual designation of a national day of irayer. Flood Areas To Get Aid 2. Qualification ot Pennsylvania ind Massachusetts regions newly lit by floods for federal aid. The 'resident also assured New Eng- and governors his administration s determined "to assist the state and people of the Northeast in developing adequate protections against future flood and hurricane osscs." After Seeing Sons 9 Bodies Wilson Hopeful Worker Layoffs Will Be Averted WASHINGTON (.fl-The Defense Department hopes normal turnover among its civilian workers wil lelp it meet a goal to shave 68,000 civilians from its payroll withpui resorting to layoffs. Secretary Charles E. Wilson tolc a news conference yesterday that ic counts on a cut in the civilian work force to play the major part n a drive .to save half a billion dollars and hold defense spending within 34'.i billions this year. Grain Trading Slow CHICAGO tin-'—-In'another slow market grains were sleady to weak it the opening on the Board of and Trade 'False Alarm' Shocks Cabbie •Anton J. Schuessler,.center, is aided to chair al county morgue in Chicago after viewing bodies of two sons, brutally slain jn wooded park near city;'.Another, boy was also murdered with them. Naked, mutilated bodies were found in ditch. (AP Phototox) Storms Pound Shipping Off British Coast Freighter Founders And U-Boat Is Torn Loose During Gales;LONDON U)—Gale, force winds ind rain lashed the North Sea to day, ripping a Dutch submarine [roin its moorings on Brilain's soulh coast and sinking a litlle Dutch freighter off Germany, Gusls up to 70 miles per hour were recorded along the Atlantic coasts of Britain. An inch and a half of rain fell, in .Ihe Scilly Isles during the night. The 200-ton Dutch coaster Con .ant foundered at dawn off the German island of Juist. Searchers reported little hope for her captain and a small child adrift in a life Mat. Three men and- a woman were picked out of another lifeboal by the German motorship Duessel dorf. Off the south coast port of Wey- moulh, the-Dutch submarine Tij- gerhaai dragged her moorings and went aground. Weymouth lifeboat and tug's slood by for two hours in heav> seas as the 50-man crew battled to get the submarine free. Shs was refloated .at high tide; and .laler made harbor safely. . Along the North Sea coast, little fishing .boats dashed for harbor and lifeboats were launched fron: three different ports to aid small craft in distress. BALTIMORE W—Driver Francis Hartlove brought his No. 6 bus to a quick stop the olhcr day afler female passenger cried: "Wait! Hold everything until I get niy clothes offf'"' Hartlove -spun -'around ,in his seat. The""woman',j fully clothed, filially manage'd" ttTg'et her bundle of laundry-through the rear door and off the vehicle. George Urges Peace Pledge By China Reds WASHINGTON «%-Sen; George (D-Ga) said today Ihe Unilec Slates should require a pledge by Red China agalnsl the use of force in Asia before agreeing to high- level discussion , ot major Far Eastern problems with the Communists. George, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, previously had put no specific conditions on his July 2-1 suggestion for an early, meeting between Sccre- ;ary of State Dulles and Foreign Minister Chou En-lai. He said then, during a radio-TV interview, thai such a high-level meeting should ie held within six months. He said.in a telephone-inlerview ie now supports Dulles' position that any near-summit meeting must await the conclusion of ambassadorial talks under way in Geneva. . Dulles told a news conference yesterday Communist China ha formally raised the question of a new ^high-level meeting with the United States. '' Pittsburgh Boy Killed By Train PITTSBURGH —(INS) —/Horn icide detectives said today that a B&O train struck .and "killed a North,Side boy whose decapitatet body was found :ben«alh the Niritl Street:bridge this morning. The victim was Idenlifed.as Dan iel PaltonV about. 15. Police, sail his family. 1 had reported him miss ing last night. At first detectives were unable to determine whether the boy had been .murdered or struck. by a'train. John Hodiak Dies Of Heart Attack HOLLYWOOD—(INS)—Film and stage star John Hodiak died of a heart atlack at his Hollywood home today.. The crag-jawed star had appear ed in such films as "Conquest.o Cochise," "Mission Over Korea,' "Ambush At Tomahawk Gap,' "Battle Zone,"- "Command Dcci sion," "Across the \Yide Mis souri" and many others. -Recently he had appeared in the stage hit "The Caine Mutiny Cour Martial" and in a number of tele vision plays. A native of Pittsburgh, Pa., he began his career as - a radio an nounccr and turned to screen acl ing in 1943. Police Say Fiend Slew Thfee Boys '.Ghastly Slaying In Chicago Spurs Hunt : For Gang Or Maniac CHICAGO UT—State, county and city police today pressed their 'idest investigation of ils kind in a quarter century as they sought 0 solve the ghastly, slaying .of hree young boys whose naked, nutilated bodies were found piled n a forest ditch. ' Authorities blamed the crime on either a madman or a gang of older youths. The boys—Robert • Peterson, 14 John Schuessler, 13;. and his brother Anton Jr. 11 — were strangled and beaten, apparently Sunday j| night, a few hours after they set out from their homes for a down- .own movie. Woods Scoured For Cjucs Their bodies, with legs intermingled, were discovered yesterday in Robinson Woods, just outside Chicago's northwest limits. A hundred law officers scoured :he woods .today for clues. Other police were tracing movements of the youngsters from the lime they left their, middle-class neighborhood on the Northwest Side to see the Walt Disney movie The African Lion" in the Loop Sunday afternoon. AD autopsy last night indicated .he boys had been dead 36 to 40 lours when their bodies were discovered but that they had not been molested sexually as first believed. However, Dr. Harry R. Hoffman, an associate of the Cook County Behavior Clinic, said: "The person who could commit such an act as :his one is one to whom the act itself.is.a gratification of. the sex urge.""' " .' ' '" '" Victor Livingston, a liquor sales man, saw the bodies when. he parked* his car in the .forest preserve to cat his lunch. The brulal murder brought heartbreak into the homes of Anton Schuessler, 41, a lailor, and Malcolm Peterson, 40, a carpenter. AH Clean-cut Youngsters . Anton . and John were the Schuessler's only children. Robert was one of four children. All three were clean-cut youngsters with close-cropped hair, who dressed neatly in jeans and jackets with emblems proclaiming thai they fere fans of the Chicago White Sox and the Chicago Cubs. Robert's mother Dorothy, 37, collapsed and was pul under a physician's care. Seven blocks away, Ihe other mother, Eleanor Schuessler, also 37, sobbed uncontrollably. "My life . ... my arms.. . - my ,egs . . . now gone," she cried. 3nce she started to rise from the couch as neighbors and a priest attempted to comfort her, screamIng: ". ... I want my boys! I want my boys!" Polish War Hero Dies In Red Jail LONDON «v-The Kremlin, breaking a decade of silence, has disclosed the death in a Soviet jail 01 Gen. Leopold Okulicki v a top commander^ in (he Polish wartime resistance 'against the Nazis. Polish, exile, sources said today the Soviet Red Cross last Friday notified the general's widow,"who lives in London, that her husband died of natural causes in a Moscow jail on Christmas Eve, 1946. U. S. Asks Conference . UNITED NATIONS,' N. Y-(INS) —The U. S. invited 84 governments today to-participate in a special U. N. conference : for drafting (he final statute of the projected global aloms-for-peace agency. First Lady Happy '.. Mrs. Dwight Eisenhower, 'in high spirits, is shown'at style show in Officers' Club at 'Denver hospital, her first public 'appearance since her husband was stricken. (AP Pholotax) Scores Seized In Dragnet As Dope Peddlers Philadelphia Police Aid U.-S. Agents In Nabbing 100 Persons PHILADELPHIA 'UV-A massed orce of 250 Philadelphia police nen, backed by agents of, the r ederal Bureau of Investigation and stale law enforcemenl officers oday staged a series of raids^ tha irought inlo their dragnet 100' per ions accused of using, selling'or jlherwise dealing in narcotics.' Six of those seized and charged vere women. Twenty other • per oils were held for questioning am lirther investigation. The raids — extending to Hor ham, Pa., where one suspected lope violator now lives—were or ganized weeks in advance and car ied out in the early morning hours oday with clockwork precision. The raider parties steered cl< 'f City Hall lest word get. arounc own (hat some unusual police ac ivity was. afoot. The policemen met in small groups at pre arranged points. They carried more (ban 200 war ants issued by Magistrate Frank V. McBridge, plus 37 others issued iy.federal authorities.. As the raids were disclosed. Dist Uty. Samuel Dash said "we're ou o tear this social cancer out o 'hiladelphia and.we expect to gi nto court with an airtight case in every warrant." TI-II man IVI Is Oh' 'Scolding' Byrnes ' " Secretary Ofi i By WILLIAM THEIS .. :WASHINGTON", (INS).— Former who President Harry. S. ; Truman disclosed today he scolded 1 . Secretary ot State Janics F.•': Byrnes in 1945 volume because "he ^camclo think that by. his 1 judgment was better'than the President's.".' ,'• ,': ''•.'•.:'-'••-'."--.•, . : " .He told ; of. lecturing : ,Byrnes /erbally and by letter for.his hc : hayior ' in ; tilling ' to -report, adc- quateiy';to Him; 6m the December 1045 .foreign"ministers conference of, In MoscpW.'--;.'';;';':;''-'.; ;..,'-•"-'•: : ">' Truman'•'•described, his Cabinet be troubles with Byrnes,'Secretary of Commerce Henry' A,' Wallace and Intcrior'Secretary Harold L. Ickcs, is. now Jcad. ^ ; ;-;?;-;-U His .rccollcctjons -'were, reported in the final installmeht of.-the'.first ,.bf; his -memoirs, '. published _,. Lifc';MagaJine.'.'.. ' : v'.-:.v v -'. .'• Thc'formcr President' said that y/hc'n he, fifed Wallace,, the,• Cabi- net'officer V.was.-.so', nice'about; it I ;»lmbst hacked 'out/- V He .aiskcd for»,Wall«co's-;rcslghationybecaus(! _. lie • felt . the; secretary's .criticism to of, foreign'policy, was ."hitting 'at the President,;" -. ; ( ...... . ( . •Truman''"wrote •lh'at'"'hc sllll thinks Ickcs was "mistaken"' In Senate testimony (gainst Edwin the W Paulcy, California oilman whom Ihe President': had. nominated • to je Undcr-sccrclary. of 'the. Navy. His nomination slymicd by Ickes' testimony, Paulcy finally .'asked his that the appointment be withdrawn. . - • in Truman, defended Pauley, it Ickcs resigned in what thir.retlral President . now terms a "not courteous" idler, Ickcs offered •- remain IB. his Job" an; extra six ,,_cks, but Mr. Trutnnn'made the resignation effective'the'next day. ;.ln-..hls latest, artltctc. 'the, Missouri" Democr'at s»ld ? that ; ricsfiitc " groat evenls. of; his first. four months in office,."he did hot.feel he was'.'really President in his "own right" ''until''.Sept. 6, 1945 That was. the dale he submitted 2l-polnt "Fair Deal" domestic program to "Congress. .. He recommended in the article thai .when U\e- p Vice-president .be conies President, the 'office be'till cd by election. He said he though presidential, electors would "prob ably" do'-V better;.'Joli;,of It"- th«n the;IIou»o'of Hcprcsentntivcs. ; Truman wrote that Byrnes h been given "unprecedented free dom of .action" as war mobilize! (Continued.on Page, 2, .Col.,5. clear a PP Russia Seen AgreeingTo [ke Proposal Soviet Scientists Know Consequences Of Nuclear Warfare '. POINT CLEAR, Ala'. Ifl-Harold b Stassen hinted broadly last night that Russia's leaders may accept President Eisenhower's arms inspection plan because.Red scientists are telling them Ihe ruth about the terrible, destruction hat would go with an atomic war. The President's special assistant on. disarmament told reporters he hinks .the odds are .in favor'of an eventual agreement with Ihe.Rus- sians! -And he- : added "there ;.'could >e some developments" - in .this ield at the foreign ministers'meet- rig in Geneva later this month. /'Their scientisls are Idling the Communist leaders the same thing Our scientisls are telling us — thai :he alternative to peace is -the jireat of atomic destruction," he said. Gives Views To Press . When the Russians achieve" a depth of understanding of the aw- alternatives to peace, then "we can begin working out the hard issues," he said. : Slassen gave his views lor're- jorters after telling the 21st annual Southern Governors Conference that, if Russia accepts the President's inspection plan, then .the world will have time in which to 'ind a means of controlling, atomic materials. The Eisenhower plan calls for an exchange of military information with Russia and mu- :ual aerial inspection. The Stassen" speech pushed aside the discussion..of politics by gov: ernnors who were^displaying a marked lack of enthusiasm—at least" for the time ( being—for." a suggested Dixie coalition aimed at wielding a balance of power at .the Dembcralic national convention, . t Johnson Behind Move .(The New York Times and the Baltimore Sun have reported that Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas, Senate majority leader, was behind a move to organize a coalition which would bring about an "open" convention with a moderate platform acceptable to the conservative South.) The governors who discussed the coalition idea said no one had iroached them with any proposal to join in such a movement. Ffdrriin.au Plans Series Of Talks In Fund Raising .WASHINGTON (fl—The Demo :ratic National Committee an nounced today a new series o und-raising 'dinners and party gatherings, with Gov. Averell Har •iman of New. York listed for fou ipeaking appearances in the North i-est. Harriman, one of three Demo crats, most prominently mentionei or their party's presidential nom nation next year, will speak in Seattle, Wash.,. Dec. 21; Oregon City, Ore., Dec. 22; and.Lewislon daho, Dec. 23..He also will appea at a-luncheon Dec. r 22'.in 'Eugene Ore., and attend a University o Oregon convocation there the sami dayv-;' .-..•:-. ;'. : .. .. ,;..""-, Ohio Turnpike Profit Shown COLUMBUS. Ohio tf>— The Ohio Turnpike is expected to .' show . a profit of about 15 million dollars next year, the Turnpike Commission estimates. The commission yesterday approved a preliminary operating budget for 1956. Revenues are anticipated at close to 18'A million dollars, while operating expenses come to slightly more than three millions. Commission Chairman James W. Shocknessy predicted the success of the new turnpike which opened Oct. i. Missing Allocma Girl Found Dead In Cleveland CLEVELAND—(iNsi—The body of an 18-y'ear-old girl found dead in Brookside Park in Cleveland 11 days ago was definitely identified today as (hat of a missing Altoona, . Pa., girl, Gloria Ferry. Cleveland Homicide Capl. David E. Kerr said a first-degree murder warrant is being issued for Louis Statler, 67-year-old former . Altoona street cleaner and carnival wrestler. '•..•; Atoitiic Scientists Discover New Particle, See Gate Open By RENNIE TAYLOR AP Science Reporter ' BERKELEY,'- Calif, science look another big slop forward today with Ihe. announcement world ot the discovery of a particle which Irisl annihilates the basic'unit of all exciting natter. . . >,'..' ' The'discovery was, made in ex perimcnts, utilizing the, University new ol California's biggest atom smash- er, the bcvatroh. It was announced jointly .last night, by: Prof. Ernest Lawrence, 0. Lawrence, fumed nuclear scientist; arid, the Atomic Ecncrgy, Com- theory mission, 'which' financed the 0!4- million-dollar machine. The new particle, sought for a generation..by researchers, is the anliproton. Although it is a powerful annihilator of • matter, il con(if)—Atomic stitutes no threat as a super-weapon, no new hazard to• the Instead^ It opens'up the .way]for ..ceiling new discoveries about the nature of matter. Conceivably. some of these may lead to great practical achievements of the future. • • • • . ;.".'!. . Its immediate value, said-Prof. Is thai" if'clears; up' some'of'the/uncertainties In'the theory'.of; nuclear structure; 1 .'."In ' this'respect, he'added, it iJ'cohv parable .•toithe.illllng'ln of, a'key word Iii a cross-word puzzle —tit permits the operator to go Ahead. - "•• '• / ' •' ;> ;•'•.•• !"• ":*.'. ' 'I

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