The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan on September 18, 1939 · Page 4
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan · Page 4

Publication:
Location:
Ludington, Michigan
Issue Date:
Monday, September 18, 1939
Page:
Page 4
Start Free Trial
Cancel

; PAGE FOUR THE DAILY NEWS—LUDINGTON, MICHIGAN, MONDAY, SEPT. 18,1939. THE LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS * • .: Trademark Registered U. ft. Patent Office wtih which is consolidated the Mason County Enterprise of Jscottvllle, Mich. Pnbllihed even evening, save Sunday, at The Dally News Building, Rath Ave. at Court St., Lndlngton, Mich. Entered as second class matter at post office, LndlDfton, Mich., under act of March 3, 1897. The Associated Press Is exclusively entitled to the use for republication of all i itWI dispatches credited to it or not otherwise credited in this paper and also the . local news published therein. All right for republication of special dispatches and v local news items herein are also reserved. MEMBER OF Associated Press Audit Bureau of Circulation Inland Daily Press Association ; 'WE TOLD YOU SO' Last week the nation, or at least nearly all of it, swel- :teml in I lie .second worst heat wave of the summer. Com- 'irig in the middle of September, it. was unusual, both in v height and in length. ; It is not out of the ordinary to have a hot day or so in September or even Ofober. Rut to have a near-freezing Sunday and Monday of a week ago followed by five of the 'hottest days of the entire summer is something really to write home about. Temperatures of Iflfl and 10."> were recorded consistently in many sections of the nation, and particularly in those sections that supply this region with hundreds of vaca- tionists during summer months. From Kansas City. St. Ljo'uis, Little Rock, etc., came steaming reports of readings ojrer the 100-mark. ; "It is so hot,'' wrote one friend, "that my fountain pen has doubled over with the heat and I am finishing this with pencil. Why I am writing at all in such a swelter is more than I know." The degree of warmth was perhaps slightly exaggerated, at least, as it jwtained to the fountain pen. But we got the idea—ami were glad we were in Ludington. [ . Picking up an official weather bureau report, we noted tlie following from Michigan: Monroe, 100; Flint, 97 1 /.; Hetroit, 9G: Ann Arbor, 92; Grand Rapids, 92; Benton Harbor, SO; LUDINGTON, 7S. '..AS long ; as we are bragging, we might as we'll add that that reverse will be true when the thermometers go tumbling down beyond the freezing point and on past the zero mark. We'll still be in the temperate region, 10 or 15 degrees lower in summer and 10 or 15 degrees higher in winter—thanks of course to Lake Michigan. We are pointing it out here again only because last week's .unusual weather so ably backed up our contention. We warned summer residents on Labor day not to leave— that our finest weather was still ahead. But it seems they felt they had to send their kids to school. Despite our warning, they left, which is why we are now gloating over last week's temperature situation. If they wish to return, it will be fine wilii us—especially if they bring a few factories with them. We have the right place to live, they have a few factories we could use. We ought jto get together. FOR AND RELEASED BY CENTRAL PRESS ASSOCIATION by OPEN ARNOLD The trouble with a fair is that it costs a lot of money to operate the kind of a fair people want to see. But people haven't the money to pay the pi-ices that it takes to put on that kind of a fair. As it is, they complain about the [pi-ices; if the overhead were chopped, they would complain | . about the fair. So round and round it goes. CHAPTER THIRTY-THREB "I'M GLAD I took you up on your proposition to come out here Lorena, for two main reasons, Shot Rogers was saying. "First is I get a chance to keep company with you a lot, without anybody butting in. Second is, I was beginning to feel like there really was spies at Brazee's home, and this way we can sort of test out and see." "Shot, I know there are spies! I'm sure of it!" "Who do you know? How?" "I mean—in my heart. I just know." "Um. So do I, I guess." "Do you ? Whom do you suspect, Shot?" Lorena looked at him in deadly earnest. "Never mind, yet. If 1 told you, you'd likely get mad, or feel bad. And I don't want to hurt you. Any. way, I might be wrong." "I do believe we are thinking the same thing, Shot." "Maybe so. Anyhow, it's good light now. Let's crawl to the edge yonder and look down. Now don't stand up, and crawl very slowly, so your motions won't attract attention. You got any jewelry—anything shiny on, that might catch a sun glint?" She left ner wrist watch In the pack, hic'den among some rocks and shrubs. There was a gemmed ring which ;he took off, too, and a shiny buckle. Then they moved with stealthy caution to the edpe of their high promontory. Shot was holding the field glasses and he hunched against a stone to steady himself in the breeze while he peered Intently down. "These are good glasses." he declared. "I can see plenty of stock down there. Some that I can't see with naked eyes. . . . And Lorena, ! ran see the Ghost river forks Main. The three forks come together within a quarter-mile of ;ach other, as I told you. See down there?" He passed the glasses to her. "See, the east fork is dry." She verified what he had told her. The glasses could follow the main river bed intermittently for two miles, and each of the three branches for a little way. Two branches had water; silvery, mirror-like water. The other wa.: dry. Mountains reared their heads obtrusively around them, and Shot pointed out several passes* nearer the river level whence cows had been driven. One pass led tc the Hump pasturage, over beyond a looming hill. It was there that Escobar had made two or three successful sallies already, Shot said. "It's like an eagle's aerie up here,". Lorena__declared. "There's something BO satisfactory and in- spiring abqut being on a height, isn't there?" "Yup. Me, I'd often figured some day to build me a house on a hill. A ranch house. I'd feel important in it, if I could look out my front door away down at a lot of territory." "Yes," Lorena agreed. "You slip back to the packs now and lie down on them and rest, Lorena. Shade your eyes and sleep. I'll stand guard. I'll call you if I need anything." "I'm not sleepy." "Go on and try it! you had a hard walk and no sleep." Contrary to her statement, she fell asleep at once when she had pillowed her head on the pack there among the rocks. Sho really was fatigued. Shot crept back once and looked down at her, then went back to his outpost. He was fidgeting a little because of the Inactive • duty he had. He liked to be up and doing things. He'd rather engage Mr. Escobar in a gun duel than just sit here and try to spy on him. But then he had tried the other with no luck. He'd wait. Lorena awoke at a quarter of one. She was surprised and apologetic for sleeping the six long hours, even though she felt infinitely better. He smiled fondly at her and told her she would make a good pioneer. She proved she was modern, however, by rummaging in her own pack for a compact and comb and "touching up" herself then and there. When she was done Shot told her she looked perfect, and he wasn't exaggerating much if any. She did look adorable; fresh and youthful and clean. She gazed over at him with a what-now expression, ready for anything the afternoon might bring. "Not a daggone thing's happened, " he declared. "You can come and be sentry for a while, though, while I stretch out." He crawled to change places with ler. then he Immediately crawled back. "First call to lunch," said he, smiling. "Also last call. Swallow :his sandwich, miss, and don't let me hear you complain. And there's an apple for you." They hunched nAr each other In some luxurious buck brush that grew on the promontory, eating and talking like college students might hive done. The stern man- ook tha"t Shot Rogers could show at times wa? completely missing now. "How old are you, Shot?" she suddenly asked him. "Sixteen." "No Really." ! " So this year, prices being what they were, everybody came for one night only—to win a car and incidentally to see the fair. The key to financial success, it seems, will involve about the same amount of fair, with more cars added. "Man is the only animal who reasons." HE tli inks. That's what And truth is. always the first casualty of any war. DO OUR BODIES CHANGE? IN THE NEWS 20 YEARS AGO Howard Hoffman and Hovey j Hagerman enjoyed a five-day j camping trip in the Udell hills i near Little Manistee river. ' By LOGAN CLENDENING, M. D. "EVERY PART of the body is completely changed every seven years." : ; That was one of the basic principles taught in the physiology of my high school days. * A modern psychologist, my colleague, Dr. Wiggam, tags this in replying to the question, "Do psychologists get along happily with their wives?" by saying that he and Dr. Clendening will answer questions of general interest only, and then only through his column. Mrs. Wiggam have lived very happily together for 87 years. When he teases her for being contented with the same man so long, she replies, "But you are not the game man you were when I married you." More a Development , I suppose only partly. I think Dr. Wiggam would admit that while psychically he has changed, it has been more a development of traits and qualities that were already present than a replacement. All the c$)U of his higher nervous system . »re Btill exactly intact as they were ' it the age of 21. His synapses are thai mm«. Perhaps he has a few Wtatt, or a few thousand more; he II » clevw man and entitled to tba imny, Of course, chemically he is very "r*nt. Tnere U probably not i ' OJ9 In him tha particle w* *neotaitor a mystery of on* of Mi nerv functions exactly the stand vrblc There is no authority, I think, for utting the period of our complete hemical change at seven years. In the case of certain chemical arts of our body, however, we are old on good authority that there is , complete replacement every six 'ears. These are the minerals, par- icularly calcium. "All of our calcium," according o Drs. C. C. and S. M. Furnas, (in Man, Bread and Destiny) "is com- iletely replaced about every six 'ears, and the only way to maintain he balance in the body is to take in a sufficient quantity in the food. If here is insufficient intake, the body tries to make adjustment but is never completely successful. It goes on excreting calcium, taking it from the bones and teeth." Fleeting and transitory as may »e its habitation in your body dur- ng life, your chemical preservation on this earth depends on the calcium in your body at death. It alone survives "the drums and tram- plings" of the centuries. The chalk cliffs of Dover, which symbolize England itself to the British heart, are made up ef the calcium compounds of the mollusk shells and urchin spines that were dropped to the ocean bed a hundred million years ago. Large animal bones and teeth have remained in protected places almost intact for millions of years. All we know of the human race's first million years on earth is the calcium-made bones and teeth that once were part of a man, a few stone chips and calcium animal bone fish hooks. EDITOR'S NOTE: Dr. Clendentar hu •tven pamphlet, which eu i^uiolibj rawien. Each ptmphfot wll* tut 10 wnU. £or «ny on. pmmphUt dalrrt, £53 10 ° 15 Years Ago j Miss Reva Kistler of Summit j left for Kalamazoo to begjn her second year at the normal school. 10 Years Ago George Henke and Clarence , Kronlein were entertained at a I farewell party at the Henry 'Kronlein home in Victory, before leaving for Portland, Ore., to visit friends and relatives. 5 Years Ago Dan Soli left for Holland to meet a group of coal-dock operators who he accompanied on a tour of coal mines in Kentucky and West Virginia. MARKETS AND FINANCE (Additional Markets on Page 6) Stock Averages, Sept. 18 (Compiled By The Associated Press) 30 15 15 60 Inclust Rails Util Stock*Net change .. D1.4 D.7 D.5 Dl 0 Today 73.4 207 38.4 51.3 Previous day .. 74.8 Month ago .... 65.1 Year ago 67.9 1939 High 1S39 Low 1938 High "Twenty-six." "And—what's your nameT" "Hunh?" He paused with appl« in mid-air, two bites missing, to stare at her. "What's your real name? Shot is a nickname, I know." "Why, uh, just call me Shot. Everybody does." "Are you ashamed of your name?" "No! Not none—not any, I'm not It's Archibald Lorenzo Rogers. My mother named me." "Why don't people call you that? Some of it, anyway." "They don't know it. I used to be Lorenzo, but you are the only man in Arizona that knows all of it Woman, I mean. Or man, either " "Then you trust me! I'm complimented." "You are not a—a tease, or a—a —well, a—" "I understand, Shot." She smiled sweetly at him. "But it's a grand name, really, and you can be proud of it. When you get a little older. Shot won't be your first choice." Because she was through eating then, she idly lifted the glasses to her eyes and focussed them. She swept them in a slow panorama, looking down. And all at once her movement stopped. "Shot!" she whispered, aa U somebody might hear. "Shot!" "Hunh? What Is It, Lorena?" "I think they've come. There ar« riders, driving cows!" He took the glasses and, refocused, trained them as he stared intently at what she had seen. By straining she could see enough with her naked eyes. For a half hour they eld not speak at all, save as he murmured description of the drivers' progress. They were Mexicans. They numbered at least 20 men. They had 50 to 60 head of cattle ahead of them, as near as he could judge, And, yea, again they were approaching the river. The stock were driven Into the water and turned upstream. Shot and Lorena saw them approach the west fork and avoid it, saw them driven on by the middle fork, too. Shot's mouth dropped open. His h«d and Lorena's were very close together as they crouched there, peering downward. "Grea-a-al hades, Lorena girl!" Shot breathed, after another quarter hour had passed. "Did you see that? They didn't take either one of the water courses. They drove those cows—by George—right on up the third branch of the river, the east fork, which is just plain dry sand! Where In the devil can they be going?" (To -« Continued) pects lower. » . .1 PETITION TO DETERMINE HEIRS STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said court, held ftt the pruuntt otfice, In the City of Ludington, In said county, on the llth day of September A. D. 19,19. Present: Hon. Owen J. Oavlgan, Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of John B. March Jr., Deceased. Clay F. Olmstead having filed in said court his petition praying that said court adjudicate and determine who were at the time of his death the legal heirs of said deceased and entitled to Inherit the real estate of which said deceased died seized, It Is ordered, That the 3rd day of October A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said probate office, be and Is hereby appointed for hearing said petition; It Is further ordered, that public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three successive wetks previous to said day of hearing. In The Ludington Dally News, n newspaper printed and circulated In said county. OWEN J. OAVIOAN. Judge of Probate. A true copy: ' OWEN J. GAVIGAN. Judge of Probate. Sept. 11, 18. 25. that said publication be continued once Mason. * til each week therein for at least Blx • At a session of suld Court,_lield nt the successive weeks or that she cause a copy of this Order to be personally served upon the defendants at least twenty days before the time above prescribed for their appearance. Description of land lu Bill of Complaint: Commencing at a point 553 feet West of the Quarter Post on the East side of Section 13, Town 18 North, Range 17 West, running thence West 60 feet, thence South 273 feet, thence East 60 feet, thence North 273 feet, to place of beginning, and also known as Lot 24 of Block 2. City Assessor's Western Addition to City of Scottvllle, except therefrom the West 6 feet of said Lot 24 heretofore conveyed to Norman V. McPhcrson and wife. Nora C. McPhtTson, by deed dated January 5. 1928. and recorded In Liber 89 of Deeds, Page 426. Dated at Ludington, Michigan, this 21st day of August. A. D. 1939. PETER R. VON SPRECKEN, Circuit Court Com'r. CLAY F. OLMSTEAD SR., Attorney for Plaintiff, Business Address: Ludington, Michigan. Aug. 23. 28, Sept. 5, 11, 18, 25. PETITION TO DETERMINE HEIRS STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said court, held at the probate olflce. In the City of Ludington. in said county, on the 6th day of September A. D. 1939. Present: Hon. Owen J. Qavtgan. Judge of Probate. In tlie Matter of the Estate of Charles Kollberg also written Charles Collberg, Deceased. Charles B. Kollberg having filed In said court his petition praying thnt said court adjudicate and determine who were at the time of his death the legal heirs of said deceased and entitled to inherit the real estate of which catd deceased died seized. It Is ordered, that the 2nd day of ' October A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the ! forenoon, at said probate office, be and Is hereby appointed for hearing said i petition; It Is further ordered, that public no- ! tice thereof be given by publication of ! a copy of this order, for three succes- ' sive wetks previous to said day of hearing. In The Ludtngton Dully News, a newspaper printed and circulated In said county. OWEN J. GAVIGAN. Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 11, 18. J5. ANNUAL ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Muson. At a session of said Court, held at the Probate Office In the City of Ludington In said County, on the 9th day of September A. D. 1939. Prtsent. Hon. Owen J. Gavigan, Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of David PETITION FOR ADMINISTRATION STATE OF MICHIGAN. The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held nt the Probate Office in the City of Ludington Ir. said County, ou the 2flth day of August A. D. 1939. Present. Hon. Owen J. Qavlgan. Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of John E. Larson. Deceased. Johanna Larson, having filed her petition, praying that an instrument Hied In said Court be admitted to Probate as the last will and testament of said de- ct-ased and that administration of said estate be granted to herself or home other suitable person. It Is Ordered. That the 10th day of October A. D. 1939 at ten A. M.. at said Piobate Office is hereby appointed for hearing said petition. It is Further Ordered. That Public notice thereof be giv^n by publication of a copy hereof for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing In The Lud.ngttm Dally News, a newspaper printed and circulated In Mid County. OWEN J. OAVIGAN. Judge of Prooate. A true copy. MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 5. 11. 18 deceased. Forrest having filed In said court her annual account as adminis- tratrix of said estate, and his petition praying for the allowance thereof. It Is Ordered. That the 5th day of October A. D. 1939. nt ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said Probate Office, be and Is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account: It Is Further Ordered. That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three Bucces- Mve weeks previous to said day of hearing. In The Ludington Dally News, a newspaper printed and circulated In said county. OWEN J. GAVIGAN.^ Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON. Register of Probate. Sept. 12. 18, 25. Probate Office In the City of Ludington In said County, on the 12th day of September A. D. 1939. Present, Hon. Owen J. Oavigan, Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of John W. Engle, Deceased. Lualngton State Bank, having filed In said Court the final administration account for Charles G. Franz and Its petition praying for the allowance thereof and for the assignment and distribution of the residue of said es- tfl tG* It'is Ordered, That the 5th day of October A. D. 1939, at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said Probate Office, be and is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account and hearing said petition; It is Further Ordered. That public i;otlce thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing, in The Ludington Dally News, a newspaper printed and circulated lu hald County. OWEN J. GAVIGAN. Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 18, 25, Oct. 2. NOTICE TO CREDITORS STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held at the Probate Office in the City of Ludington In the said County, on the 12th day of Sept.-mber, A. D. 1939. Present, Hon. Owen J. Qavlgan. Judge of Probate. PETITION FOR ADMINISTRATION STATE OF MICHIGAN. The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held at the Probate Office In the City of Ludington In said County, on the Hth day of September A. D. 1939. Pn sent. Hon. Owen J. Oavlgan. Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of Edward Wlllard McEmber. Deceased. Violet Kline, having filed In sard court her petition praying that the ad- ! of the Estate of August It" appearing to the court that the time for presentation of claims against said estate should be limited, and that a time and place be appointed to receive, examine and adjust all claims and demands against said deceased by and before said court: It Is Ordered. That creditors of gald deceased arc required to present their claims to said court at said Probate Offlct- on or before the 12th day of January A. D. 1940. nt ten o'clock In the forenoon, said time and place being hereby appointed for the examination^*, nnd adjustment of all claims and de-™ mauds ugnlnst said deceased. It Is Further Ordered. That public notice thereof be given by publication of n copy of this order for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing. In The Ludington Dally News a newspaper printed and circulated lu said county. OWEN J. GAVIGAN. Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Roister of ProbaK>. Sept. 18. 25. Oct. 2. KINAJ. ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHIGAN. The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a sewiion of said Court, held at the ministration of sal'd estate" bV granted i r>roh " u ' Office In the City of Ludington to Harold McEmber or to some other I ln saltl County, on the 12th day of ' ' September A. D. 1939. Present. Hon. Owen J. Gavlgan. Judge suitable person. It is Ordered. That the 16th day ol October A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the . of Probate. forenoon, at said probate office, be and In lnp Matter of the Estate of Belli Is hereby appointed for hearing said Vwder. deceased. petition. ; The Ludington State Bank, having It Is Further Ordered. That public i " lpd ln ! * lcl court tlie final account for notice thereof be given by publication Charles Q Franz, and lu petition prayer a copy of this order, once each wevit '"K 'or the allowance thereof, and for for three successive weeks previous to ' tlle appointment of an administrator .••aid day of hearing. In The Ludington ! * lln »'"' annexed to complete the »d- Dnlly News, a newspaper printed and ministration of said estate. It la Ordered. That the 5th day of October A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the circulated in snld county. OWEN J. OAVIOAN. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON. Register of Probate. Sept. 18. 25. Oct. 2. Judge of Probate. forenoon, nt sa'.d Probate Office, be and Is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account. It is Further Ordered. That public, notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three mjc- cthslve weeks previous to said day of '•tearing. In The Ludington Dally New*. NOTICE TO CREDITORS STATE OF MICHIGAN. „ The Probate Court for the County of » newspaper printed and circulated in 77.0 58.8 79.5 1938 Low ...... 49.2 21.4 16.8 16.7 23.3 15.7 23.5 12.1 38.9 37.7 30.8 40.6 33.7 37.8 24.9 Movement in Recent Years 1932 Low 17.5 3.7 23.9 1929 High 146.9 153.9 184.3 1927 Low 91.6 95.3 61.8 92.3 i 46.0 45.6 53.4 41.6 54.7 33.7 16.9 157.7 61.8 I Detroit Poultry i (Quotations in Cents) ! DETROIT. Sept. 18.—'/Hi—Poultry, 'steady; hens. 5 lb?. up. 17: under 5 !l>s.. 15; leghorn hens. 3 Ibs. up. 13: cocks. 10: 'leghorn cocks. 8: Rock -springers. 4'_. ! Ibs- up. 17; under 4'j Ibs.. 16; leghorn | springers. 14; young hen turkeys. 10 Ibs. 'up. 21: young torn turkeys, 15 Ibs. up. '21; ducks, white. 5 Ibs. up. 12: rabbits. 8. THE MARKETS Menus of the Day By MRS. ALEXANDER GEORGE (Associated Press Staff Writer) Baked Spiced Apple Slices 4 apples 1/4 teaspoon 1 cup dark cloves brown sugar >'» teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon i/ 4 cup vinegar cinnamon Pare and core the apples. Cut into crossway slices two-thirds of an inch thick. Place in a small baking dish. Top with the rest of the ingredients. Cover with a lid. Bake 10 minutes in a moderate oven. Uncover and bake 20 minutes or until tender when tested with a fork. Serve warm or cold. ««ii. •tamped with • U>rc*«eat lUmp, to Dr. U«M Cl«n<}«ilnt. in CM* of thU V? «- • Fruit-Sponge Tapioca >/3 cup granu- "i teaspoon lated tapioca grated lemon 3 , 4 cup grunu- rind lated sugar '/a teaspoon ',4 teaspoon salt grated orange 1 cup water rind % cup orange 3 egg yolks Juice 3 egg whites, 2 tablespoons beaten lemon juice Cook the tapioca, sugar, salt and water together for 10 minutes in a double boiler. Stir several times. Add the fruit juices, rinds and yolks. Cook for five minutes—or until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the heat. Beat well and fold in the whites. Pour into a shallow dish—glass preferred. Chill. Serve plain or with cream. Garnish with thin slices of oranges. I A lobster's life begins as a T*i;tm«t«t I tiny red egg hatched from a- •wl "Ik* I mono- innnn tn tnnn/in similar 1 mong eggs. 10,000 to 100,000 similar LOCAL MARKETS Light red kidney beans $2.75 Dark red kidney beans $3.00 Dark cranberry beans $2.50 Light cranberry beam; $2.50 White pta beans ....•• $2.00 Yelloweye beans $2.75 Poultry | Leghorn hens, 3 Ibs. and up lie i Heavy hens 14c i Plymouth Rock springers, , j under 4 Ibs 17c | Plymouth Rock springers, i Colored springers 15c ! 4 Ibs. and up 17c j Grain Shelled corn, cwt $1.05 Rye, cwt 85c Oats, cwt $1.00 Wheat, cwt $1.00 Produce Eggs 19c Hides Beef 4c Saginuw Beans (Quotations In Dollars and Cents) SAGINAW. Mich., Sept. 18. i,Vi— Michigan Bean Shippers' association Monday prices: Handplcked pea beans. per cwt.; 3.15; handplcked red kidneys, light. 3.50. dark, 3.50; handplcKed yel- loweyes, 3.00; handplcked choice re- cleaned cranberries, light, 3.00, dark, 2.50. Detroit Produce (Quotations In Dollars and Cents) DETROIT!, Sept. 18.—(#•)—(United States Department of Agriculture.)— Grapes: Mich, climax baskets Concords. 4-qt., 13; 12-qt., 25. Apples: Mich, bushel baskets and eastern crates, 2",-, In. mln. Wealthys and Wolf Rivers, mostly, 35-50, few low as, 25; Mclntosh. 75-1.00. - Celery: Mich, bunches, dozens, extra large, 35, medium, 22','a. Onlone: Mich. 50 Ib. sacks yellows, mostly, 60-65, few, 70, some low as, 50; 10 Ib. sacks yellows, 12-14. Peaches: Mich. bu. baskets and eastern crates, 2',4 in. mln., 1.25-1.35, 2 in. mln., fair* condition, 50-75. Pears: Mich. bu. baskets Bartletts. 2 In. mln., best, 1.35-1.65. Seckels, few, 75. Plums: Mich. >/z bu. baskets Italians, mostly. 90. Potatoes: Mich. 100 Ib. sacks Round Whites. 1.25-1.50; Idaho Russets, 2.152.25; Maine Chlppewas, 1.85-1.90; N. J. Cobblers, 1.85-1.90; Ind. Bliss Triumphs, 2.00. Detroit Dairy (Quotations in Cents) DETROIT. Scp!. 13.—-/P)—Butter, best creamery in tubs. 26'.2-2" 1 ,a. Eggs, current receipts. 10; dirties, 14; checks, 13. Chicago Potatoes (Quotations In Dollars and Cents) CHICAGO. Sept. 18.—i/W—< United States Department of Agriculture.) — Potatoes. 214. on track, 357. total U. 3. shipments. 483 Saturday, Sunday. 48; supplies rather heavy, demand fair, market weaker. Idaho Russet Burbanks. U. S. No. 1, washed, under initial ice and ventilation. l.GO-85. mostly. 1.70-75; Oregon Bli.ss Triumphs, U. S. No. 1, washed, under ventilation, car. 2.25; Minnesota Hollendale section Cobblers. U. S. No. 1, car, 1.20; Minnesota sandland section Cobblers. U. S. commercials, few sales, 1.00; North Dakota Red Rlvc-r Valley section Bliss Trl- X:mphs. 85 percent or better. U. S. No. 1 quality, 1.30-45: cobblers, U. S. 1. few sales. 1.25; Wisconsin Cobblers, U. S. No. 1, few sales, 1.25-30; Indiana Cobblers. U. 3. No. 1. washed, 1.3T l /2', Nebraska Bliss Triumphs. 85 percent U. 8. No. 1 quality, car, 1.60. Chicago Poultry (Quotations In Cents) CHICAGO, Sept. 18.— JPi— Poultry, live, no cars. 12 trucks, firm; hens, 4!i Ibs. up. 16. under 4 '/a Ibs., 14; leghorn hens, 11; broilers, 2','z Ibs, and under, colored. l£i/ 2 . Plymouth Rock, 18. White Rock. 18. leghorn broilers, 2 Ibs. and under. H'.j; leghorn springs, over 2 Ibs., 12',2'. springs. 4 Ibs. up. colored. 14, Plymouth Rock, 16, White Rock. 1G; under 4 Ibs., colored, 14. Plymouth Rock, IS'i. ! White Rock, 15li; bareback chickens, 12; roosters. 11. leghorn roosters. lO'.i: ducks. 4I... Ibs. up. colored, 12'/2. white. 12',i, small colored, 12'/2. small white, 12V Z ; gee.-ie. old, 13. young, 15; turkeys, toms. 17, hens, 18. Detroit Livestock (Quotations In Dollars and Cents) DETROIT, Sept. 18.—(/H)—Cattle. 1,500; steady; good to choice yearlings. 9.75-11.00; fair to good yearlings, 8.509.50; good to choice heavy steers, 9.5010.50; fair to good heavy steers, 8.509.25; common butcher cattle, 5.50-0.50; canner and cutter cows, 4.00-5.50; best butcher and heavy bologna bulls, 7.258.00; milkers and springers, 50.00-75.00. Calves, 900; steady; best calves, 12.50; fair to good, 10.50-12.00; seconds, 9.50- 1P.50; culls and common, 5.00-9.00. Sheep and lambs, 1,500; 25 cents higher; best lambs, 9.75; heavy fat sheep, 2.00-50; culls and common, 1.50-2.00. Hogs receipts, 1,000; market pros- Goiter is almost unknown among the Japanese because they eat a great deal of sea food which contains iodine. Chicago Dairy (Quotations In Cents) CHICAGO. Sept. 18.—W—Butter, 598,550. unsettled; creamery—93 gcorc. 2834-29'/.i; 92. 28'/ 4 ; 91, 27; 90. 38; 89, 25; 88, 24 \\; 90 centralized carlots, 26 3 /4. Eggs 7,774, easy; fresh graded extra firsts local, 19, cars, 20; firsts local, 18','4, cars, 18'/ 2 ; current receipts, 16. LEGAL NOTICES PETITION TO DETERMINE HEIRS STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said court, .held at the probate office, In the City of Ludington, In said county, on the 8th day of September A. D. 1939. Present: Hon. Owen J. Qavlgan, Judgo of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of William Schumacher, Deceased. Clay F. Olmstead having filed Jri said court his petition praying that said court adjudicate and, determine who were at the time of his death the legal heirs of said deceased and entitled to inherit the real estate of which said deceased died seized, It is ordered, that the 2nd day of October A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said probate office, be and is hereby appointed for hearing Bald petition; It is further ordered, that public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing, In The Ludington Dally News, a news- pa par printed and circulated in eald county. OWEN J. QAVIOAN. Judge o.I Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Bept. 11, 18, 25. .1 _ .. PETITION TO APPOINT COMMISSIONER STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held at the Probate Office In the City of Ludington in said County, on the 1st day of Sept. A. D. 1939. Prr-sent. Hon. Owen J. Gavigan. Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of William Beard. Deceased. Donald O. Beard and Caroline Beard Anderson having filed In said court their petition praying that commissioners be appointed to make partition of the real estate In Bald petition described. It is Ordered. That the 27th day of September A. D. 1S39. at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said probate office, be and is hereby appointed for hearing said petition; It Is Further Ordered, That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing. In The LuUington Dally News, a newspaper printed and circulated In said county. OWEN J. QAVIOAN. Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 5, 11, 18. FINAL ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHFGAN, I The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held at the i Probate Office In the City of Ludington in said County, on the 1st day of September A. D. 1939. Present, Hon. Owen J. Oavlgan, Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of John Osmaloski. Deceased. Blanche Osmaloskl Ilyan having filed in said Court her final administration account, and her petition praying for the allowance thereof and for the assignment and distribution of the residue of said estate It is Ordered, That the 26th day of September A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said Probate Office, be and Is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account and hearing said petition; It Is Further Ordered, That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing, In The Ludington Dally News, a newspaper printed and circulated In said County. OWEN J. GAVIGAN, Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 5, 11, 18. Mawin. At a session of s.ild Court, held nt the Probate Offlc? in the Cltv of Ludington In the said County, on the llth day of September, A. D. 1939. Pnstnt. Hon. Owen J. Oavlgnn. Judge of Probate. j In the Matter of the Estate of Maude I Charon Kolberg. Deceased. ' It appearing to the court that the time for presentation of claims against >n)d e»tnt<- should r«> limited, nnd that u time and place be appointed to n- ctlve. examine and adju.t all claims i'nd demand* against Mild deceased by iind before wild court: It If Ordered. That creditors of said deceased are required to pn-K-nt their claims to Kitd court nt wild Probate Ofllce on or before the 12th day of January A. D. 1940. at ten o'clock in the forenoon, said time and place being hereby appointed for the examination and adjustment of all claims and demands against snld deceased. It Is Further Ordered. Thnt public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order for three successive weeks previous to wild day of hearing. In Tlie Ludington Dally New*, a newspaper printed and circulated In county. A true copy: OWEN J. OAVICJAN. Judge of Probate. MVRTLE MAT8OX. Register of Probate. Sept. 18. 25. Oct. 2. said county. OWEN J. OAVIGAN. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 18. 25. Oct. 2. Judge of Probate. PETITION FOR ADMINISTRATION STATF. OF MICHIGAN. The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held at the Probate Office In the City of Ludlivjton In void County, on the Nth day of Si pt mber A. D. 1939. Present. Hon. Owen J. Oavlgan, Judgo of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of Nicholas Sarres. Deceased. Thomas Zounmras. having filed In said court his petition praying that the hdmlnlslratlon of said i state be granted to Wilfrid Hocking or to some other suitable person. It Is Ordered, That the 16th day of October A. D. 1939, at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said probate office, be and Is hereby appointed for bearing petition: mi Id It la Further Ordered, That public notice thereof be given by publication of n copy of this order, once each weefe for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing. In The Ludington Dally News, a newspaper printed nnd circulated In said county. OWEN J. GAVIGAN. STATE OP MICHIGAN In the Circuit Court for the County of Mason in Chancery. Marie Moore, Plaintiff, ' vs. William Lawrence and Newbury Gordon, and/or their unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or assignees, Defendants. In this Cause It appearing that William Lawrence and Newbury Gordon, and/or their unknown helm, devisees, legatees or assignees, are necessary nnd proper parties to the above entitled Cause, and the Attorney for Plaintiff having made and filed his affidavit showing the whereabouts and residence of William Lawrence and Newbury Gordon, and/or their unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or assignees, are' unknown to said affiant. On Motion of Clay F. Olmstead 8r., Attorney for Plaintiff: It Is ordered that the appearance of the defendants herein be entered in this Cause within three months from the date of this Order and that in case of the appearance of them, they respectively cause their answer to be served on the plaintiff's Attorney within fifteen days after the service on them or their respective Attorney of a. copy of said Bill and notice of this order and that in default thereof, said Bill will be taken as confessed by them. And it is further ordered that within twenty days after the date of this Order said plaintiff cause copy to be pub- llahed In The Ludington Daily News, a newspaper printed, published and circulating In said County of Mason and A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probute. Sept. 18, 25, Oct. 2. Judge of Probate. I Ludington State Banlt (Trust Department) FINAL ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHIGAN. The Probate Court for the Countr of Ma son. At n «»sj.|on of said Court, held at the Probate Office In the City of Uidlngtort In *nl<\ County, on the 1st day of September A. D. 1939. Prcwnt. Hon. Owen J. Cmvloan. Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the E»tatc of Wescott H. Hrnd. Deceased. Ludington State Bonk having filed In said Court Itx final RdmlnlKtrntlon nc- count. and it* petition praying for the allowance thereof and for the analtjn- mrnt and distribution of the residue of *ald estate. It In Ordered. That the 28th day of September A. D. 1939. at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at kald Probate Office, be and IH hereby appointed for examining nnd allowing Mild account and hearing natd petition: It Is Further Ordered. That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three euc- cesslve WC.-KH previous to iiald day of hearing. In The Ludington Dally Ni>wi, (i newnpoper printed and circulated ID wild County. OWEN J. OAVIQAN, Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 5. 11. 18. FINAL ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a session of said Court, held nt the Probate Office in the City of Ludington In said County, on the 12th day of September A. D. 1939. Present, Hon. Owen J. Gavlgnn, Judge of Probate. In the Matter of the Estate of 'Mary J. Engle, deceased. Ludington State Bank, having filed In said Court the final account for Charles O. Franz and its petition praying for the allowance thereof, and for the appointment of an administrator with will annexed to complete the administration of said estate, It Is Ordered, That the 5th day of October A. D. 1939, at ten o'clock In the forenoon, at said Probate Office, be and is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account; It Is Further Ordered, That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing, in The -Ludlngton Dally News, n newspaper printed and circulated in said county, OWEN J. OAVIQAN, FINAL ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT STATK OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason. At a setuilon of «nld Court, held at the Probate Office In the City of Ludington In the said County, on the 31st day of October, A. D. 1939. Present. Hon. Owen J. Onvlgan, Judge of Probute. In the Matter of the Entutc of Catherine Shook, Deceased. It appearing to the court that the lime for presentation of claims against said estate should be limited, and that a time and place be appointed to receive, examine nnd adjust all claims and dimnnds against said deceased by and before said court: It Is Ordered, That creditors of snlA, deceased nre required to present thetT> claims to said court at said Probate Office on or before thu 4th day of Junu- nry A. D. 1940, at ten o'clock In tht forenoon, said time and place being hereby appointed for the examination und adjustment of all claims and demands against said deceased. It Is Fairther Ordered. That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order for threo suo- ccnslve. weeks previous to said day of hearing, In The Ludington Dally New*, a newspaper printed and circulated in said county. OWEN J. GAVIOAN. Judge of Probate. A true copy: MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 5, 11, IB. A true copy: I MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Judge of Probate. FINAL ADMrNISTAATION* ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHIGAN. The Probate Court lor the County of FINAL ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNT STATE OF MICHIGAN, The Probate Court for the County of Mason, At a session of said Court, held at the Probate Office in the City of Ludington In salt! County, on the 5th day of September A, D. 1939. Present, Hon. Owen J. Qavlgan, Judge of Probate, In the Matter of the Estate of. May, Francis, Christina and Gladys Chadwick, Minors. Ludington State Bank having filed in ld court a .final account as administrator w.w.a. of the estate of Charles a. Franz, former guardian of said estate, nnd his petition praying for the allowance thereof, It Is Ordered. That the 2nd day of October A. D. 1939, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, at said Probate Office be and is hereby appointed for examining and allowing said account; It Is Further Ordered, That public notice thereof be given by publication of a copy of this order, for three successive weeks previous to said day of hearing, in The Ludington Dally News ft newspaper printed and circulated In said county. A true copy: ' OWEN J. QAVIQAN, of Pwbat., MYRTLE MATSON, Register of Probate. Sept. 11, 18, 39.

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free