Ironwood Daily Globe from Ironwood, Michigan on May 14, 1965 · Page 3
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Ironwood Daily Globe from Ironwood, Michigan · Page 3

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Ironwood, Michigan
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Friday, May 14, 1965
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Page 3
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FRIDAY, MAY 13, 1965. IRONWOOD DAILY GIOBE, IRONWOOD, MICHIGAN THRK aged mines have won "Sentinels of Safety" trophies in the national safety competit i o n for . 1964. The Geneva Mine at Ironwood is winner in the under-1 ground me.tal group, and the Hoyt Lakes Mine of Erie Mining Company is winner In the open pit group. "We extend heartiest congratulations on behalf of the American Mining Congress to " the management, supervising sta f f and operating personnel at these two mines. Through their combined efforts both mines achieved perfect reco r d s thro ugh 1964. The Geneva worked 465,639 man hours, while coveted "Sentinels of Safe- the Hoyt Lakes work force com- Award By Geneva Mine DULUTH — Two area mines managed by Pickands Mather k Co. had the best open pit and underground metal mining safety records in the country for 1964. The mining department of Erie Mining Company, Hoyt Lak e s, and the Geneva Mine, Ironwood, won both awards in the me t a 1 group of the 1964 national safety competition and will receive the coveted "Sentinels 'y" trophy. Erie's win was particularly outstanding as the open pit award covers both metal and non-metal mines. Sponsored by the U. S. Bureau of Mines and the American Mining Congress the winn e r s were selected in national competition with 1,028 other mining operations. J. Allen Overtoil, Washington, D. C.. executive vice-presid e n t, American Mining Congress, is notifying Pickands Mather & Co. Df the award said. "It is my pleasure to advise you that two MeiTimott. acting director of the pileted an astounding total of 1,509,670 man hours — in each case without a single lost-time accident. "Recognized by mining men throughout the nation as the highest, safety award in the industry, the 'Sentinels of Safety' has effectively advanced the cause of accident prevention, and we are delighted to see that it has been won by not one, but two Pickands Mather mines." In a letter to the comp a n y about the awards Frank G. Pickands Mather & Co. man- WHEN YOU OWN A REO YOU CAN HARDLY WAIT FOR THE GRASS TO GROW! Reo 18-inch and 21-inch POWER-TRIM LAWN MOWERS! • 3-hp. "EZEE-START" engine • Automatic impulse starter • F'ingertip height, adjustment on each wheel • All controls on handle • Full 1-year warranty BEAUCHAMP ELECTRIC & CARBURETOR COMPANY Ironwood, Michigan 128 Aurora SI. Bureau of employes Mines, stated, U. S. "All merit heartiest congratulations for the part each had in preventing accidents and establish i n g such an excellent safety recor d in this nationwide competit ion. Please accept my best wishes for the continuation of you r success in promoting safety in the mineral industries of 'this country.' Pickands Mather & Co. man- i aged operations now have won [the "Sentinels of Safety" trophy | a total of 29 times times the com! petition began in 1925. For un- Church Services IRONWOOD Little Girl's Point, Immanuel Lutheran (Missouri) The Rev. R. W Heikkinen, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45: worship service, 10:45. St. John's Lutheran CLCA), Airport Road, North Ironwood The Rev Oliver A Hallb e r •». pastor. Sunday School 9: English family worship at St. Paul Lutheran, 10:45. Seventh-day Adventist Ay e r and Curry. Pastor L. A. Bierlien. Sabbath School Saturday, 9:30; worship service, 10:50: children's story hour, 3:30, at new school on East Cin- nebar Street, Bessemer. BEROLAND Calvary Baptist. The Rev. Dougl^? McNeil, pastor Sunday School 10; morning wors h i p, 11: evening service, 7:30. Methodist. The Rev. James rtilliaff pastor Worship service, 9:30; Sunday School, 10:30. St. Ann Roman Catholic The •iev George Pernaski, pastnr Mass, 9-30; confessions before Ma.ss Trin-ty Lutheran (Missouri) The Rev David Musall. pastor. Installation Of VFW Post Officers Held The Doctor Says By W. G. BRANDSTADT, M. D. The "death ray" of science fiction is here. Although laser . light rays can be deadly, they ! have important uses in many v ter .i fields. 1 These rays get their name from the principle employed— light •vnrliiM'.E.Uon by the aim- Mrs. Gordon Ongie served asj ulated emission of radiation ONTONAGON — Installation of 1965-66 officers was held at the meeting of the Auxiliary to Lake of the Clouds Post, ans of Foreign Wars, held at the Post Home. and officials Sunday School, 9:45; worship! TO GET DEGREE—James W Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs Stephen R. Thomas, Route 2, Ironwood, will receive his master of science degree in mathematics May 26 at the University of Tucson. Tucson, Ariz. He received a three year fellowship to work toward his doctorate from the National Aeronautical Space Administration to start in September. During the summer he I will work at the Laurence Ral diation Laboratory in Liver' more. Calif., as a mathemati- An ordinary light wave is supercharged after it pa s s e s through a ruby crystal The beam that is emitted may be as thin as the lead in your pencil, but- its light is more powerfu ! than that of '.he sun. It c a n burn through steel Its use in medicine is still experimental but. because it can be focused on a very sma 1 1 area, it has been used to destroy cancers without damagi n g cian in the theoretical physics service, 7:30 p.m., with the Rev. i depar tment. He graduated from Dale Hoffschneider, j officiating. i rtRUCC CROSSING 1 Apostolic Lutheran. Sunday i School, 10: Confirmation Class, 1:30; services in English and Finnish. 2. with the Rev. Ani drew Mickelson officiating. ; Bethany Lutheran The Rev j Fred Bergfeld. pastor. Worship service, 9: Sunday School, 10. EWEN First Lutheran (LCA). The Ironwood, j the Lu ther L. Wright High School in 1959 and Michigan Tech at Houghton in 1963. the installing officer. Offi c e r s installed included president. Mrs. Robert James Bailey; senior vice president. Mrs George A Johnson: junior vice president. Mrs. Mable Roehm: treasurer, Mrs. Robert Hebert; secretary. Mrs. John R. Bailey; conductress, Mrs. Gordon Ongie: guard. Mrs. Marland Bradley: chaplain. Mrs. Charles Hutchinson; trus-i tees, Mrs. Harold Bailey. M r s. j Norval Barry; musician, Mrs.; John Beck: colors bearers. Mrs ! Ernest Jones, Mrs. Will i a m | Stenson Jr., Mrs. James Zartner,' and Mrs. R. Jumisko; banner; bearer, Mrs. Marie Broemer; flag bearer, Mrs. Harold Bailey: i historian, Mrs. Stenson, patriotic j instructor, Mrs. George Luoma. i It was announced that the j auxiliary membership is 84 per: ~~"~~ cent paid up and delinquent i Blood Bank TeQrtl to members are asked to pay their'%/• :*. _ f u ftcn ; 4 ,,| dues and cancer insurance. VI5IT ar nospnai It was decided that Poppy ONTONAGON - The Blood Days will be held May 27-30 with '< Bank Team from Bay City will j have Anne Worachek. Becky H e m- ming, Douglas Johnson. Charles Richardson and Barbara Vola- Seventh grade—Jean Br o w n, JoAnn Brown, Mary Kemppainen and Delores Novak. derground metal mines they in- Rev J^hn Linna pastor. Sunday eluded the Gary mine at Hurley j School, 9:45; worship service, 11. in 1938 and the Newport mine in Ironwood in 1944. For open pit operations they included the Wakefield mine of Wakefield in 1928 and the Plymouth mine of Wakefield in 1930. The Geneva mine is no longer in operation, having been closed in February of this year. IT'S NEW AND EXCITING... Be sure to enjoy a visit soonl *Steaks * Chops *Lobster •^Italian Foods *Chicken A specialty of the house: SEAFOOD FIESTA PLATTER EL RANCHO 12 Miles South of Hurley on Hiway 51 • Closed Every Tuesday Dial Mercer 476-2168 for reservations SICK OF NOT QUITE HEARING? V ) S Are you hearing your boss? Missing appoint- "^yf( ments because you "didn't understand"? Miss\ * ing out on family fun? Zenith has made it possible for you to do something to help you "understand what you hear". A HEARING AID YOUR EAR WILL LIKE. . . A PRICE YOUR POCKETBOOK WILL LOVE1 Methodist. The Rev James; .iilliaid, pastor. Sunday! School, 9:30; morning worship, 11. St. Mark's Episcopal. The Rev. Carlson Gerdau. vicar. Holy Communion and sermon, 11, followed by parish dinner. GREENLAND Met*>ndist The Rev Geo r g e A. Luciani, pastor. Morning worship, 8; Church School, 9. St. Peter & Paul Roman Cath- lie rhf Rev. Norbert LaCosse, pastor Sunday Mass, 9; Holy Day viasses, 6:30 p.m.; conles- sions Saturday, 4 to 5 p.m. KENTON Methodist. The Rev. Jam *> s Hilliard, pastor. Worship service, 7 jO p.m. MARENISCO Community Presbyterian The Rev. Winifred Lomas, minister. Worship service, 11. Messiah Lutheran (Missouri). The Rev Clifford Brege, pastor Sunday School, 10:30; worship service, 11:30. St. Catherine's Roman Catholic The Rev Samuel Bottom, Villa St. Thomas, associa t e s. pastor, with Techny Fath e r s, Masses. 7:30 and 9:30. MASS St. Paul's Lutheran (LCA). The Rev. A. A. Lepisto, pastor. English worship, 10; Finnish worship, 11:15. "Kick-off" for Lutheran Development Fund. PAYNESVILLE Apostolic Lutheran. Sunday School, 9:30. Our Savior's'Lutheran (LCA). The Rev. John Linna, pas tor. Morning worship, 8; Sunday School, 9:30. ROCKLAND St. Paul's Methodist. The Rev. George A. Luc 1 a n i, pas t o r. Church School, 10; worship service, 7:30 p.m. St. Mary's Roman Catholic. The Rev. Norbert LaCosse, pastor. Sunday Masses, 7:30 and 10:30; weekday Masses, 7:30; Holy Day Masses, 7:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; confessions Saturday, 7 to 8 p.m. SAXON Saxon-Gurney Community. The Rev. Nathan L. Daynard, minister. Worship service, 9. S1DNAW Methodist. The Rev. Jam e s Hilliard, pastor. Sunday School, 10:30; worship service. 6. St. David's Episcopal. The Rev. Carlson Gerdau, vicar. No service this Sunday. Members are asked to attend services at L'Anse at 6 p.m. TOPAZ St. Paul's Lutheran (Missouri). The Rev. David Musall, pastor. Sunday School, 10:45; worship service, 7:30 p.m.. at Bergland Trinity Lutheran. TROUT CREEK Assembly of God. The Rev. Donald L. Meece, pastor. Sunday School, 10; morning worship, 11; Young People's meeting, 6:30; evening worship 7:30 Presbyterian. The Rev. Arthur DeVries, minister. Sund a y School, 9; worship service, all members participating. Mrs. Norval Barry was ap-; pointed to puurchasc memorial; day gifts for the Gold Star Mothers. Mrs. John R. Bailey presented a report on the recent dance which was a decided success. A moment of silent prayer was held in memory of Mrs. Donald Bussiere. After the meeting, a social hour was enjoyed and lunch w a s served by Mrs. Robert Chapman, Mrs. Jumisko and Mrs. Stenson. weigh The next meeting will be held June 7. be at the Ontonagon Memo rial Hospital Sunday. May 16, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. for the purpose of drawing blood for replacement. All persons owning blood are asked to have their donors at the hospital during those hours. Also, this is an opportunity for family units or organizations wishing to build a reserve for their members, to do so. Donors should be between the ages of 21 and 50 and should 135 pounds or more. the surrounding healthy tissue The laser beam can be used tor, this purpose only where a can- i cer can be seen on the surface of the skin or a body cavity that can be reached through so m e such device as a cystoscope i bladder * ^astroscope * stomach i 01 proctoscope ' rectum i. Othei tumors exposed in the conventional way by surgical operation have been 'reated by laser, will, fixcellent results i Another experimental use in a process similai 'o arc welding that is applied to detached retinas The laser beam ca u s e s coagulation ol the tissues which then become adherent and re- 1 | main "glued" 'ogether This has 1 the advantage of working with i lightning speed The patient is j not required to hold his eye still i for more than a thousandth of i a second 1 The rays may also be used to ; stop bleeding from small blood vessels. It would seem that the '"death ray." when properly used, can also be a life saver i Its use will be limited, however 1 until more knowledge is obi tained as to how it works and what measures are necessary ' for its safe handling. Q—Would it be harmful to 10 chest X rays in one posure to a limited part of yoitl body. Everyone is exposed to an amount of radiation from tlit atmosphere that is 100 times greater than the amount you would get from having a chest X-ray 12 times a year. Your doctor understands the dangers involved in over-exposure to X rays and when he orders an X ray he considers that the benefits to be gained far outweigh any possible hazard. Q—Can shock treatments be given in a doctor's office .A—This is not an office procedure. It requires a team consisting of a doctor and one or more nurses specially trained in this method of treatment. Careful supervision is required to prevent accidental injury. Radio Dispatched year ; A—No. Modern X-ray equip- 1 ment gives you a very short ex- 1 Ready-Mix Concrete Co. Old Penokee Mine Site IRONWOOD 932-3540 932-3141 i Concrete Anywhere, Anytime of the Year—Sand, Gravel and Concrete Reinforcing Honor Roll at Ewen Is Told Trinity Lutheran (LCA) The Rev. John Linna, pastor. Worship service, 9:30; Sunday School, 10:45. WINCHESTER St. William's Catholic INI i s- sion The Rev. W A. Torkild- sori, pastor Mass, 9:30. EWEN—The honor roll for the fifth marking period of the 196465 school year at the Ewen High School has been announced by school officials. It is as follows: Seniors—Richard Royley, Phyllis Kohtala, Barbara Kopsi, Nancy Miller. Laurelee Ahlman. Hazel Pouttu, Isabel Sain, Dar- 10.! lene Mattson, Robert Kemppain- 'Lire-a-Bike' Program To Be Held Saturday ONTONAGON — The "Lite-a- Bike" program by the C u b Scouts of Ontonagon will be held Saturday morning at 9 a.m. The event will be at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post Home on River Street. This program is for all two wheel bikes in the village, non-scouts and also girls of all Sunday j ages. Seven strips of reflective tape will be applied by members of the VFW and the Boy Scouts. Average Is 37 Bushels Winter Wheat Per Acre WASHINGTON (API — The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday Michigan farmers averaged 37 bushels of winter wheat per acre on 846,000 acres for a total yield of 31.3 million bushels. The department estimated the total national crop at 978 million bushels. If the sun were made of best quality coal, it would have burnt out within 8,000 years. en and Bonnie Swanson. Juniors—Kathy Worachek, Alice Ojala, Judy Kangas, Susan Suomumaki, Arlene Kangas, Roger Hoffstrom, Eva Pjelto. John Koski, Arlene Maki, Jim Pitkanen, Phil Moilanen. Sophomores—Brenda Jokisalo, David Rowley. Ruth Harju, Joan Kangas. Elizabeth Juhola, Mae Jacobson, Alice Virmala, Robert Franti and Bruce Korri. Freshmen — Patty Manninen. June Niemi. Keith Knuutila. Kenneth Ranta. Rebecca Pelto and Sylvia Koski. Eighth grade—Mary Koski, Kristine Kuehnl, Anita Hie k s, TAB ONLY 1 CALORIE PER 6 OZ. SERVING Buy A 6 Pack Today AT YOUR FAVORITE STORE Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Ironwood & Ashland Past Matrons Club Holds Its Meeting ONTONAGON — A meeting of the Past Matrons Club was held at the home of Mrs. Roger Watt with Mrs. William McFar lane as co-hostess. Dessert and coffee was served at 7:30 to 11 members A short business meeting was conducted by Mrs. Robert Leslie, after which the evening wa spent playing cards. Honors in bridge were awarded Mrs. G. A Townsend and in pinochle to Miss Mary Mitchell. The next meeting will be held June 7, the place and hostesses to be announced later. SMALL BIRD New Zealand's smallest bird bears the militant name of rifleman. Only three inches long, it is a poor flyer and prefers climbing trees to flying to the top. per M per Economy grade WHITE FIR 2 x 4's in 8 to 16' lengths PINE SHIPLAP 28x68 Wood COMBINATION DOORS 1 inch x 8 ft. FILON PANELS In green .white yellow and beige GARAGE DOORS Complete with glass A hardware FORSLUND LUMBER COMPANY 85" 95°° 17* $495 h f 50 62 FREE ESTIMATED IRONWOOD DIAL 932-2311 A Variety of Items and pets were sold last week by smart folks using the Daily Globe Want-Ads to "tell what they have to sell/' Here are just a few of the result-getters: Sold! Sold! SMALLER SIZE The Delegate's tiny Tenite case is contoured to nestle neatly, comfortably behind the ear. Lighter too-only 'A oz. with battery! BIGGER VALUE You can pay more, but you can't buy a better-built instrument than The Delegate. Get the economy of Zenith quality through the years. WIDER USE Available in two power levels for more individual compensa- tions within a wide range of mild to moderate losses. PRECISION PERFORMANCE Silicon transistorized circuitry for top efficiency. New Zenith silver oxide battery lasts up to 83 hours in mild loss cases. GREATER SATISFACTION Only Zenith gives you all 3 "peace-of-mind" benefits. Ask us for details of our 10-Day Money-Back Trial Privilege,One Year Written Factory Warranty and Five Year After-Purchase Protection Plan. See many othrer Zenith hearing aids at MATTSON'S TV .SALES & SERVICE 223 E. McLeod Ave. Dial 932-0510 HOMEOWNER SPECIALS EAVES O CC ^ DOWN- 4 fY TROUGH . . LlJ »/* SPOUT . . . | %J OTHER ACCESSORIES IN STOCK! STEEL CLOTHES POSTS 175 9 each CEDAR CLOTHES POSTS IB-It 1 75 ea. SKA KING OUTBOARD VHorsepower motor—A-1 condition—$45. Phone 000-UOOO GIRL'S BICYCLE—24" Schwinn. In good condition — 320. Phone 000-OOUO Sold! Sold! IBfiO RAMBLER—AMERICAN — Stiek shift, riidin. A-1 condition throughout —S:iOO. Cull OOO-OOUO before 1 p.m CADTOP BOAT CATtniER 'onc-n\an i. Phone 000-0000 CEDAR FENCE POSTS 7 «t 85 C ea. FASTERON 2-HOUR DRY VARNISH 2 98 Sold! Sold! WELCH BUGGY—in good condition— SI") Nursery eliair—SZ. Inquire at 1100 N. Hemlock, Ironwood. FULL-BRED COCKER SPANIEL — 1 weeks old imili'—ideal for children— SIS. Phone 000-0000. Sold! CASH REGISTER — nddins niarhmi-- type—S30. Trailer—16" wheel meeds repairs i—$5. Phone 000-UOOO. Johns Mmsville 235-lb. SEAL-0-MATIC SHINGLES 11 75 SQUARE F. J. HACERLUMBER CO., inc. I. AVER ST., IRONWOOD PHONE 932-0120 73 Years of Service on the Range-Established Since 1892 Use The Daily Globe Want-Ads and You Can Sell Your "Don't Wants," Too! The COST Is Small, the ACTION Fast! Ironwood Daily Globe The Home Newspaper of the Gogebic Range and The Ontonagon Country

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