Panama City News-Herald from Panama City, Florida on June 21, 1974 · Page 15
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Panama City News-Herald from Panama City, Florida · Page 15

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Panama City, Florida
Issue Date:
Friday, June 21, 1974
Page:
Page 15
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'it East Has 3 Quarterbacks LUBBOCK, Tex. (UPij Three premier quarterbacks for the East will head an explosive offense with the run and the pass In the 14th annual Coaches All • America football game Saturday nlghtr East Carolina's Carl Sum* merell, Mississippi's Norris Weese and Georgia's Andy Johnson will share the quarter* backing assignment for Pitts* burgh coach Johnny Majors' East. Majors says he will be using all three during the game. "Johnson Is an excellent runner who can throw, Neese Is a master of the option, pltchout and short patterns and Summered can hit the deep receivers," Majors said. "It's going to be a real exciting offense." Summerell, headed for the New York Giants, expects the pass to play an important part of the East attack. "It will depend upon how the game gets started, but I expect we'll be passing more than running," Summerell said. "Of course, if we jump to a quick lead and need to eat up the clock, we will try to stick to the ground. "I just hope I get to play — and 1 feel I will get to play some," he said. "In fact, with It being as-hot as it will be Satur* day night, all three of us will get plenty of operating time." Weese also feels the pass will be the name of the offense used by the East. "I've been throwing in rookie camp, and my arm is In pretty good shape," Weese said. He was a fourth-round draft choice But Majors plans to use the Georgia Star at both positions. Jackson wants to make it In pro football, but If he runs Into trouble and falls he also has a pro baseball chance. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles. "Right now I'm Interested in football," he said. "The baseball scouts haven't said too much to me because they know I'm going to camp by Los Angeles, but signed I with the Patriots and because I Instead with Hawaii of the New .didn't play baseball last year," World Football League. he said. "When you have receivers "In football, I know the chan­ like we have In this game, it ce is here right now," Jackson doesn't take long to get the said. "But in baseball I might passing game together," he t spend several years In the said. "We also spent time early [minor leaguesand maybe never In the week working with the jmake the major leagues. In centers, and I don't see any .football, I'll know this summer trouble there, either." Jackson says he probably will play some at running back, too. "I'm not big enough for a pro quarterback (64), 190 pounds), and the New England Patriots plan to look at me at running back," he said. "Of course, I'm not going to be any too big there either. But It should do me some good to get back Into the feel of NEWS-HERALD, Panama City, fit,, Friday, JiWf % 1IM McKeon Sees More No-Hitters jlf I can cut It —there's no I waiting like In baseball." He was offered a pro baseball «contract when he graduated ffrom high school, but chose football and college instead. Klckoff for Saturday's game will be 8:30 p.m. (EDT), with a near-capacity crowd of 45,000 expected for Jones Stadium. A . national audience will view the playing running back going to the Patriots." before i game on ABC television. IP? eg,"' STEVE BUSBY Braves Sign No. 1 Choice ATLANTA (UPI) - The Atlanta Braves announced Thursday they have signed their No. 1 draft choice, catcher Dale Murphy of Portland, Ore., for an undisclosed bonus. The 18-year-old Murphy, who batted .466 for Wilson High School in Portland, will report to the Braves' rookie team at Klngsport, Tenn., of the Appalachian League. MILWAUKEE, Wis. (UPI) — Double no-hlt Steve Busby may not be through yet— according to Kansas City Royals Manager Jack McKeon. "He'll have three or four some day," McKeon said of his 24-year-old star after the Royals, behind Busby's near perfect game, blanked theMllwaukee Brewers 2-0 Wednesday night. It was the second no-hitter of Busby's two-year career, making him the first player In major league history to toss nohltters In each of his first two seasons. The only Brewer to reach base off him was George Scott, with a second inning walk. Busby said he was much more happy with this no-hltter than with the one he threw a year ago. "This was the type of game I can be happy with," Busby said. "I didn't make a whole lot of bad pitches. Last year's was not one of my better games." Busby's 1973 gem came against the Detroit Tigers In late April. He followed that up in his next start by keeping Milwaukee hitless for 5 1-3 innings before getting wild and struggling to a 5-3 win. Busby remembered at that time and again Wednesday that it was Brewers Manager Del Crandall who had played a role in his formative baseball years. Both are from Fullerton,Calif., and Busby, as a youngster closely followed Crandall's career with the then Milwaukee Braves. When Busby was 9, he attended a clinic conducted in Fullerton by Crandall. "I don't guess he remembers me, though," Busby said. Crandall hadn't, and it wasn't until last year that he remembered the clinic. McKeon managed Busby inj the minor leagues at Omaha,' Neb., and he recalled that after a near no-hltter there, "I said there was no doubt in my mind] that he would pitch a couple. I| said It wouldn't be there, but in the majors." McKeon isn't the only one who recognized Busby's no-hlt abilities. Busby's roommate, pitcher Paul Splittorf, had tossed a two-hitter at the Brewers Tuesday and afterward he was asked about the possibility of.a around the corners," Splfitottl no-hlt game. said. "Steve's the type <rf,gay> "I don't expect to pitch a no- who can pitch a no-hitter any^ hitter because I have to stay time." "' Green Visits Bay Point Hubert Green, one of the most successful golfers on the current tour, will arrive here tonight to spend a week at Bay Point, which he represents on the tour. Green will team up Saturday with Billy Key of Columbus, Ga, former Western amateur, Southeastern and Georgia state golf champion, in an 18-hole match against Bay Point pro> Howell Fraser and Jimrhy Gabrielson of Atlanta, who? recently reached the finals'* of J the British amateur champion'-;* ^hip tournament. Saturday's match will start at 4 'lp.m. ..•••^ Tennis matches and other v, events are scheduled during Green's stay. for TfMtTH IOI now at THOMPSON' 6 E. 4TH ST. DOWNTOWN 785 0234 Boxing Future In Doubt In Madison Square Garden NEW YORK (UPI) - Madl son Square Garden and boxing may no longer be synonymous a year from now. Garden officials made It clear Thursday that unless an equitable N.Y. State Income tax structure Is worked out, It can no longer compete fairly with other boxing centers for major events, and without major events there Is no way the Garden can operate boxing profitably. The Garden had expected tax relief after the state legislature had passed a bill exempting non-resident fighter's revenue generated by TV outside of the state from Income taxes, but Gov. Malcolm Wilson startled the Garden by vetoing the measure the very day of the Jerry Quarry-Joe Frazler bout. Alan N. Cohen, president and chief executive officer of the Garden corporation, admitted under extensive questioning that while he didn't mean It as a threat to the state, nevertheless "at the gloomiest, I would have to say there is a good chance we would discontinue our boxing efforts. Unless we can hold the big fights we can't go on. And boxing is only profitable on the big time." Cohen said the Garden would have to take a long look at the boxing picture "a year from now" and see if the operation was even marginally profitable. Walker Signs CLEVELAND (UPI) Cleveland Cavaliers' general manager-coach Bill Fitch announced Thursday the signing of "phenomenally quick" Clarence (Foots) Walker, a 6-foot-1 guard who led West Georgia to the NAIA tournament last spring. Cohen said that Teddy Brenner, president of the Garden's boxing department, would continue to pursue the big ones, and. even as Cohen spoke Tito Lectoure, manager of Carlos Mon* zon, was In Brenner's office for preliminary discussions of a bout between the middleweight champion and Rodrlgo Valdes. Brenner had hoped to put together a double-header card featuring Monzon-Valdes and lightweight champion Roberto Duran against Ken Buchanan. All four are non-residents of New York State, of course, and will resist fighting in the Garden if income taxes are prohibitive. The tax bite has been plaguing the Garden for the past few years, and it firmly beleives that that bite lost all chance to stage the George Foreman-Joe Frazler fight and the September clash of Foreman and Muhammad Ali. The first Frazier-AH bout in March of 1971 saw the purses of both men held up while the state sought to collect $350,000 from each man. Long negotiation saw the state yield by cutting its demand by about $70,000 for each. The second Ali-Frazier bout in January was made possible by a pre-fight agreement bet ween the parties that nonNew York revenue would not be taxed, and the same sort of pact made the Quarry-Frazier mat' ch possible. But to go through special arrangements for each major event, the Garden contends, seriously impedes it in all negotiations, making it easier for rival promoters in other states or countries to nail down a match quickly since no such tax problems prevail. we give you the works FOR ONLY $79.95 For the man who wants the most'but of life—Saturday morning drag racer, Sunday afternoon pilot, T.V. quarterback-here's the Super Chronomaster by Croton. It's a stop watch, tachometer, time-zone watch, yachting timer, skin diver's-aviator's-doctor's watch. And a great watch. 560-62 Harrison Ave. Phon« 769-1456 Sale! Save on Radial 36,000 **» on a real . Built with 4 rayon belts and two tough polyester plies (or traction, strength, and durability. Hurry in . sale ends Saturday! Sale Prices Good Thru Saturday Sears Highway Passenger Tire Guarantee If you do not receive the number of miles specified because of your tire becoming unserviceable due to (1) defects, (2) normal road hazards, or (3) tread wear-out, We will: At our option, exchange it for a new tire or give you a refund charging in either case only the pro- g wtion of the then current selling price DIUB Federal xcise tax that represents mileage used. If the tire is unserviceable due to any of the above causes before 10% of the guaranteed mileage is received, the replacement or refund will be made with no charge for mileage received. Nail punctures will be repaired at no charge. Guarantee applies to tires on vehicles used for private family purposes. Use Sears Easy Payment Plan FREE Mounting and Rotation Seara Auto Air Conditioner Guarantee For the period ol time or the number ol miles ol car operation specified, whichever occurs first, upon return, we will repair the alr"tonditloner, tree ol charge, II detective In material or workmanship. Sale! Save $30.95 Auto Air Conditioner Guaranteed 24 Months Or 24,000 Miles . . . Enjoy cool driving comfort in your car . •. even on hottest days. At this low price, why wait? Air conditioners available for American- made cars, pickups, jinpgrts. Regular $239.95 *209 SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back 42 Month Guaranteed Sears Battery *3i.95 2() 88 SAVE Regular With Trade-Ip with Trade -in Here's a tine replacement battery for cars that need reserve power for easy starting, summer air conditioners and other accessories. Sizes to fit most cars. Ri-pMceil FHEE 'I 'I 1 I Ijilb lnbl.illi.-il FREE ,1 St-.io Iflbt .lllL'd il Save $3.02 I Sears Heavy Duty Shock Absorbers Guaranteed For As Long As You Own Your Car. Reg. 87.99 4 97 EACH These heavy duty shocks give you 40% more ride- control area than original - equipment shocks. They help eliminate excessive sway and bounce. Sizes to fit most cars. InsUllatioa Available • ••„»'•• - .,f Sears DOWNTOWN PANAMA CITY 763-0771 SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. Tire and Auto Center. 24-Hr. Catalog Sales Service Dial 785-1551 .•I *: t

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