The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 27, 1953 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, May 27, 1953
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Page 6
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PAGE SIX BLYTHETILLE (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS WEDNESDAY. MAY VI. 1958 OSCEOLA NEWS Dr. William. Sheddan Convinced 'Country Doctor Born, Not Made Being a successful doctor in the small town where you wore born and grew tip is out of the ordinary and old timers predicted it couldn't happen, but Dr. Billy Sheddan defeated that old Belief when, at the age of 22, he had graduated from medical college and displayed his first professional sign, "William J. Sheddan, M. D." That may have thrown « few of the non-believers off the track, but not for long. You see, "Dr. Billy" got first-hand experiences a long, long time before he finished nigh school in Osceola. One of Osceola's most beloved old doctors, Dr. H. C. Dunavant took Dr. Billy under his wing when he found he was interested in becoming a doctor and took him out in the country to make calls on Saturdays Sundays, and after school. "These experiences," Dr. Billy said, "beat anything that could be found in textbooks so if, as you say, I am a success, I can thank old Dr. Dunavant, who was a good surgeon as well as a pill-roller. "Good roads were something not dreamed about back in those days and if an operation was necessary, he performed it in the patient's kitchen. And believe it or not," Dr. Billy said, "he never lost a patient from not being skilled for the job. "The first appendix operation I ever heard about happened one hot August day on Baker Turner's farm. Dr. Dunavant and I drove out in his old all-weather buggy and when we got there, the Negro was found to have appendicitis. "Those who remember the old doctor, know he always wore frock-tail coat, summer or winter and he stood several inches ove.- six feet. When he got in a hurry, that coat tail really took off," smiled Dr. Billy. account for my dally wagti which was one quarter. I worked six days a week, all summer, when I told my dad he was paying the Negro hands a dollar a day and they only *wk-. ed five and one-half days, he told me, 'yes but they didn't try to burn down the school.' STARR GAZING "I KNEW BY that familiar sign we had work -to do and fast. The Negro's wife was the only one in the house and he had her boiling water and tearing up rags. He told me to grab the kitchen table and take it out under a little peach tree In the yard. He helped me bring out the old sewing machine to make hifi make-shift operating table long enough to lay the man on. While I was handing him his instruments, tnd administering the chloroform the woman fanned away the flies. "We drove back to see the Negro everyday. On the seventh day, he was sitting at the kitchen tabl eating watermelon when we went i and had never even had a rise o ... Dr. William I. Sheddan . . . house calls by steam boat . . . temperature. "The old doctor was a wizard at amputating arms and legs and performing brain surgery. My good friend Tal Tongate and I were his assistants. Tal wasn't too keen ,on being there but when two teen-age boys run together, it's natural they don't want the other one to think they're a chicken and to prove that, Tal went Into farming and ginning," Dr. Billy said. "My parents," continued Dr. Billy, "thought I was headed for the reform school when I was about 12 or 13. I got expelled from ichool for burning down an out-door school toilet. When I came home and told my dad what had happened he had me to hitch up his buggy and we drove back put to school and When I got out he took his buggy whip and really tanned my hide .then made me apologize before the whole school. "I thought that the thing was settled but when school was out the first part of June. I had to work on our farm to help build back another toilet. I was assigned an old gray mule that I had to put the gear on every morning whether he was to be worked or not, Just to keep in practice. I was given credit on my "FROM THAT day to this, I have never wanted to run to a fire ant my clinic is two doors from the fire house which serves me as a general reminder." Dr. Billy took a course in medi cine at Kentucky Military Institute in Lyndon, Ky., and In 1911 was awarded a beautiful gold medal fo» making the highest grade In physiology. The medal, still in mint condition, was presented to him by Dr. Netherland, whom a lot of oUJ timers attended KMI will remember. Dr. Billy interned at St. Joseph Hospital in Memphis, under doctors such as Dr. Battle Malong. Dr. Prank Smythe, Sr., Dr. J. L. McGehee. Dr. E. E. Francis, who was af- _fectionately called "Daddy Francis, 1 ' 'and Dr. W. B. Rogers. Dr. Billy was graduated from University of Tennessee June 4, 1915. He then Interned at St. Joseph Hospital in Memphis. One of the young internees in his class was Dr. N. B. Ellis, where the two were to become life-long friends. After Dr. Billy completed his training, he came back home to practice. He kept up a correspondence with young Dr. Ellis who had gone tO| Oklahoma with the Idea of practicing in a God-forsaken place by the name of Pawhuska. "There was a great need for a doctor at kelser so I had Dr. Ellis visit me and talked him right into taking up 'gum-boating practice' because back then, there was no roads leading in or out of Keiser. He took me up on the proposition and stayed there five years before he went to Wilson. "World War I came along, he was loaned by Uncle Sam to Britain as so many of their doctors were killed. I volunteered and was made a first lieutenant In the medical corps for overseas duty. Back In World'War I," continued Dr. Billy, "first lieutenant was a high rating and I was satisfied not to be a general anyway." For heaven's sake either get your American flag cleaned before you display It Saturday or just don't. This holiday, Memorial Day .above all others should merit > clean flag with no shreds. There is no federal law regulating the display of the flag except the one forbldlng Its use in any trademark. Certain observances, established by custom, are approved by the adjutant General's office. An inverted flag is a signal of distress, not of celebration. The flag should always be hung flat from a flag pole with the star section to the north or east. There should never be an emblem or object placed above or upon it. Our flag Isn't merely pieces of red, white and blue bunting but It is a symbol of what we stand for, therefore It should be given a good going over before we display it. I suggest the Boy Scouts call the attention to any merchant who is un- thoughtful enough not to abide by the regulations. It was a common saying among the Puritans, "Brown bread and the Gospel ifi good fare." It has been said we are not hypocrites in our sleep. The diplomat sits in silence, watching the world with his ears instead of his eyes. Settlement of Iowa began on June 1, 120 years ago. I don't believe warts are as popular with kids now-a-days as they were when I was young. I can remember when just about ever? kid in town had 'em. This changing world! Maybe there aren't as many frogs either. HIS SERVICE career began at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. From there to Washington, D. C., New York, and Hoboken for advanced training. At Hoboken, he was assigned to a transport as transport surgeon, car- rylngtroops to France. "My ship wns USACT Eagle. Twice, In the six months I had to go oer, we had steering trouble and had to fall out of the convoy. On both occasions, the ships that took our position were torpedoed." Dr. Billy said, "On my last trip across the pond, we left France on Feb. 7 and it took us until Mar. 21 to reach Newport News, Va. I made friends with a Quaker while we were See DR. WILLIAM on Page 1 If you are a believer In simple home remedies, here's one I'll pass on to you an old Negro told me about a few days ago: If you'll chew a mouthful of poison ivy, you'll be immune for the rest of your life. Scared to try it? Me too. If you're distressed over your iris rotting due to so many rains, try cutting the Milage back to three or four inches. An old seafaring captain shouted down to the crew's quarters below decks, "Is there a Mackintosh down there big enough to keep two young ladies warm?" "No sir," shouted back the young deck swabber, "but there's a MacPherson who's willing to try." •Wives are young men's mistresses, companions for the middle age, and old men's nurses. There are two things to aim at Get a New PHILCO AIR CONDITIONER • For HOMES • For OFFICES • For STORES *Beat the heat" . . . enjoy cool comfort in the hottest, muggiest weather . . . «nd healthful ventilation alt year 'round! Models to fit any window . . . any room! Why delay... get rour Phiico Air Conditioner todavl KJ KJ sO Ul HUBBARD AND SON FURNITURE Phone 4409 Blythevllle AN ECONOMICAL NEW KIND OF CAR! With the HUDSON you can outperform any other c in the lowest-price field! ^' ^ ^' Wy ,^ ^ CALL IT A CHALLENGE IF YOU WANT T0-Bl»r /7'S A FACT/ Becaus* it't wonderfully compact, it's a delight to handle, drive and park in today's traffic . . i and there's ample room for six. Wo don't ask you to take our word for what this compact new kind of car will do. Because on any road, street, hill or highway you select, we'll outperform and outdemonstrate any other make of car in the lowest-price field. What's more, this compact companion.of the fabulous Hudson Hornet wili do it with less gas, oil, tire wear and maintenance than any of them! You think that's a powerful statement? You're right! But the Hudson Jet is the most powerful performer you've ever seen! GIVE US 15 MINUTES AND WE'LL PROVE IT! trim anrf nthnr nrwlfirflllnni! nnd nrriworlcfl rl, to rhnnpn wiftionl VEACH HUDSON SALES Walnut & N. Franklin Blythtville, Ark. GOOD DRIVERS DRIVE SAFR CARS . . . CHECK YOUR CAR in life: first, to get what you wan and after that, to enjoy It. Only the wisest of mankind achieve the second, Women are wiser than men because they know less—according to men—and understand more. Some people believe that success depends on luck and pluck- luck In finding somebody to pluck. The biggest trouble I find with Memphis is it's too convenient to everything I can't afford. All art is just an imitation of nature. Chrysanthemums are Japan's national flower, that we all know, but did you know they have grown there for 2,000 years? The Japanese Order of the Chrysanthemum, an honor rarely conferred, was founded in 1877, I hate to bring up anything unpleasant, but our month of rains is a good indicator for a June rise. Those cotton choppin* geese are living the life of a Florida tourist. Just eatln' and swimmin'! The next time you want to spank junior for tracking up your highly polished floors, or throws a ball through your beautiful picture window, think of five year old Freddie Thomason of Magnolia, Ark. who See STAR GAZING on Page 7 Get More For Your Money! New lower prices save you plenty on DODGE WRafoTVHon PICK-UPS EASY TERMS! • PROMPT DELIVERY! * HIGH TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE! BIG LOAD CAPACITY...31.23 eu .ft. POWER-PACKED ENGINES... <, rorinMo-go 100 h. P . SHORT TURNING DIAMETER... 36'/,-n. drd.. ForaREAL PHI, JM wpA«n» YovrFriMtUyDODGlDfALCK Over 140 Brand New Patterns, including Solids and Prints. Wallpaper for Every Room In your home! LIVING ROOM You can't afford to past op thi« splendid chance to paper your living room from an outstanding selection of high-grade wallpapers at these money-saving, group prices. DINING ROOM Beautiful papers from our Decorator line. 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