The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan on September 8, 1939 · Page 10
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan · Page 10

Publication:
Location:
Ludington, Michigan
Issue Date:
Friday, September 8, 1939
Page:
Page 10
Start Free Trial
Cancel

THE DAILY NEWS—LUD1NGTON, (MICHIGAN. FRIDAY, SEPT. 8, 1939. ole Field Gridiron Lights Are Approved ^i^ i JL A II IN PUCE I ! i Self-Liquidating Plan of Fin- arteirtjj Is \\ked in Ob- talnlhg Equipment Ofcole tfeM. will be lighted for nlgHt fbttb&li games this fall, •welcome Thews for many LUd- ington footbdll fans. W 1 ' Jf Wtueckler, president Of the Ludinfeton school board, an- nouriced -this morning that the order for thie lights and other necelsarV edUTpment was placed Thursday, 'following a recent meeting of the school board. ; The ecniipment is expected to arrive "in time to be set up and ready for use in the first home frame of -the season against Icottvillei Friday night, Sept. 29. •; Mr MuecKier pointed out that the lights are being installed as 6, self-liquidating project, same a& the lights used for softball games at Oriole field this summer. '• Decision t» purchase the lights Vas somewhat prompted by the report of the Lualriglbri Retrea- tional council oh success of the (Softball lights, v ...... The report, subthitted at a recent meet, revealed that , the lights were'Completely; p&id for in the short While they 1 were in »se and therS was> in addition, a small balance 1 'on Sand to start next, season. Further specifications, arid details .concerning the rifiw lighting plant will be an'noUhced ; later. Installation df lights will necessitate revamping of the Oriole Jour-game.irprne .schedule.; Originally scfiecfuled for Saturday Sternoons, the games will instead be played Friday nights. After the opener agdinst jScottville, Mariistee will play here the rflght of Oct. 6 wife Petoskey, new addltlbn to the Oriole sclied- ule, ifflfrHfeifefe °fi &«. 13 - Cjid - illac's ViKmgs will wind up the R6me schedule with a game on the night.'ot Oct. 27. With the present set-up, it is likely that five of the seven games on the Oriole schedule will fee playedf-fifider the lamps, War at home antf one a t Traverse City. Joe McCarthy Convinced His N. Y. Yankees Are In the defending champions from Alameda, Calif., whose arrival was delayed. By JUDSON BAILEY (Associated Press Sports Writer) It took all summer to do it, but Marse Joe McCarthy finally is convinced his New York Yankees are a shoo-in for their fourth consecutive American league pennant. With a i6'/ 2 game lead over the second place Boston Red Sox, the Yanks are due to clinch their championship within a few days. The signal that McCarthy had conceded himself the flag, after manfully resisting all ;hese weeks, came Thursday as an echo of New York's 5-2 conquest of the Red Sox. The bland 'boss of the Bronx Bombers showed newspapermen pocketful of clippings he had collected for the purpose of taunting Clark (Old Fox) Griffith of the Washington Sena;ors, the Yankee's leading heckler. Reports Record Griff said we'd fold in August," mused McCarthy, "but these will help him remember that's when we gained our most ground. We won 15 out of 16 ?ames in one stretch and in four trips west this season we won 35 out of 44 games." With Rookie Ted Williams out of the lineup because of a bruised hand, the Red Sox were held to three hits by Monte Pearson and Oral Hildebrand and Only got their two runs when Pearson went wild in the fourth and walked four men. Joe DiMaggio again led the 11-hit Yankee assault with his 27th home fun and a single. Unlike the smooth-rolling Yanks, the Cincinnati Reds again were quavering in front of the National league. and finally gave the game to St. Louis when Pitcher Bill Lee made a three-base boner on Enos (Country) Slaughter's bounder in the tenth. The Boston Bees turned the tables on the New York Giants 4-3, coming from 'behind in the ninth with four hits off Carl Hubbell and an error by Harry Banning. The Brooklyn Dodgers and Phillies were idle. The Chicago White Sox swept their St. Louis stand with a double battering of the Browns, 8-4 and 11-4, to reduce the distance to second place in the American league to two games. Five-hit pitching .by Ken Chase brought the Washington Senators a 10-1 victory over the Philadelphia Athletics and the Cleveland Indians captured a slugfest from the Detroit Tigers, 9-8. Hank Greenberg hit his 26th and 27th home runs and Roy Cullenbine got another for the Tigers, but Hal Trosky offset these to good effect with four hits, including his 24th circuit clout. Local Boxers Reach Finals In Han Meet All-Day at Event Will Be Scottville Gun Club Held HART,; SSpt. 8. — Scottville Merchants, playing in the Oceana County Fair Jja'se'bftH totir- nament, defeated the home Hart team Thursday toy a score of 5-3. The Scpttville team, behind the hurliffg of Button find Rich, held the,; edge over Hart through fthe entire game, mak- ing'two runs in the first inning, two in the" third and one' hi the fifth while the home crew was making one in the fourth arid two in the fifth. Two smart double-plays were pulled off toy the Scottville cre^y, the' first from Rummer .to 6choenherr *° Kcifer an d the second from Emms to Schoen- herr'to Keifer. Robinson walloped the"'pnly extra-base hit of the feame, that a double. The Scottville team was made up of Schoenherr, R&tbbun, Robinson, Rich, Rummer, Kelf- jer, Emms, Nutt, Button and Beadle. For the fourth time in three days they were forced into tra innings Thursday, and finally dropped an 8-7 eleven-indecision, to the Pittsburgh Pirates. Big Ernie Lombard! got two home runs and a single for the lost cause, but the Reds were outhit 15-6. Cincinnati's defeat, coupled with the St. Louis Cardinals' 4-2 10-inning victory over the Chicago Cubs, cut the margin between first and second place to 4V 2 games. Cubs Lose Game Spoiling ceremonies marking Manager Gabby Hartnett's catching of his 1,727th game for an all-time major league record, the Cubs made four errors Several local boxers-will participate in the finals of the Oceana County fair boxing show this evening, having taken victories in the first two Local boxers taking part in bouts this evening will be Karl Borg and Don Cluchey of Smith's Recreations and Bob Smith and Ellsworth Anderson of Western Michigan Fair as" S °The results of fights at Hart on Wednesday and Thursday evening are: Thursday Forrest Gerling, Muskegon, won from Bob Smith, Ludington. ,. , George McCoy, Ludington, won from John Crampton, Hesperia. Bob Smith, Ludington, SCOTTVILLE, Sept. 8. — Scottville Gun club will hold its second registered skeet shoot of the year at the club Sunday, Sept. 10. The event, to last during the entire day. is expected, as in the past, to draw many artists of the shooting iron to Scottville. Shooting is opened to experts and amateurs alike, with prizes available to both classes. The shooting will be held at the club grounds one and a half miles west of Scottville on US-10-31. The grounds, developed into one of the , finest shooting areas in the state, is popular with out-of-county shooters, many of whom have visited the city on previous occasions. Adequate parking is available to visitors, many of whom will undoubtedly attend the meet. Lunch will'be served at noon, with shooting halted but a short time at that time. A second event, planned by the club, will be held Sept. 24 in the form of a Hunter's shoot. This event will be an all-amateur contest, details of which will be announced later. Pitt Gridders Are Chief Sufferers as Pro Players Win, 10-0 (Bv WHITNEY MARTIN) NEW YORK, Sept. 8.—(/P)— The New York Giants, national pro football league champions, today claimed the championship of Pittsburgh and points least, but mostly Pittsburgh, as i a result of their 10 to 0 victory over an eastern all-star Thursday night. Nine members of his 1938 Pittsburgh eleven were sent on the field by Jock Sutherland to do battle against the pro titleholders. and although they were aided and abetted by some 25 stars of other eastern elevens, and put up a stirring battle that thrilled the 38,667 42-yard line .and featured a squirming off-tackle cutback by Leemans good for 28 yards. hKen Strong place kicked the ' extra point. In the third period Strong dropped back to the All-Star 28-yard line and from a sharp angle place kicked the ball through the uprights. That was the scoring, but it wasn't the story of the game. The story was the golden chances which slipped through the fingers of both teams; the ipasses which just missed, the stubborn line play, the vicious tackling. And when the smoke of battle had cleared, the names of Tuffy Leemans, Ed Danowski and Ken Strong on the winning side, and Columbia's Sid Luckman and Dartmouth's Bob MacLeod of the All-Stars were on the tongues of the fans. Intercept Passes Three intercepted passes I wrecked as many threats of I the All-Stars, one of the inter. jceptions, by Johnny Dell Isola, eleven setting the stage for Strong's place kick. I Sutherland Had said he would take to the air to gain j ground, and he was true to his iword. Thirteen times ah All;Star back, usually Luckman, ! tossed the ball, but the Giant I aerial defense was alert and I only six of the tosses were completed. The Giants' clicked piled up 10 first downs to seven for the Giants, but the yardaige from rushing was approximately the same. Tne Stars had a 20-yard edge in passing yardage. Wes Ramey Wins Fight in Texas DALLAS, Tex., Sept. 9.— (ff)— Wesley Ramey, Grand Rapids lightweight, outpointed Joe Boscarino, of Rochester, N. Y., Thursday night in their ten- round bout here. It was their third match. Previously Ramey had been knocked out and had won a decision. Boscarino had Ramey in danger in the seventh round of Thursday night's battle, but Ramey was slugging it out at the end of the final round. In Justice Court Custer Churches Willis Arrinton, Bitely EAST LANSING, Sept. 8. —Michigan State college football fans may expect another season of forward passes and trick plays, Head Coach Charley Bachman said today. The holes ripped in his backfield by graduation will make no I difference in the style of play, won I he said, adding that he looked fans in the Polo grounds, they i on eis;ht of their 14 attempts, couldn't quite match the punch | Marshall Goldberg, for three of the money players. | years the ace of the Pittsburgh Had Many Chances i team, was pretty Many times opportunity I ered by the Giant knocked for both teams, but | his college running mate. Har- only uvice was it heard. In j old Stebbins, went out with in• • — • i juries early in the thijd quar- ! ter, to be followed on the next 1 play by Bill Daddio, star Panther end. There was little to choose in the second period Chuck Gelatka snared a pass from Tuffy Leemans on the all-star one-yard line and stepped over the 'goal to climax a drive which started at the All-Star After having; demanded examination when arraigned before Justice Lester Blodgett on Sept. 2 on a charge of passing a forced check, Henry Allen, 39, Benton Harbor, instead, waived examination when brought before Justice Blodgett Wednesday morning, date set for examination. Allen was placed under $1,000 bond which was not furnished and bound over to the October well smoth- j term of circuit court. He is be- linemen, and | ing held at the county jail. Allen was arrested on the morning of Sept. 2 on a charge of pasing a forged check to a Ludington merchant. ST MARY'S AND MISSIONS (Rev. Wm. Veisnoraitis, rector) Round Lake: Mass—8 a. m. Custer: Mass—10:30 a. m. CONGREGATIONAL (F. Clements, Superintendent) Sunday school—10 a. m. CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN (Rev. L. H. Prowant, pastor) Sunday school—10 a. m. Preaching—11 a. m. FREE METHODIST (Rev. R. Calkins, pastor) Sunday school—2 p. m. Preaching—3 p. m. Morton School Miss Emily Goos has returned home after helping her aunt, Mrs. John Adams, of Pentwater, the past four weeks. Mrs. Adams recently suffered a broken ankle. MJss Thressa Brye returned home Sunday, Sept. 3, from Chicago. She was accompanied by her brother-in-law and sister, Dr. and Mrs. Carl Jockim. Mr. and Mrs. Elon Morton, son, Nevin, and daughter, Nancy, were Sunday dinner guests, Sept. 3, at the Stanley Morton home. the statistics. The All-Stars Dr. John B. Ellis published an expose of Communism in the United States back in 1870. the ! Nevin Morton remained to spend a few days. School began Tuesday, Sept. 5. Last week work was being donated on the new school ground. Jack and Margaret Lauber were guests Sunday afternoon, Sept. 3, of Jack and Emily Goos. Everett Nelson was a week-end guest, Sept. 2 and 3, of Jack Goos. Miss Arlene Cutler went to Muskegon Tuesday, Sept. 5, where she will take a business course. STATE OF MICHIGAN STATE TAX COMMISSION LANSING September, 7, 1939. State Board of Equalization. Lansing, Michigan. loslon ..: 76 Chicago 75 Cleveland 69 Setroit 69 Washington 59 Philadelphia 45 St. Louis 35 Thursday's Results Cleveland 9, Detroit 8. New York 5, Boston 2. Washington 10. Philadelphia 1 Chicago 8-11. St. Louis 4-4. Games Today Cleveland at St. Louts. Washington at Philadelphia. Boston at New York. Only games scheduled. Major League Leaders . (By THE ASSOCIATED PREBif) NATIONAL LEAGUE . Batting— Mlze, Bt. Louis. .363; Arno- ylch, PhTlaflelphla, .333. Runa— Hack, Chicago, 93; Herman, Chicago, 91. . Buna batted in — McCormlck, Cincinnati, '103; Uedwlck and Mlze, St. Louis, W. '• Hits — McCormlck. Cincinnati, 172; Mlze. St. Louis, 168. .Double* — Slaughter, St. Louis, 40; Mlae. Bt. Louis, 37. Trf|tti8--Hcrman, Chicago. 14; Vaugh•n, Pittsburgh, and Goodman. Cincinnati. 14 ..... . 'Borne runs— Ott, New York, 27; Mlze, 6: Louie, and Camlllt. Brooklyn, 24. •Stolen bascB-^HandJey, Pittsburgh, 18; Hack, Chicago, 14. J?ltebj Wy»U. * go, . i-t>Srrtnger, • Cincinnati'. • 19-7: klyn, fl-3. ,' , . , AMERICAN LEAGUE New York. .407; .. oxx, Boston, 131; Rolfe, New tied in— Williams, Boston, 126; ijrtbr NOW York. 119. »— Rolfe. New York, 184; McOosky New AMERICAN LEAGUE W. L. York 93 38 Pet. .710 .585 .561 .535 .527 .447 .349 .273 NATIONAL LEAGUE W. L. Cincinnati ............... 76 49 St. Louis ................ 72 54 Chicago .................. 71 60 New York ................ 65 60 Brooklyn ................. 65 60 Pittsburgh ............... 59 67 Boston ................... 57 70 Philadelphia ... ............. 40 85 Thursday's Results Boston 4. New York 3. Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 7 (11 nlngs). St. Louis 4. Chicago 2 (10 Innings). Only games scheduled. Games Today New York at Boston. Philadelphia at Brooklyn (2). Cincinnati at Pittsburgh. St. Louis at Chicago. Pet. .608 .571 .542 .520 .520 .468 .449 .320 over CCC. Al Kirchenbauer, Muskegon, over Cliff Gallagher, Ludington. Friday Karl~Borg, fcndington, over Fred Craft, Bitely CCC. Ellsworth Anderson. Ludington, over James Lyons,..Bitely. Bob Smith, Ludington, over John Wilson, Bitely. G. Perkins, Muskegon, over George McCoy, Ludington. National Softball Tourney Is Started CHICAGO, Sept. 8.— (ff)— Heavy firing opened today over six diamonds as the National Softball tournament sought to complete a round of 60 games away to an Thursday night when both .games on the opening card ended in no-hit contests. The Pohlar cafe of Cincinnati, defending men's cham- ,pions, defeated Park Ridge, 111., 4 to 2 as Clyde Kirkendall hurled hitless ball. Three errors helped Park Ridge score its runs in the first inning. Another error, coming in the •ninth with two on base, led to three Cincinnati runs and cost Park Ridge the game, in-! Jerry Joyce, pitching for the Erin Brews girls team of Cleveland, fanned 19 batters in hurling a no-run no-hit 2 to 0 triumph against the Dr. Peppers of Miami Beach, Fla. The Cleveland girls substituted for for big things from Jerry Drake, understudy to the ail-American forward passing Johnny Pingel. Drake already has a stranglehold on the left halfback No. 1 position. Bachman brought two full teams to the campus today, preparing for Saturday's annual rules interpretation demonstration for some 300 high school coaches. Monday the pre-season training grind will start in earnest, with 65 players invited to turn out. Before the Spartans lies a gruelling season of nine games that will take them west toj San Francisco and east to Syra- i cuse, N. Y. i Drake gained favor In his] coaches' eyes when they] learned that he has devoted hisi annual event ! summer to target practice at: auspicious start I punting. He set up a couple of, Gentlemen: In accordance with the requirements of law. we are submitting to you herewith the estimated valuation of county in the state, as determined by this department, together with other statistical matters relating thereto. Very truly yours, STATE TAX COMMISSION, Melville It. McPhersan, Chairman. John W. Libckc, Commissioner. Alvin E. Richards, Commissioner. each County 1938 Total Asspsscd Valuation tires in a field near the college campus and practiced; marksmanship, hoping to de- l velop into the triple threat thatj made Pingle such a menace. He is a shifty runner, but last yearj was ranked among the little- used reserves. Bachman faces a season with and experienced line and a green I backfield. Eddie Pearce, of' Flint, a right halfback, is the only regular of past years left him, and Bachman is casting about for sophomore talent to fill in the gaps. The sound of artillery fire which is clearly audible 200 miles away, often cannot be heard 100 miles away. New York, 4i: wu- .ABocton, 39. ileV— Lewla. Washington. IS: Me- p«trolt. 13. runi — Foxx, Boiton, 35; Qreen- ilt, and DiMaggio, New York, ,»W, Nbw York. 20-5. Washington, York, 50; 13-2; »» »j BOXING IE ASSOCIATED PBB88) -Wwley tyuney. 135, Grand outpointed Joe Bo»car•ter. N. Y., (10). wv—Pedro Montanez 142, <me»ted Vlnce Plmplnella, What Will 1940 Bring? The 1940 party nominating conventions are not far distant. Already the political pot is boiling. Favorite sons, dark horses and*other aspirants are being groomed for the important presid»en- tial nominations and election race. YOU need to know the facts. W. B. Ragsdale, veteran member of The Associated Press Washington staff, is making a tour of tlie country to analyze the tangled political situation and to interpret for YOU the many forces now at work in the significant maneuvering of this prfc-convdntion year. Watch for his series of articles in THE LUDINGTON DAILY NEWS ALCONA ALGER ALLEGAN ALPENA ANTRIM ARENAC BARAGA BARRY BAY BKNZ1E BERRIEN BRANCH CALHOUN CASS CHARLEVOIX CIIEBOYGAN CHIPPEWA CLARE CLINTON CRAWFORD DELTA DICKINSON EATON E.MMETT GENESEE GLADWIN GOGEBIC GRAND TRAVERSE. GllATIOT HiLLSDALE HOUGHTON HURON INGHAM IONIA IOSCO LUON ISABELLA JACKSON KALAMAZOO KALKASKA KENT KEWEENAW LAKE LA PEER LEELANAU LENA WEE LIVINGSTON LUCE \IACKINAC MACOMB . . MANISTEE . MARQUETTE MASON . . . . MECOSTA MENOMINEE MIDLAND . MISSAUKEE MONROE .. . MONTCALM MONTMORENCY MUSKEGON .... NEWAYGO OAKLAND OCEANA OGEMAW ONTONAGON .. OSCEOLA OSCODA OTSEGO OTTAWA PRESOUE ISLE ROSCOMMON . SAGINAW SANILAC SCHOOLCRAFT SlltAWASSEE ., ST. CLAIR ST. JOSEPH . • • TUSCOLA VAN BUREN .. WASHTENAW . WAYNE WEXFORD .... TOTAL 3,995,910 6,836,425 37.422,699 16,558,418 6,024,585 5,457,940 7,544,600 19,684,374 64,930,490 4,434,358 75,475,105 22,319,507 89,900,970 18,339,690 8,435,145 6,877,684 21,$38,532 5,186,834 23,514,943 2,731,345 16,165,445 16,451,364 28,587,476 12,477.600 237,173,175 6,180,990 37,643,804 15,652,925 29,885,112 23,467,606 18,917,697 27,493,559 148,263,382 27,722,735 7,921,050 21,321,670 19,321,148 99,667,805 116,058,720 2,464,435 255,538,678 3,688,077 2,468,800 23,795,459 5,784,964 50,222,386 23,630,353 5,494,455 6,102,572 83,962,910 12,905,796 52,648,661 14,896,780 11,776,848 18,968,563 23,804,770 3,405,420 63,739,250 24,851,032 2,213,415 82,320,362 14,238,881 222,940,130 10,477,963 5,258,462 8,357,120 7,721,620 2,141,199 3,419,835 45,525,706 8,769,335 2,887,373 135,199,539 22,973,058 6,965,305 27,196,905 90,480,548 28,547,655 24,556,045 29,142,705 85,154,350 3,124,615,428 10,268,717 1930 Total Assrssod Valuation 4,072,445 6,821.875 37.8G8.692 16,641,324 6,063,670 5.554,794 7.390,425 19,728,927 65,86(i,J>97 4,399.305 76,410,324 22,475,509 91.400.285 18,486,333 8,461,965 G.901,788 22,030,300 5,602.677 23.638,077 2,781,983 16.195,837 16.548,849 28,630,861 12,60-4,595 240,449,651 6,204,361 37,421,008 15,066,469 30.234,483 23,548,425 18,238,261 27,739,814 144,952,414 27,782,418 8,115,245 21,425,830 19.957,744 100,729,910 117,303,400 2,455,914 256,177,701 3,443,230 2,493,580 23,996,568 5,692,259 50.471,455 23,762.274 5,508,295 0,053,015 80,438,705 12,941,615 53,465,983 14.537.049 11,038,734 18,793,920 24,454,837 3,429,152 62,904,889 25,135,133 2,223,694 84,766,327 14,494,675 228,900,421 10,489,628 5,253,162 8,088,766 7,791,410 2,171,898 3,509,220 45,489,875 8,907,320 3,047,203 138,180,176 23,160,845 6,938,435 27,209,310 90,870,758 28,501,120 24,751,475 29,581,818 87,965,455 3,162,917,754 10,436,996 Increase 1939 over 1938 76,535 445,993 82,906 39,085 96,854 44,553 936,507 935,219 156,002 1,499,315 146,643 26,820 24,104 191.768 415,843 123,134 50,638 30,392 97,485 43.385 126,995 3,276,476 23,371 Pecrrasc 1939 under 1938 S 14,550 KqllAll/rd Valuation by Hoard of Supervisors 1919 154,175 35,053 13,544 349,371 80,819 246,255 59,683 194,195 104,160 636,596 1,062,105 1,244,680 639,023 24,780 201,109 222,796 679,436 3,310,968 8,521 244,847 249,069 131,921 13,840 '2,475,795 35,819 817,322 161,886 '650,667 23,732 284,i6i 10,279 2,445,965 255,794 5,960,291 11,665 69,790 30,699 89,385 92,705 49,557 359,731 174,637 334,361 5,300 268,354 137,985 159,830 2,980,637 187,787 \2,405 390,210 195,430 439,113 2,811,105 38,302,326 168,279 $6,055,404,682 ' $6,122,089,325 ' $73,248,870 35,831 26,870 46,535 4,072,445 6,821.875 37.000,000 16,641,324 6,063,670 5,452,476 7,388,000 17.000,000 63,466,057 4.399,305 73,775,901 22,4,68,489 95,000,000 18,500,000 8.871,965 6.P01.788 22,040,300 5,186,888 23,320,378 2,781,983 16,195,837 16,548,849 30,000,000 12,653,095 243,000,000 5,961,214 37,421,008 15,666,469 29,000,000 23,548,425 18,238,261 27,752,325 144,952,414 27,119,522 7,500,000 21,425,830 19,892,714 100,000,000 117,303,400 2,455,914 256,513,161 3,435,385 2,493,580 23,996,568 5,610,000 51,386,153 20,000,000 5.508,295 6,053,015 86,438,705 12,328,103 53,465,983 12,000,000 10,500,000 18,793,926 24,484,837 3,428,942 54,956,936 22,000,000 2,223,694 84,766,327 14,494,675 210,000,000 10,484,628 5,253,162 8,088,766 7,521,950 2,171,899 3,559,220 41,637,295 8,907,320 3.051,936 130,000,000 23,210,845 6,938,435 25,000,000 87,470,806 28,501,120 24,566,350 29,291,758 71,572,865 3,169,885,702 10,436,996 Kquall/rd Valuation by SUte Board of Equalization—1934 Recommended by Stale Ta* Commission— 1839 ?6,564,2»7 I $6,046,217,458 3,454,000 6,337.000 35.762.000 15,401,000 5,381,000 4,849,000 6.252,000 19,571,000 60,079,000 3,817,000 73,677,000 23,006,000 99,181,000 19,872,000 7,991,000 6,408,000 21.811,000 5,104,000 25,662,000 2.285,000 15,983,000 15,943,000 33,104,000 10,858,000 228,653,000 4,604,000 36,456,000 13,242,000 32,149,000 26,118,000 20,445,000 28,764,000 149,307,000 28.727,000 6,807,000 20,856,000 19,766,000 103,042,000 106,100,000 2,000,000 249,200,000 3,992,000 1,793,000 24,250,000 5,478,000 55,980,000 24,447,000 4,991.000 5,390,000 87,037,000 12,016,000 48,497,000 13,029,000 10,212,000 17,719,000 20,394,000 2,707,000 64,524,000 22,267,000 1,983,000 77,551,000 12,911,000 244,401,000 9,785,000 4,473,000 7,687,000 7,244,000 1,700,000 3,308,000 45,986,000 6,744,000 2,046,000 125,951,000 26,627,000 6,507,000 31,880,000 84,486,000 28,908,000 26,028,000 28,057,000 91,381,000 2,853,776,000 ' 10,054,000 $5,762,221,000 3,754,000 6,137,000 37,262,000 16,401,000 5,681,000 5,149,000 6,552,000 19,721.000 65,079,000 4,117,000 75,677.000 23,206.000 100.181,000 19,972,000 8,291.000 6,608,000 22.011,000 5,504,000 25.962,000 2,485,000 15,583,000 15,743.000 33,504,000 11,358,000 240,453,000 5,604,000 36,756,000 14,742.000 32,349.000 25,618,000 19,945,000 29,064,000 146,307,000 28,727,000 7,707,000 20,656,000 20,266,000 101,042,000 112,100,000 2,000,000 256,200,000 3,472,000 1,993,000 24,550,000 5,578,000 56,470,000 24,647,000 5,091,000 5,690,000 90,037,000 12,216,000 53,467,000 13,229,000 10,512,000 18,419,000 24,394,000 2,807,000 63,524,000 23,267,000 2,033,000 82,551,000 13,311,000 240,601,000 9,685,000 4,973,000 7,487,000 7,444,000 1,800,000 3,408,000 46,486,000 7,744,000 2,546,000 136,951,000 26,927,000 6,407,000 31,380,000 89,486,000 28,708,000 26,328,000 28,957,000 91,881,000 2,900,776,000 10,254,000 $5,882,961,000 ' "• ' -V- ', '

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free