Austin American-Statesman from Austin, Texas on May 28, 1973 · 9
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

Austin American-Statesman from Austin, Texas · 9

Publication:
Location:
Austin, Texas
Issue Date:
Monday, May 28, 1973
Page:
9
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Monday, May 28, 197? Auatiit Statesman Austin,' Texas Page 9 THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS ... it tells you how Collectives Scrutinized ! I By JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH . During the past five years, a steadily increasing number of young (and not so young) people in the United States and Canada have become interested Hn cooperatively owning and 'working a chunk of land. t This idea, of course, .is nothing new to the North "American t. Continent. The founders of Zoar (Ohio, 1817), Bethel (Missouri, 1844), Oneida ;(New York, 1848), the Amana Colony (Iowa, 1855), the Cedar Vale Commune (Kansas, 1871) and many similar communities have dreamed variations of the tame dream down through U.S. .and Canadian history, i Unfortunately, all the resulting Utopian societies have failed to live ' up to their founders' ideals and most have long since disappeared. It would reem, then, that today's new 'crop of visionaries will have to Jlcok further afield for "successful models on which to 'base their agrarian collectives ' and communes . . . and they could do no worse than look to Israel for the inspiration they crave. ' Since 1909 - when a group of nine Russians founded the first collective at Degania the Jewish kibbutz movement has grown steadily and the modern State of Israel now boasts about ?50 of the thriving communities, housing a total of approximately 90,000 . people. Although this is only 4 per cent of the Israeli population, kibbutzniks dominate . the political life of the country, make up a disproportionate number of the nation's army officers and are said to have fought longer and harder than any other citizens during the 1967 war. If nothing else, the Israeli collectives breed character. The cooperative settlements also produce more tangible .results When the brand new nation of Israel was created in 1948, its government immediately began an ongoing policy of establishing and aiding the agrarian communities in every possible way. Since then the country't cultivated area has expanded by 150 per cent, its irrigated acreage has been enlarged by a factor of five and its farm production has increased sixfold. The nation' agricultural enterprises (which are , dominated by the collectives) are, in fact, now considered to be among tho most efficient in the world. With farming so well in hand, it's little wonder that the residents of the kibbutzim are now diversifying into various forms of sophisticated, cybernetics - controlled industry. The Israeli kibbutz hps traditionally been organized as true collective based in theory, at least on equality of work, direct democracy and the abolition of private property. Every member, in other words, is required to take a turn at washing dishes and doing other menial tasks, all phases cf communal life are thrashed out during weekly meetings of a settlement's" entire population and all ' except the mosti personal belongings are owned in common. In practice, these rather lofty ideals are becoming increasingly hard for a cooperative's members to live up to. As Israel grows and prospers economically, , her kibbutzniks tend to settle more and more into permanent jobs, to resist the mandatory weekly Another 'Killing' On Car? ATLANTA. Ga. (AP) - The 1934 deluxe Ford in which out laws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were killed is to be sold at auction. Owner Ted Toddy of Atlanta estimates that the car, which cost possibly $1,000 new, has earned about $10 million in fees at exhibits since Bonnie and Clyde were killed by a police ambush near Arcadia, La., May 23, 1934. ; It will be auctioned at the Bay State Antique Automobile Exposition in Princeton, Mass., July 28. , Toddy, a former film produc er, said he bought the car In 1952 for a movie and "found out I had a car that was worth more than the picture." Despite several hundred bul let holes, the car is in virtually mint condition, Toddy said. Postage stamps ' were Introduced in England in 1840, and in the United States in 1847 Eanes Band Concert j At Westlake gatherings and to prefer to own greater number of items individually. Another sore point with many collective members is the way in which kibbutz children are taken from their parents and raised communally. This conflict goes ail the way back to the original settlement at Degania (after the first baby born there was handed over to the community nurse, Degania's second mother refused to follow suit), and has never been resolved. Still other people who've tried the kibbutz way of life have found that although they like the idea of , working for emotional rather than personal financial , rewards . a commune's constant jostling, group ' pressure and lack of privacy is more than they can bear. Predictably enough, then, the shortcomings real or imagined of the kibbutz have inspired a variation: the moshav ovdim, or cooperative village., The first such community was established in 1920 by former kibbutzniks who believed that the family, not the total collective, should i be society's primary unit. Instead of holding land communally, as is done on a k i b b u t z, ,', moshav ovdim members divide their village's acreage equally among themselves after setting aside a central area for community institutions such as a playground, school, day-care center, store, library and meeting hall. Each small landholder is then free to till his plot and raise his family as he sees fit (rather than bowing to a majority decison), although he purchasing of supplies and equipment and the marketing of produce is done collectively. . Yet another variation of communal life was developed in Israel during the 1930s. This is the moshav shitufi and it was expressly designed to combine the best features of the kibbutz and the moshav ovdim. Here, land is owned and farmed collectively as on a kibbutz but the preservation of the individual family unit is stressed nearly as much as on a moshav ovdim. Family Drives Into Tornado KEEFETON, Okla. (AP) Charles Dornan, 43, , his wife and three daughters were in a pickup truck on their way to a storm " shelter at an unused school house when a tornado struck Keefeton on Saturday. I i Their pickup truck . was caught by the tornado and hurled nearly three-quarters of a mile away. , Dornan, his wife Sue, 34, and their daughters, Beverly, 14, and Linda, 11, were killed. Another daughter, Goldie, 17, was critically injured. Rescue workers later dis covered the Dornan home was virtually untouched by the tor- ,nado. The only visible damage was a few missing shingles from the roof. The Department of Bands of the Eanes Independent School District will hold its final Concert of the year Monday at 8 p.m. in the Westlake High School Cafeteria. Vince DiNino, director of the University of Texas Longhorn Band, will be featured as guest conductor. Appearing on the program will be the fifth Grade Band, the combined Sixth and Seventh Grade Bands, and the Westlake High School Symphonic Band. The Symphonic Band, recently chosen as Best In Class AA Concert Bands at the Six Flags Over Texas Band Contest, will be making their 38th public appearance of the year. Inez Buchan, student teacher from UT, and Lee Boyd Montgomery Jr., director of bands at Westlake, will also appear on the program. Tickets are available from band students or may be purchased at the door. Adults tickets are $1; student tickets are 50 cents. A good place to buy nationally advertised TAYLOR MADE MORNING G10R MATTRESSES You'll find the finett in Stepping Comfort with Morning Uory Sleep Set from the SSE-, .On W EtST klm Airport Bl Ivrf.. iml I.H. J3 t Ut Entrance t. HIGHLAND MALL 1 A MAY SPECIAL OFFER... FROM THE Professionals! -i:aooooooa': nflOBmn1 i" " Buy Up To $5000 of First National City Travelers Checks for a fee of only $2 CongreM at 5th397-220OMember FDIC Now New Northside Location RAY URBAN TV & APPL. 5841 Berkman Drive Windsor Village Center ' n't! A 926-6777 r i V"! " f The AMHERST D4025W Here's color viewing the entire family will enjoy! Big, full rectangular 19" diagonal Super-Screen picture in a compact-size grained Kashmir Walnut color cabinet. The Amherst also features Titan 101 Chassis, Solid-State Super Video Range Tuner, Customized Tuning and Automatic Tint Guard Control and 5" x 3" Speaker. o BRILLIANT CHROMACOLOR PICTURE! o OYER 90 : , SOLID-STATE! e SUPER-SCREEN! SUPER SCREEN lets you... ,, see more of the picture because it's as rectangular as a TV picture can be! HURRY! STOP IN TODAY! LIMITED QUANTITIES! 1500 S. CONGRESS 44I-7766-441-6310 marie antoinette DOWNTOWN ONLY MEMORIAL DAY O-EA Rr C REDUCTIONS UP TO Vl AND MUCH, MUCH MORE spring handbags wide selection casual or dressy new reductions pantsuits i reduced from stock long dresses new additions 99 22.99-24.99 n99 ,0 19.99 up from our other stores w" 29.99 misses, junior reg. 10.00 to 11.00 reg. to 44.00 . reg. 24.00 to 40.00 up DRESSES : : : ii qq layaway special 7,J famous-name wide variety ' reg. to 24.00 i . . i . untnmmed - nylon stretch gloves pants 15 99 (white only) Aite . . COCH5 reg. to 32.00 2.25 11vy 49.00 19 99 reg: 16.00 to 20.00 ,7nn . 17,77 reg. 3.50 , a 10.00 down, next reg. to 40.00 payment in August cotton knit b I ' solid and printed blouses, shirts Nassau ength shorts W Umbrellas and pant tops T-shirts, Tank tops odds n ends 2 on misses, junior .99 4.99,8.99 3.99 longo;s(lort USUOlly5,0 ' usually 5.00 ,Wec reg. to 22.00' dresses square or oblong vanity fair pecholo famous-ntime rompers, halters ! briefs Pan,,eS coordinates Q ' 1 99 reg. 1.75 each. 3 for 4.50 pants, blazers, jac shirts bikinis OH OA reg. to 4.00,, re 1.50 each, 3 for'4.00 ' XUOoff reg. 20.00 to 50.00 II

Clipped articles people have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 21,900+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra® Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the Austin American-Statesman
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free