The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 7, 1948 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, June 7, 1948
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Page 2
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TWO BI/YTHEVILLK (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS MONDAY, JUNK T, 1»4« Der Fuehrer Left Master Race JTcrriWe Heritage in Physical jRuins of Berlin, German People } By Eul JT. J<*M« VaU*t FM*s SUM Cormiponikmi BHRL1N. Junt 7. (U.P.)—Hitler left Iht master race n terrible hcrl- '.tefe h«r». Without a personal, visit, Hie pre-war American c»n scarcely •Mite how terriMe M, it. •' Ton »«« H first in the physical ruin that still litters Berlin In the .fourth year since the surrender. Later you sc« It in th« people themselves, . an airplane, downtown f/ "Berlin must look like an empty honeycomb. The opera is in ruins. So Is the Kaiser's place, and the Xd«n Hotel. The long rounded roof ot the Central Rullroad Station • (the Frledrichstrasse) is » skeleton o( black steel grldcrs. . In the bombed-out shell of Hit-' J«r's ornate chancellory, old men in .r*<js •«". pieces of mosiao they've chipped from the walls. The asking prtc« is one cigaret, or even a ^butt. The Russians arc carting away '•marble slabs from the walls to build > memorial.• The «pot In the garden where ' Hitler's body Is supposed to have -been burled disappeared under a pile of s«nd recently when the Russians dynamited the bunker. The Uuter Den Linden once was the proudest tree-shaded boule- . vard in all Germany Today the iUnter Den Linden is bare, nnd dust from crumbling mortar swirls in the wind across its broad pavements. The avenue looks wider thai ever because so many buildings are gone on either side. Walking East from Hie Brandcn- burger Gate, you look on the vigl\ for the American Embassy. Onlj the sheil of the embassy is there The windows are mere holes h Masonry. Inside, bricks and Uvistc girders are piled two stories high. Next on the right was Louis Ad Ion's famous hotel, once the las word in European luxury. Now up per floors are smashed clown an waits aad chimneys are jagge against the sky. The windows an doors which used to open on the Unter Den Unden are bricked tip More Trouble Looms in India solid. A wooden sign with the word "Adlon" hangs over (he former entrance, ind you come In from the resr now through a dark passage which has been shored up nke a tunnel In a, coal mine. About 50 rooms are in use again- Walk another 10 yards East and look for the Russian embassy and the big Hotel Bristol. British bombers battered them down to • their foundations In 1943. All the remains ot the buildings Is another wide gap In the skyline ot the Unter Den Unden. Here and there along the boulevard, a merchant lias reclaimed the ground floor and Is doing business there beneath the ruins of the upper stories. Unknown Soldier Urutuarded Remember the small Grecian- type building on ttie North side of th« Avenue Vhlch housed the tomb ,bf the Unknown Soldier? It i» still there but no black-booted luird o( honor slands at attention outalde any more. Through the ru»ty grilled door you can see a dry wreath on the tomb. A lew people stop in the desolate street to peek in. , Sticking out of one ruin is a steel beam some airman's bomb bent Into the shape of a question mark. Maybe the beam Is asking what happened. But If the question is when all this mess will be cleaned up, the answer is It may take 40 years. Berlin wasn't built in a day. Army engineers doubt it can be rebuilt In less than halt a century. Franklurt, Munich and Nuernberg are u badly ruined as Berlin. If not worse. The work of clearance goes 'on slowly. One plan is to make a memorial mountain of Berlin's rubble by piling It up i« the big public park called the Tiergarten. Another Is to put It, through rock crushers and remold it into building blocks. Temporary narrow gauge tracks wind through some of the worst ruins. Over these, the Germans are slowly hauling away bricks and broken masonry. When one collapsed building Is cleared away, the trscks are moved up beside another. Chicago Crime Syndicate to Be y olice Target CHICAGO, June 7. (UP) — ' Chicago Crime Commission an- lounced Saturday tliat it will launch "grass roots" campaign against the Chicago Crime Syndicate, which IV ays IULS developed tremendous po- ilical power both on a local and national basis. The syndicate exerts an influence bat is xonicltmeA felt "even in the :ialls of our law-making Iwdics." Virgil W. Peterson, commission director, said. The recent federal paroles ol I'aul Ricca, Louis (Little New York) Cainungrm, Phil D'Andren ami Charles Gioe, tour former heiich- mcn ot the scnrface Al Caponc. "amply demonstrate" tlie nationwide political power ot the crime syndicate, ePtcrson said. He asserted that the syndicate, now made up of remnants of the old Cnnone mob, has developed it-3 political jxiwer din-ing the p.ist three decades. "Everywhere they operate tliey have important political connections," Peterson said. The philosophy of the syndicate, Peterson said, was best expressed by the late. Bugsy Siege!, who was Jhot 10 death on the West Coast, when he said "We don't run for polill-1 cal office—we own politlclatis." Peterson said that more than halt the 46 cooperating neighborhood civic organizations in Chicago had reported that crime ha-s been Increasing recently in their areas. Atom Workers, Company Meet To Avert Strike Unlls of the Hyderabad army were reporUd moving towards its borders us India blockaded this little hold-out principality to force it to join the dominion. Negotiators seeking a peaceful settlement are conferring in New Delhi. Hyderabad, 126,16« square miles in area, has 49,341,810 inhabitants, mostly Hindus. Tax Foundation Telh Nation To 'Go Easy' on Vets' Bonuses NEW YORK, June 7. (UP)—The i them. tax foundation, a tax research or- Voters in eight other states— xnnlzRlkm urged the nation today Indiana. Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri to go tusy on further cash bonuses North Dakota. Pennsylvania, South to veterans. The Foundation said some slates haven't even paid for their world War One bonuses yet. It warned that World War II bonuses could become "an extreme financial burden" if the country should run into hard times. Vote r s In slate/; which have not yet passed on bonus proposals, the Foundation said, should "look beyond the einolional factors involved and give serious consideration Dakota and Wisconsin—are scho Goes to Greece 8Uw«n jot >T per cent. Running u Republican candidate, tlie general polled 52 per cent of th« volM, Truman 36 per cent, Wallace five per cent, with IS per cent undecided. Roper uld. Henry F. Grady, abov«, it Pr«sl- dent Truman's cholc* to b« the new U. S. Ambassador to Cr*«ce. Grady. now Ambassador to India, will succeed Lincoln MacVeagh, • recently named envoy to Portugal. duled in 1MB and 1949 to approve or reject another »1,200,OCO,00!) in cash bonuses, the foundation said. Will Swell Money Supply "Apnroval of such measures Is resulting in further swelling our money supply at thr very level where It will produce the greatest Inflationary effect," it snid. "Another sobering thought is the fact that both Interest and capital must be paid out of taxation over periods OAK RIDGE. Tenn,. Jun« T.— (UP)—Representives of 877 atomic worker* and the Carbide and Carbon Chemical Corporation meet here today in an attempt to agree on a contract and avert a threatened strike at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference wan arranged by the Federal Mediation and Con- cllllation Service. The company, which operates the atomic laboratory for the govern ment, and the Atomic Trades and Labor Council of 14 American Federation of Labor unions, representing the workers, have been at odds for months over terms of the contract. | A Taft-Hartley 80 day anti-strlk: njunction against the union, In 'orce since March, will expire midnight tonight. Atty. Gen. Tom Slark Is expelled to nsk it,s dlssolut Ion by federal lourt In Knoxvllle to morrow. In a vote last week the unior turned down the company's "fina offer" for a settlement 111 to 26 But a union meeting set for yes tcrday to discuss a strike and posi, 16ly set a date was called off la? week »fted union head Kennet Scott went to Washington for con-1 NEW YORK. June 7. — (inferences with other labor leaders; Gen- Dwight D. Eisenhower, new and the Atomll Energy Commlss- [head of Columbia University, could l on . S be elected to the presidency on The company's final offer would ' either the Republican or Democra- have granted the workers an average 10 cent an hour wage Increase. The union had withdrawn an original 21 cent an hour wage raise request and a later 15 cent an hour compromise proposal to demand a BACKACHE iNOW! Mi Mr B*ck«ch», Uc Ftliu. (MUIa« Up Klttll*. ttioa* cioudr utL«r, IrtlUtlnf pftuagt*. Ltff P»]M, clrclM under *ye*. kod »woll«n • nklM. due U <K>»-0!8.n!e ud non-<;>Unle Kldnt; »o<i BJtMtr IrwMM, UT Crrtm. Quick, t»mpltt« Eisenhower Could Win Presidency on Cither Party Ticket, Poll Shows Makers of New Tucker Car Plan Financing Method CHICAGO. June t. (UP)—Buyers of the new Tucker automobile will pay In advance for accessories— $'<nO worth—and will agree not to resell the car for one year under terms of a novel method of financing. It was revealed Saturday. Officials of the corporation confirmed trade reports that the firm planned to raise »27,000,000 by this method before beginning produc- lion on the new car about July 1. Under the plan, they explained, each prospective buyer would purchase $270 of accessories and receive an allocation number to de- to Immediate and future economic | U i on j as 25 years, effects of such action." 1 "A contracting economy such as The foundation said that nine that following the '20s could wcl states-Connecticut, Illinois. Massa-j TM nlt In rendering the. payment of chusctts, Michigan, New Hampshire, i B i lcn •>bltgatlons an extreme finan- New York. Ohio, Rhode Island nnd c ] n i burden." Vermont—have voted a total of $1,- The Foundation said the fact thai 600.000,000 in cash bonuses to World; 31 states have neither cash bonuses W»r II veterans. Inking on a bonded: nor pending referendums indicates Indebtedness of more than $1,000.- ft belief by many that the federal 000,000 In the present time to pay for i government has done well by the straight 26 cent an hour raise. Ark-Mo Ginners Group Elects Two Hayti, Mo., Men Forrest A. McGinley of Hayti, Mo., Saturday took over as executive vice president, secretary treasurer of the Arkansas-Missouri Cotton Gliixier.s Association, Another Hayti cotton man, Lamarr Thompson, also look office us a member of the Advisory Executive Committee. Both were elected at, the clostng session Friday of the Associiitlon'a meeting in Hot j Springs. | At the meeting. Rep, E. C. Gatli- tic ticket if he chose to run, according to Public Opinion Analyst Elmo Roper. Elsenhower has said repeal Illy that he does not want to be president, Roper said in a radio broadcast yesterday. Roper's nationwide survey showed Elsenhower could poll more votes than President Truman or any Republican candidate. His closest contender on the poll was former Gov. Harold E. Stassen of Minnesota. Runntng on the Democratic ticket against Stnssen as the Republiciun' candidate, Eisen hower received the nod from 40 p«r cent of the people questioned while POISON IVY OAK or SUMAC — I i j .« 1*1 * »n ii fi^-nit iii%.vuii K, in-p, ^i, \j, vt»\ii.- It said llifct federal contributions , of . Wcst Momph)s told the gin- mine lie dale of delivery on his to veterans benefits during the lour- • ncrs thRl there u ]JO h o( ,omoblle. Production will get un- j year period beginning with I94S will Ulg a i ong _ range [ arm program at ten aut' derwny nt a rate of SO cars hourly, '(approximate $1,450 per person, cotn- Prestou Tucker, president, said • pared with about $100 a man in a thnt the clause prohibiting resale j similar period beginning In 1919. of the car for one year was Included i These benefits Include cash in to cut down on the "blade market." the form of mustei ing-out pay. ter- Tucker snld that all jig and die mlnal leave pay. readjustment al• equipment Is Installed at the plant lowances and disability payments and the company has a stock pile of j and education and training benefits, 25,000 tons of steel. One prnduction ' tax exemptions, loans, insurance, line will Ire In service when opera- hospital care and other benefits. ing a long-range farm prog this session of Congress. Fourteen Mississippi County cotton men attended the meeting. tioiu; begin. Another factor, the Foundation said, is that In sonic areas the veterans theinselves ure opposed to African chameleons have tongues > cash payments to all "without re- longer than their bodies. ! gard for need." Read Courier New» vVam Ad». 8ci«nci hai discovered an excellent new treatment for ivy, oak and sumac poisoning. It's gentle and safe, dries up the blisters in » surprisingly ihort time, often within 24 hours. Atdru(gUI>,59i' A>k for IVY-DRY Give Your Home That PAINT IN OUR STORE A built-in battery tester devel- Of«d lor hearing aids makes possible for the user at any time an accurate checkup on the number of "hearing hours" remaining before new batteries arc necessary. It ou.cn with Smart Chairs and Sofa by PULLMAN 'f PAINT VALUES! •JL- We crs proud to announce a new point lino in our »tor« ,., new in our »tor« . . . but old in American tradition, with a 78-year record of faithful servic* .., Attrocffv* valu«s, always .. values than meeh Hie eye . . but rli«r«'» more to Pec Ge« . years of wear — resistance Charles A. Fleming Candidate for G»«rnor of Arkansas In announcing my candidacy lor, Governor, I wish to say if my friends will help me all they can, together w« will win * real victory. Schools and Roads are the principal ncedi of our State, and these are mr finst concern. I MQ * practical man and will gel the Job done. I ''''"" 1 Ckdrta A. Fleming Th* VMr Maa's rriead" to weather ... skilfully balanced formulae... all evolved to the famout Pee Gee Paint Laboratories . . . research rtafl and equipment without a peer anywhere. SMARTLY STYLED COLORS If it's eotor yow are intoretted in, eome hi, let ui show yov Pee Gee eokx chart* reflecting the "mode o( the moment" In decorator's shades. HARDWARE CO.InC HOME OF FAMOUS BRANDS 126 W.MAIN ST. PHONE 515 KIDNEY SOFA with Ftstoom Fringe High faihion in its x r * c *~ [ul two-cushion dexijrrt. of luxuriousfabrKk. Piece* Shown Here arc Featured in GOOD HOUSEKEEPING TUFTED-BACK BARREL CHAIR Reslendent in floral esplen ask, » Hying colors. gajr accent to any room. Choice W ,50 FOUNTAINS Ev«rywh«r«! This young lady would like to have her brakes checked, lights fixed, horn repaired— and head examined! We don'e examine heads. .. .but we do give your ear a complete examination from headlight to (ail-light, service and repair if expertly and inexpensively. Drivt in. SHELTON MOTOR H^A. COMPANY rti«t««443S OTHER TWO-PIECE SUITES IN BLUE OR WINE MOHAIR, MASSIVE ARMS, PRICED AT ONLY $249.50. WADE FURNITURE CO More for Your Money All the Tim* Sloros in Rt.vlheville, Ark.. Union City ft Martin, Tenn. Jjoctort recommend sound, relaxed sleep »• »n aid lo health. Science has shown that your energy increases « your sleep improve!. So put pep in your step by tr«lin| yourself !• th« "best in rest." See our display of Spring-Air Innerapring mattrefiBet ind bos springs, willi "roiltrolled comfort" advantages. Inspect the l>eaulifnl licking and the smart uilorinj. "Feel" the wonderful resiliency and supreme comfort which the special Spring-Air innersprinn units proviflV Trst Spring-Air in any manner 5011 choose, then buy it. You'll never know how coin fort aldt, reclfiil and r«- juveniting » matlrtss can he, until you h«v« •finally ilept on Spring-Air . . . then you'll know whit "Sleep Right, Wake up Bright" means. Cone in today for demonstration. Twin and full sirf Spring-Air iinifrspring m»ttre*Mf and matching r>ov springs, in attractive floral ticking or durable woven stripes priced «ach . II « I « \Afj\nF FURNITURE CO. • • • • el^ •• More for Your Money All «» Tim« Stores in BIy<h«vill«. Ark., Union Cily * Martin, Tenn.

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