Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on March 4, 1934 · 31
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 31

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Sunday, March 4, 1934
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31
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CUBS; TAKE OVER ISLAND TRAINING QUARTERS TODAY Walker Stays on Mainland to See Holdouts. BY IRVING VAUGHAN. Chicago Tribune Press Service. Yuma, Ariz., March 3. The citizens of Catalina island, Cal., will perform their annual baseball ritual tomorrow. The occasion will be the arrival, for the thirteenth consecutive year, of Chicago's Cubs in quest of physical perfection. Jimmy the Barber's nondescript brass band will be down at the boat side, there will be a lot of handshaking and general commotion and the Island then will settle back into Its customary routine. While the Cubs are greeting old friends and settling themselves for a ten day stay William Walker, the club president, will be engaged at Los Angeles talking business with Charles Root and Floyd Babe Herman. These boys have balked over terms but no great difficulty is anticipated. Infielder Billy Herman also is listed with the unsigned, but whether he will show up tomorrow to share in the salary discussions isn't known. Last reports had the young man on his cattle ranch somewhere In Texas. Go to Work Tomorrow. Actual training labors for the Chi-cagoans will get under way Monday morning as soon as the dew lifts from the grass and the worries of Manager .Charley Grimm will then be running on full time. These are many but none will require as much attention as the outfield. Grimm's biggest problem wouldn't be present if his bosses hadn't finally been successful in their four year quest for Chuck Klein, who was right pert as a hitter with the Phillies. Klein's arrival disturbed an outfield trio which was fairly good last season despite the partial fall down of Babe Herman. Of course, the ultimate solution of the matter may mean a better fiy chasing trio than previously, but Grimm raudt first reach the solu' tion. Because Herman was a op last year the inclination is to take it for granted that he can be counted out of the picture even before the spring exhibition tests are completed. That naturally would make matters easy for the boss, but it doesn't follow that the Babe is going to permit himself another sea-eon of suffering: The charge has been made that Herman couldn't hit last season because he ia the type which tightens up unless he's working with a team that has no thoughts of winning a pennant. If that's true of him. it still must be proved. Star ball players who had no such complex bad their off years. Stevie Cheats the Bench. The outfield matter also would be simple If Riggs Stephenson were not around to demand attention. The old fellow has been threatening to fall apart now for three or four seasons, but to date nobody has been able to shove him back on the bench for keeps. When his infirmities permit he's in there working, and nobody excels him in the matter of producing in the pinches. Until somebody, the Babe for Instance, can do that, Stephenson will find himself employed at something better than bench warming. The one bright feature of the situation Is that Grimm at least will be prepared for emergencies. It is almost an old custom for one or more Cubs to meet up with serious mishap either during spring training or before the season is half elapsed. KJ Cuyler for Instance, Is a sucker for Inluries. Loss of Cuyler for an extended period would be a jolt because he is about the only one really qualified to play center field. Herman is too erratic for that position. Stevie can't cover the ground. Klein might da fairly well, although he has spent most of his career in positions where not much movement was necessary. What About Stainback? Also present among the outfielders Is George Stainback, purchased from the Wrigley owned Los Angeles team. Stainback might be the greatest prospect In years, but it so happens that he will be up against classy opposition even if Mr. Herman is counted out. Klein hit a mere .368, Stephenson .329, Cuyler .817. and Herman .239 last season. Stainback hit the lively Coast league ball for a .325 average. However, Stainback Is young, so, if necessary, can afford to sit around on the bench until such time as one of the old fellows gets rusty. RULE CENTENARY OUT OF SOUTHERN BASKET TOURNEY Jackson, Miss., March 3. (JP) Centenary college of Shreveport, La., was disqualified from the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic association basketball tournament here tonight less than an hour before the Gentlemen were to begin defense of their title. The action was taken by the executive committee of the association which met at the call of Dr. J. W. Provine, S. L A. A. president. The disqualification came as a result of the executive committee throwing out all games played by Centenary in which Marse Harper, star center, participated. Harper recently was declared Ineligible for having taken part in athletics at a junior college before entering Centenary. Maroon Fencers Hand Illinois 10 to 7 Defeat University of Chicago fencers defeated Illinois, 10 to 7, at Bartlsrt gymnasium yesterday. The Maroons, who have not been defeated in Big Ten competition, led In the foils, 6 to 4, and in the sabers, 3 to 1. The epee events were tied at two each. Burton Young won five of Chicago's victories, defeating Epstein In the foils. Epstein has held the conference foils title for two years and had never been defeated In the Big Ten. - Phipps and Rand Take Court Tennis Crown Philadelphia, Pa., March ' 3. UP) Ogden Phipps and William Rand Jr., of New York, today won the national doubles court tennis championship. They defeated William C. Wright and John C. Bell Jr., Philadelphia, -4, M, 12-10. v , j7 mi v 11 i . , .ir M ' SOXSGLEFOa. GAMASjTIIEl START TO LABOR w4 .., FREDDIE CASERIO, middleweight (extreme right), who was last year's Golden Gloves captain and is a qualiBer this year, and the eight heavyweights and light heavyweights who will Sght in finals Friday night at Chicago Stadium. Top row, heavyweights, left to right: MAX 31 AREK, Notre Dame, unattached; MURRAY SPENCER, Nashville, Tenn.; OTIS THOMAS, Savoy A. C, Chicago; STEVE SMOZY, Cleveland, O. Bottom row, light heavyweights, left to right: ARIO SOLDATI, Rockford, 111.; JOE BAUER, Cleveland; JOE LOUIS, Detroit, Mich., and PETER GREGAITIS, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1 I V I.- ' ' X it V1- '"21 jiC -v su'ruf ' ' v i 1 St . w J , tVK , 'r i .4 i 1 -f- ! i i r 4 ,4 r . f . f' " ' j f ! T?5vH',n-f''tT if h I' 4 . -r-i 8i r f 1 " 1 i if-' 1. i I T3- w r ?v m -iJDu - " 0l" r ".r '! 1 r t 3 CHARLES WOZNIAK (C. Y. O., Chicago). 160 POUND DIVISION. WILLIAM TREEST (Joliet, 111.). FRED TYUS (Peoria, 111.). KEITH GRAVES (Peoria. Ill) ADAM LATOZ (Danville, III.) 147 POUND DIVISION. DANIEL CLARK DANNY FARRAR (Detroit, Mich.). (Cleveland. O.). -.v A. X : ' , v- ,f ; 4 ' ' .. ' 'I .-v-v' ' ."" - i .1 ; - A.'. vt..JT .rf; - - f - r-ti c f f -r L-vVH X r Ik 135 POUND DIVISION. JOHNNY BOMMARITO FRANK BO JACK PHIL KEN NE ALLY (Detroit. Mich.).. (Cleveland, O.). (C. Y. O.. Chicago). AARON WADE (Peoria, 111.). ANDY SCAVINI (C. Y. 0 Chicago). 126 POUND DIVISION. IRVING GOLDSTEIN AL NETTLOW (Traf ton's. Chicago.). (Detroit, Mich.). 9- i . V. ' -SJ jri& Sfi.: n .,:.$r . 'V x - i ' I. f . i ' - J4 i V 1 1 si 31 ' 1 -- X s r y 1', ' r"vs 4'. - ' 'V r V yl ' ' "- v - fwj - - t-i f ' ' '-- - - j i i v i v - t ' I 1 1 V. f ) ' t rH i f , I 5 ' ' -..' r , , , j- , . . T j f. - tt - 'Sl i f - J H . . - .' I , r A z.: h I . ' 1 i JJAr HOUSE (Michigan City, Ind.). 118 POUND DIVISION. . 112 POUND DIVISION. JOE MINNECCI TOM BARRY TROY BELINI RAY HARRIS JOHN BROWN PATSY URSO , JESSE LEVELS WILLIAM JOYCE (C. Y. O., Chicago). (SpringSeld, 111.). (Cleveland, O.). (South Bend, Ind.). (C. Y. O., Chicago). (Grand Rapids, Mich.). (Cleveland, O.). (Gary, Ind.). These 32 boys are the best Sgbters in Chicigoland, survivors of a eld of S,177 who entered Golden Gloves competition several weeks ago, but their hardest battles are still ahead. Four remain in each division, yet there can be only one champion crowned.. So next Friday night's semi-Bnala and 6nala at the Chicago Stadium will produce the greatest bouts of the year. MICHIGAN SWIM TEAM DEFEATS ILLINOIS, 50-34 Champaign, 111., March 3. Special Although Michigan defeated Illinois In a dual swimming meet, 50 to 84, today, Charles Flachmann, Illinois dash entrant, was the Individual star, winning three events and establishing a new tank record in the 50 yard dash. Michigan's supremacy in the relays and better balance decided the meet. Illinois defeated Michigan in water polo, $ to 1, Capt. Frank Hewitt of the Blinl scoring four goals. The summaries: 400 YARD BELAY Won by Michigan Kamlenaki, Blake, EoberUon, Keunerl. Time 8 :47. 200 YARD BREAST 8TROK Won by Lawrence ( Minhiiran 1 : Van T-iiin fTllinnlai econd; Jone (IllinoUl, third. Time 2:42.3. 150 YARD BACK. STROKE Won by Hatch Illinois; Boice Michigan J. second; Larseh Illinois, third. Time 1:49.3. 60 YARD DASH Won by Flachmann tmi-noial: Dalrymple Michigan, second; Kami-enaki Michigan, third. Time .24.3. 440 YARD SWIM Won by Drysdale Michifan; Crist y Michigan, second; Hewitt (IllinoU). third. Time 6:06.0. 100 YARD DASH Won by Flachmann Illinois; Benner IMichigan, second; Dalrymple (Michipanl, third. Time :63.7. FANCY DIVING Won by Dexner Michi-s"anj; Johnston Michig-an, eeond: Jensen Illinois, third. 220 YARD SWIM Won by Plaehmann Illinois; Robertson Michigan, second: Derseh Miohiffan, third. Time 2 :23,1. 800 YARD MEDLEY RELAY Won by Michigran Drysdale, Lawrence, Dalrymplel. Tin 9M.1. Giants, Senators Doyle's Picks in Pennant Races New York, March 3. fU. P. Jack Doyle, Broadway betting commissioner, picks the New York Giants and Washington Senators to repeat for the National and American league pennants this season, according to his f.n-nual pre-season prices. Doyle has the greatest confidence in the Senators, offering only even money against their winning, whereas he offers 8 to 2 against the Giants' chances. Because of strength acquired in the off-season, Doyle picks the Boston Red Sox to finish third in the American race. He offers only 4 to 1 against their winning. Here are Doyle's prices: NATIONAL LKAGl'K. Win. 3-3 3-1 7-2 fl-1 St. Louis -I Brooklyn , 30-1 Phlladplphia ,..10-1 Cincinnati 100-1 New York Chicago Pittsburgh Boston Second. 1- 3 Even 6-5 2- 1 . 2-1 15-1 40-1 40-1 AMERICAN LEAGUE. Washington New York . Boston .... Cleveland .. Chicago ... Detroit ... Philadelphia Win,. Even 2-1 4-1 . 16- 20-1 30-1 60-1 61. Louis 100-1 Second. , 1-6 8-5 4-5 4-1 8-1 10-1 20-1 40-1 Third. 1- 0 2- 5 8-5 4-5 4-6 6-1 !0-l 20-1 Third. 1-20 1-6 1- 4 2- 1 3- 1 4- 1 8-1 80-1 MIAMI-NASSAU ; YACHT RACE IS WON BYVAMARIE NASSAU, Bahamas, March 3- V a. marie, the class A yacht sailed by Vadlm Makaroff of the Nassau Yacht club, won the first annual International Miami-Nassau boat race in 32 hours 35 minutes 38 seconds, , The Vamarie's corrected time for the 200 mile trip brought Makaroff possession of the Nassau development board trophy, , Musketeer, the class B boat sailed by Phillip Roosevelt of Oyster Bay, N, Y finished second. Her actual time was 49:55:10 and her corrected time was 42:14:00. Another class B craft, Water Witch, won the third place. The boat was piloted by T. C. Wood Jr. of Shore Acres Yacht club, Mamaroneck. N. Y. Water Witch's actual time was 68:15:10 and her corrected time was 62:14:05. .. . Smy the Protests Starting Date of Cup Series Wilson Again Rejects ' ' ' Contract from Dodgers Martinsburg, W. Va March 3. MFO Hack Wilson, outfielder far the Brooklyn Dodgers, is still a holdout. He said today a new contract had the same objectionable features as the first one and be wouldn't sisrn. Hack said he will meet club officials in Orlando, Fla., next week to talk further. TORONTO, Ont., March 8. OP) Declaring the present plans of starting the National Hockey league playoffs March 20 are unfair to Toronto, Connie Smythe, manager of the Maple Leafs, said today he would petition President Frank Calder to postpone the opening game to March 22. Smythe pointed out that the Leafs are scheduled to play three games during the last four nights of the regular season, which ends March 18. He claims his team would not be at Its best for the first game with the winner of the American division, probably the Detroit Red Wings, two nights later. " ' ' ' He will suggest to Calder that the first two games for the Stanley cup be played March 22 and 24 on the Toronto rink and the third game March 25 on the home ice pf the opposing team. ', ': . Stengel Sends Four , ' Dodgers Through Drill Orlando, Fla., March 3. U. P. Manager Casey Stengel of the Brooklyn Dodgers, sent Tony Cuccinello, Joe Stripp, Ralph Boyle, and Leslie Munns through a light workout today, They ar arly arrival. . OKLAHOMA A.-M. BEATS MIDDIES , ' V ON MAT 31-3 Annapolis, Md., March 3.' Oklahoma A. and M. college wrestlers today gave the Naval academy team its first defeat of the season. The Aggies won seven of the eight bouts to triumph, 31 to 3. The Aggies, ,. national , collegiate champions of 1933, won the first six bouts and led Navy, 26 to O. but the Middles were saved from a shutout when Sully Vogel, light heavyweight, defeated Jim Dupree. The mldwesterners gained five falls and two on decisions to give the midshipmen the most decisive defeat they have suffered in recent years. Summary: ; , ' 118 notind class Perry, 'Aireies,' threw Jurado with a reverse chancery in 0 min utes 31 seconds. - 129 pound elass Flood, Arties, threw Dougherty with a half nelson and leg lock iq 8 minutes 6 seconds.. , ,. . -. 135 pound class Rasor, Arties, defeated Sollenberrer. Time sdvanUie, minutes 15 seoonds. . - 14 nound ' class Kelly. Aretes, threw Wrig-ht with a body preas in 9 minutes 87 166 pound class Lynn, Atrrles, defeated Cole. Time advantage, 3 minutes 14 sec- nidri nsnnd class Total, Kavy. defeated Dupree. Tims advantage, 1 minute 17 seconds. Unlimited Hanly, Arties. threw Walkop with a- bar and chancer hold in 6 minutes 11 seconds. Seek Funds to Build Memorial to John McGraw Full Cast. Except Appling, Reports to Fdnseca. 1 I : rv 1 .: .i-(U (SL: I f I Springfield. IU., March 8. Spe cial. A nation-wide campaign to erect a memorial to John J. McGraw in Baltimore was launched here today with Incorporation of the John Joseph McOraw Memorial Association of America. The object, as explained by Richard F, Kinsella, former scout for McGraw and one of the Incorporators, Is to interest fans In a great volunteer campaign. Subscription of ten cents a person will . be sought. ' '' Leading baseball men throughout the country will be Invited to assist in the project. Among those who will be asked to cooperate are K. M. Landis, baseball commissioner; John A. Heydler, president of the National league; William Harridge, president of the American league; J. C. Taylor Spink, the presidents of all minor leagues, Christy Mathewson Jr., William Bill Lange, Ty Cobb. Amos Carter, and Harry F. Sinclair. John B. Lobert of Philadelphia and Frank Belcher of New York, former associates of McGraw, are the other incorporator with Kinsella. BY EDWARD BUCNS. Chleaco Tribune Press Berrice.1 Pasadena, CaL, March 8. The entire White Sox cast, excepting only wandering Luke Appling, was on hand this morning for the first scheduled practice of the full company. ' Presi- dent Lou Comiskey and Vice President Harry Grablner Insisted that Appling is not a holdout. Several times since Appling has been a member of the Sox he has boarded the wrong train In starting for the training base. Two years ago when the club split Its training at Mineral Wells and Saa Antoni", Tex Luke wandered about the nation for days and days before getting his bearings. Another year he forgot the re porting date until somebody noticed he was hanging around Atlanta later than usual and told him he was tardy. In view of this history, there Is little anxiety about Appling except the nab ural fear that he may get run over en route. . No Shoes No Workout. Two other athletes, though they were present, did not work out. Sam Jones and Jack Hayes forwarded their spiked shoes by air mail a week ago. The shoes haven't arrived, and neither Sam nor Jack donned suits. The boys won't wait longer than Monday on the air mail, however, before purchasing new footwear. - It was more than an hour after today's roll call that practice began in earnest. The first hour was spent in the taking of news movies. A bevy of beautiful maidens, the deb auxiliary of the Pasadena Junior Chamber of Commerce, participated in the movie posing. The gals draped Hawaiian leis around the neck of the regulars. presented Manager Lew Fonseca with a huge key to the city and Al Sim mons with a monster floral bat. Earn thaw's in Shape. , The appearance of George Earn- shaw perhaps brought the biggest flurry of excitement among the Sox officials. Before he worked out Earn-shaw weighed 200 pounds, 20 pounds under the weight he carried to the A's camp last year. Jimmy Dykes testi fied that he hadn't seen Farnshaw in such good shape since the Athletics three pennant winning years, during which George won 67 games while losing only 28. Earnshaw confided that he hasn't crooked an elbow for so much as a stein of amber since repeal day. Ted Lyons reported without any ex cess weight. Ted spent the off season in southwest Louisiana, where folks never get fat. Vanishing Joe Chamberlin was on hand in the flesh and Is not expected to do a Dillinger this year. His first work was at the plate. He knocked two balls over the center field hedge. French TJhalt, who Is expected to play many games in the Sox outfield this season, also sent several out of the field. . Catcher Mervyn Shea, who was in uniform despite his recent attack of flu, was asked to take it easy. Johnny Pasek and Morgan Snyder caught all the batting practice. The pitching was done by Pomorski, Stine, Tietje, and Wyatt. . . In the Infield practice Fonseca worked Hed Kress at second base. It is probable that Red will be asked to fight it out with Hayes for that po sition. Red squawked a little about playing second in the early weeks of last season, but subsequent happen ings may have convinced him that he is In no position to express any pref erence as to playing spots. Tomorrow all hands will observe the Sabbath. Manager Fonseca had held off decision until he had seen the progress made in the first drill of the ensemble. Then he proclaimed a day of rest for everybody. LARRY FRENCH SIGNS CONTRACT AT PIRATE CAMP Pittsburgh, Pa., March 3. TJ. P. The Pittsburgh Pirates' No. 1 pitcher. Larry French, today signed a contract at the Paso Robles, CaL, training camp, it was learned here as the main squad of Pirates prepared to depart for the west coast. , . . French came to terms after a three hour conference with Manager George Gibson and President William S. Dens- wanger. , It was not learned at what terms he signed, but it was believed he received an Increase over last year's figure. Floyd Young and Larry Coller will leave Pittsburgh Monday morning. They will be joined at Chicago by Fred Lindstrom, Tommy Thevenow, and Rookie Nick Etten, while Paul and Lloyd Waner and Wallie Roettger will join the party at Omaha. The rest of the squad will go direct to the camp. Mancuso Expected to Join Giants Late This Month Houston, Tex., March I. C43) The physician attending Gus Mancuso. who has been 111 of typhoid fever for five weeks, said today he probably would be able to report to the New York Giants spring training camp " the latter part of this month." Mancuso was the first string catcher for the world champions last year. The physician said Mancuso was "getting along fine" and probably would lt-ave the hospital next week. HOCKEY TONIGHT at :30 3500 SEATS Ceasral AdmUaioa 75c 3500 SEATS RESERVED (Tax Imct Mesfresl (Tax Ie- t Chicago Blackhawks vs. Maroons TICKETS AT Cbicafo Stadium and Blackhawks' Headquarters, 228 N. La Salle CHICAGO STADIUM 1800 glsck W. Msdi.es 11

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