Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on July 7, 1933 · 25
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 25

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Friday, July 7, 1933
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THE , WORLD'S FRIDAY. GREATEST NEWSPAPER ! ...1)ofgs....,..p....(0y.:, TA.R.iA,N..:TA!1, viliii..sTRAN.oRs Pitching Strategy Upsets Hitters. - BY IRVING VAUGHAN. The old theory that it takes practice to perfeet team play took a slap between -the eyes yesterday when the mar actors Of the American and National leagues showed themselves as two distinct combinations before 49,000. , The ragged work that some Of the 49,000 might have expected didn't appear. Instead there was perfect coordination in defensive play, which is about the only place it can be revealed. If this wit.1 true of the Nationals. It was doubly true of the victorious American league outfit. The spectacle proved that a defensive star in any one position remains a defensive star even when lined up alongside strangers. The players fitted together as well as if they bad been pals all summer. Simmons Covers Well. ' 'Al Simmons furnished the outstanding example of the American league's effort to balance power from one post tion into another where a known weakness existed. Old Babe Ruth. still a ' hero despite his infirmities, doesn't get around as be once did. That's why Pie Traynor of the Pirates, pinch batting for Dick Bartell of the Phillies in the seventh inning, plunked Bob Grove. Itifack's southpaw ace.' for a double. It was just a fly ban more to right than to center. There was a time when Ruth could have caught it in his hip pocket. But the Babe didn't have a chance even to start for it yesterday. Sim-Mena, playing center at - the time called for the ball the second it sailed into the air. Ile tore over into right. reached down with his gloved band and rolled over. But the ball was just out of his reach. Before it was recovered Traynor was on second. where he stayed. Just before that there had been evidence of Ruth's inability to get around. Lon Warneke's triple in the seventh was Just a high, lazy fly cfose to the right field line. The Babe tried hard enough, but couldn't bend down even to halt the ball as it landed. Little Chance for Strategy. So far as strategy was concerned there wasn't much chance for the two managersConnie Mack of the Amer'. can league team and John McGraw to reveal any of their pet theories. Mack didn't have to do much thinking after the third inning. Mr. Ruth's homer relieved him of that detail. Prom then on it was just a matter of protecting the lead and no trouble developed. Early in the game McGraw bad the choice of a bunting or free swinging attack, and be took the latter, which occasioned more or less of a surprise. Ilafey's pop single was just a bit too far for Gehringer to reach and Terry followed with a clean single through i short. With none out, two On and the score 0 to 0, it was logical to look for a bunt. But Wally Berger of the Breves took his swing and bounced to Jim Dykes of the White Sox for a double play. Then Bartell was fanned by Vern Gomez. Maeks Strategy V. Mack played his band masterfully In the order in which he worked his pitchers. He started off with a fast bailer. Gomez. Just when the Nationals thought they had accustomed themselves to speed and fast curves, Alvin Crowder, the foxy Senator, was brought in and for three innings he served up an assortment of slow stuff, with some speed thrown in. It was one of the latter Frankie Frisch lined Into the right field seats in the sixth. Then the Nationals were thrown off their stride again. They had to look a t Bob Grove's terrific speed.. They bit him. but when more hits meant runs he pulled down the curtain. One instance of this was the manner In Continued on page 27, column 41 NATIONAL LEAGUE. AB R 11 Martin, 4 0 0 Jrisch,b 4 1 2 Klein, rt.... 4 0 1 P. Waner, rt 0 A Matey, 4 ft 1 Terry, lb 4 0 2 Berger, cf....: 4 ft 0 Bartell, ss 2 0 0 fTraynor 1 0 1 Itubbell, 0 0 0 Cuceinello 1 0 0 J. Wilson, c 1 0 0 O'Doul 1 0 0 Hartnett, 1 0 0 Manahan, p 1 0 0 Warneke, p 1 1 1 English, ea 1 0 0 VENOM 34 8 24 11 0 - Lee, AW1 SAN. '144Nr LOVE , I VheNT (OU OR MN1 OWN PLEAtECOUNT BESZFORD VA LOW.: RIbM IN 114 COUNTRY .o I.e.& á givolli" hr''GRAOL.V141.1.X n-te cA DRAM TO A WrOP HAS ANy OWE EVE AND l'owNSEND 'TOLI You wwAY A UNOFfrHE i E4LU'flFOLilRL mo'roft - ?nu 4J;ZE-- ' V 77 SPORTS WILL NOT BE GOOD FIELD TO INVOKE EQUALITY Somebody Must Lose So Somebody Can Win in Contests. BY WESTBROOK PEGLERVialeago Tribune Press Serviee. New York. July 6.---(Specia1.1I have been giving serious thought to the national effort to equalize things or level them off and the idea has occurred to me that this might cause great confusion in the sport business. In sport the proposition usually requires a winner and a hindmost and the party who has wagered his money on the winner expects to accumulate a little. On the other band, the citizen who wagers on the hindmost customarily takes one last, sheepish squint at his tickets hoping to And that the dealer gave him chances on the right steed by mistake, which seldom happens, then tears them up or throws them over his shoulder with the remark that it was only money, anyway. , The winner wins some and the loser loses some and this has been going on for so long that nowadays people will find it very bard to surround an Idea that things could be otherwise. Yet it seems possible that under the upside down plan of industrial recovery the winners could be made to divide with the losers in order to make things equal. In that case there would be no point in winning and. inasmuch as winning is the object of all wagering, business on the horse ! tracks would come to a standstill. ! Some citizens, being smarter or luckier than others, win more consistently and accumulate large sums, but this money is not retired from action entirely or for very long. The winners would go in for larger wagers and higher spending and in a generation or two they produce a line of mentally infirm heirs who marry series of poor but beautiful muscle dancers out of night clubs, or moving picture ladies and the money is redistributed. , This has been going on for a long time. and when all other means of redistribution fail the rich families may be relied upon to result in a generation who will pose for newspaper pictures kissing ladies whom they Just happened to - meet, somewhere, who presently sue them for divorce, with alimony or for breach of promise. In a prizefight, the plan to level things off would require that punches be evenly distributed. One pugilist bits another a tap on the chin and is then required to hold still while his opponent hits him back. Under the system of rugged individualism when one pugilist bits another a tap on the chin he is expected to follow this one up with that which is known to the trade as a furious volley of lefts and rights to the face and body.- It he should suddenly hold still and put his chin out to be hit back, the Continued on page 27, column 7. GAME OF THE CENTURY AMERICAN LEAGUE. R 11PAR ARK HPA E O 0 3 lJ Chapman, If-rt. 5 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 5 3 0 Gehringer, 2b 3 1 0 1 3 0 O 1300Ruth,rf 412100 O 0000West,ef 000000 O 1000Gehrig,lb 2001201 O 2 7 2 0 Simmons et-If 4 0 1 4 0 0 O 0400Dykes,3b 3122 40 O 0 0 3 0 Cronin, os 3 1 1 2 4 0 O 1000R.Ferrell,c 3004 00 O 0000Gomez,p 101000 O 0000crowder,p 100000 602 6011AvertI1 101000 00000Grove,p. 100000 O 0200 00100 11.000 O 0000 HAS ANy owe EVER roLt) You wHAY sou I 1-44.VZ NEVSR ZEEM set AS 'You RS 31 4 9 :1,7 11 1 Batted for Wilson in sixth. Matted for Bartell in seventh. Batted for Hubbell in ninth. Batted for Crowder in sixth. National league...,............ .. . . ............... American league 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1-4 Runs batted inMartin, Frisch, Ruth 2, Gomez, Averill. Two base hit Traynor. ' Three base hitWarneke. , Home runsRuth, Frisch. Stolen baseGehringer. SacrificeR. Ferrell. Double playsBartell to Frisch to Terry; Dykes to Gehrig. Left on basesNational league, 5; American league, 10. Bases on ballsHallahan, 5; Hubbell, 1. Struck outHallahan, 1; Warneke, 2; Hubbell, 1; Gomez, 1; Grove, 3. HitsOff Balaban. 2 in 2 innings none out in 3d; 'Warneke, 6 in 4; Hubbell, 1 In 2; Gomez, 2 In 3; Crowder, 3 in 3; Grove, 3 in 3. Winning pitcherGomez. Losing pitcherHallahan. UmpiresDinneen A. L. at plate, Bigler N. L.3 at first, McGowan A. L. at second, Klein N. L. at third for the first four and a half innings; Mem IN.L.1 at plate, McGowan A. L.1 at first, Bigler IN. L.1 at second, stpd ste4. Lit 41 at third for remainder gt pose !litue ZI)Ja Is PROUD OF ITS ALL-STAR EFFORT Pitchers Thwart Famed Heavy Hitting Corps. BY EDWARD BURNS. The National leaguers felt no shame at having been second best in the Game of the Century. They conducted themselves like the stars they've been in their league and with one exception stopped the power that many predicted would crush them. Babe Ruth was the one American leaguer who developed the bone crushing strength boasted by the Americans. And even so Babe was the only man to fan twice. - The great Lou Gehrig never got a hitIn fact. never got the ball out of the infield. Half of this. of course, was due to the fact that he walked twice. But the other two times he stepped to the plate he tapped to the first baseman and fanned on three pitches. Dykes Hits Twice. That splendid performer. Joe Cronin, current leader of the American league batsmen, had to be content with a single, and Ben Chapman. who has been in the big five most of the year, reached first once, and that time on a bunt. Hubbell fanned him on three pitches in his final trip to the plate. Al Simmons, who considers one hit a game a total loss was held to a single. and Lon Warneke made him hit into a double play as Lon's first act of the game. The only two bit gent in the game except Ruth, the inevitable exception in every big baseball spectacle. was Jimmy Dykes, who got a walk and two singles for a, day's batting average of .667. which Jimmy probably would like to substitute for his current league mark of .264. The Nationals gave the Americans an edge in the number of total hits, but surpassed them in total bases, 14 to 12. Ruth's homer was matched by Frank'. Frisch's smack of equal caliber. Ruth's sock was the Americans' only extra base bit. - Warneke knocked a triple for the Nationals and Fie Traynor slammed out a double. Four Strikeouts Each. In the matter of strikeouts the boys whiffed to a Mexican standoff. Martin. Bartell, Hartnett. and Cuccinello each failed once to connect with the ball, and Ruth with two, and Chap! man and Gehrig. his Yankee mates, with one strikeout each, brought the American total to four. Unbiased observers, however probably will point out that there wal only one important strikeout In the game, that of Gabby Hartnett, with the tying runs on third and second, with one out, in the seventh. Gabby went down on live pitches by Lefty Grove, a tragic three swings for National enthusiasts. Since this is a National league consolation piece, the least said about control the better. Gomez, Crowder. and Grove did not walk a man. Hallahan walked five during his curtailed tenancy and he was on the way to walking Ruth when he dropped in the cripple that Ruth socked with such venom. Hubbell walked the first man to face him to bring the total to six. , Hubbell Is Puzzle. Hubbell, doped as the National league pitcher with the best chance to stop the American league sluggers, pitched the seventh and eighth innings, and with the exception of Dykes the batsmen were fooled by his screw ball, just as much as the dopeeters said they would be. Dykes singled between third and short for the only hit off Carl, and only one other batsman got the ball out of the Infield. Gehringer ended the Americans' offensive with a long fly to Berger. - In the matter of defensive , play there was little to choose between the two galaxies. The one error of the contest was made by Gehrig and meant absolutely nothing. Lou half lost a foul by Bartell in the sun, then dropped It Bartell promptly gave Lou another chance on the same kind of ball and Lou fought off the sun this time to make the catch. Ruth Stars in Meld. The defensive work, though perfect, rarely was spectacular. The most thrilling catch of the day was made by Ruth in the eighth, when, running backward, he backed up against the scoreboard in right center to pull down Hafey's great drive. If , Babe had been forced to back another step he probably would have knocked himself down. But the ball came down just in time and the Babe was spared an imminent thump. The next most extended effort to Waalland te nt-gplioft r ALL MY LIPZ- ' wit141yeb FOR UCH A I momENrr -rt-1 , o CIAP 'YOU IN MY ARM ANt) HOLD VOU oektsID "TELL- '(OU HOW MUCI4 I ADORE. 'YOU) BASEBALL'S GREATEST Mdr"Nne,At 6,4 -.06106:,i veol .00 .owe ,r ks.i 1 f,' r...7.7..m.a."17'....! - . ,,,1 's..z.,:t,i - ig P22 f- ' i, 1 ,rr pk y ' 0 1,0 " ..0 . Fighting Irish! Boy1 That's News Hennelly Mulligan, Hearns and Hughes There are no synthetic Irishmen on the team of amateur boxing champions Ireland is sending against Chicago's Golden Glove winners Aug. 2 at Soldiers' field. Victorious over Italy and other continental opponents, the boys from Erin intend to show America the real meaning of "Fighting Irish!" ' The Tribune will construct an arena to seat 50,000 who enloy , clean, vigorous boxing. Every location provides an unobstructed view of the ring. Nearly 30,000 seats are available for 55 cents. All are reserved. ,- - The ringside prices are $3.30, $2.50, $2 and $1.10. The early applicants get the choice seats. Send check or money order. payable to Chicago Tribune, to Golden Gloves Ticket Manager, Room 530, Tribune Tower, Chicago. You may also order by telephone. Call Superior 0100 and ask for Local 466 or 530. U - Here's the American league team which won the Game of the Century yesterday at Comiskey park, 4 to 2: Players are numbered as follows: 1Bat boy. 2Bill Conroy of Athletics, who caught in batting practice. 3Lou Gehrig, New York 4Babe Ruth, New York. 5Oral Hildebrand, Cleveland. 6Manager Connie Mack. 7foe Cronin, Washington. 8Lefty Grove, Philadelphia. 9Bat boy. 10Bill Dickey, New York. 11Al Simmons, Chicago. 12Lefty Gomez, New York. 13Wes Ferrell, Cleveland. 14Earl Averill, Cleveland. 15Jimmy Dykes, Chicago. 15Bat boy. 17Trainer Ad Schacht, Chicago. 18Coach Eddie Collins, Boston. I9Tony Lazzeri, New York. 20Alvin Crowder, Washington. 21Jimmy Fozz, Philadelphia. 22Coach Art Fletcher, New York. 24Ben Chapman, New York. 25Rick Ferrell, Boston. 25Sam West, St. Louis. 27Charley Gehringer, Detroit. 28Bat boy. (TEIBC2CE photo. ;k 11.. t'Yelca'14 ..!al,itr '016 il k A.1001C eto.'.' 'I a !.:4.-e, :,, 'I 1 '1,Ifk 0:: ' 4 )1: , Lt! ktur: ,.... ',!, ty,0.4.- , ,, ckkilviloillt:rir 1 A -.: tt34'.4 P'....f,;,,I, . e-' - ' . ,,i "; ' 41P1I '-'. E ; a 1 a "".- - 0,-. - it 1,......6.4. A,..1, .. A4 se lio. .-,........-0-, -r-Tn- 4 S. 1.. Sko. o' , ! 6 : 'tN 1,''.. 7 6' g v. '--, 1 I 6 77".N '?" 1 - '''...v4 7.2 1, , , ,,.e , , . ar----- - . , , Ty i t , , ,-, .1,,,.'111) tz,, rit',... 4,..-9,11.5 i 1,- '164'1.1 ' I-. ;',0 ', 4 - -Jr. 7.,A, ..v4 , A 0 (1-) - 4 k7) '., 4 -11. id t Sit - - . MICKEY 'WALKER IS BADLY BEATEN BY BROUILLARD Boston. Mass., July 6.UP)---The amazing ring career of Mickey Walker appeared to be nearing its close tonight when the Itumson veteran took a terrific 10 yound lacing from Lou Brouillard of Worcester. . . At no time was the 32 year old Walker able to make one of his bulldog stands. t While going down to his first defeat under a southpaw's fists, he managed to show only one flash of his old time form In the fourth and fifth rounds, when Brouillard slowed down his terrific 'opening attack.' Walker's margins in those sessions were slight. In the previous rounds he bad attempted to land his looping lefts and rights. but Brouillard at. ways managed to bob up inside as he bore In to dig his left into Walker's body and throw his right to the head. The bout drew an almost capacity crowd of 10,000, which broke all of the Garden's boxing records for the last two years. Walker had a, nine . p9und yteigbt advantage.. :.. . C-,...ti 'fl '''''''..:,:' ( 'ti.. r de s4v.. ,76 ?' v. - 0 141011.4" Z11-.) t TY :: , .0 .4.1-'44C, , :414,10ell 1 '''-' ,- k ,---- , , b Ylip I ' .C,, q , v4 t, I, 1- ie '1 ' ' 4 - A ', s 6 e P 4 :11 1 tFASulit7:ritt- ,n,' n THE -TRIBUNE'S- TELEPHONE NUMBER is T - ger!r 011C3 - 1 Call this number for quick-action wane eds.-- I ,1 Art r-or 1 4,4 750.40"1 ef; Detroit Pair Victor in The National league team, which put up a battle that was cheered by the 49,000 sans, was as follows: 1Gabby Hartnett, Chicago. , 2Jimmy Wilson, St Louis. 3Frankie Frisch, St. Louis. 4Carl Hubbell, New York 5Bill Walker, St Louis, who pitched in batting practice. , 6Paul Waner, Pittsburgh 7Woody English, Chicago. 8Hal Schumacher, New York. 9Pie Traynor, Pittsburgh 10Trainer Andy Lot:;haw, Chicago. 11Bill Hallahan, St. Louis. 12Dick Bartell, Philadelphia. 13Bill Terry, New York 14Coach Bill McKechnie, Boston. 15Manager John McGraw. 16Coach Max Carey, Brooklyn. 17Chick Hafer. Cincinnati. 18-7Chuck Klein. Philadelphia. 19Lefty O'Doul, New York 20Wally Berger, Boston. 21Bat boy. 22Pepper Martin, St Louis. 23Lon Warneke, Chicago. 24 Tony Cuccinello, Brooklyn. , , , Auwiated Press Photo.' IMajorLeagues1 NATIONAL LEAGUE. . w. L. Pct. W. L. Pct. New York.44 27 .620! Boston ....37 38 A93 St. Lonia..40 34 .541, Brooklyn ..33 3$ .463 Pittsburgh 39 33 .527 Cincinnati '33 43 .434 CHICAGO .33 39 .506 Philaphia 31 43.419 GAMES TOD Y. New York at Chicago. Debtors at Cincinnati. Brooklyn at $t.. L., AMERICAN LEAGUE- ' , W. L. Pet. i W. L. Pet. Washiness 47 25 .053 Cleveland .37 40 .481 I New York .45 28 .616 Detroit ...36 39 .480 Phila'phia 37 36 .507 Boston ....31 42 .425 CHICAGO .36 38 .486 St. Loula..29 50 .367 , GAMES TODAY. Chicago at Phil'obla. Detroit at New York. Wor 1dPs Fair Bridge Meet A Detroit card team. Archie Morse and W. L. Culligan, yesterday won the World's Fair contract bridge pair championship by piling up a total of 478 points in ' the three day match. A Los Angeles team. John Berbtr PinIcts ktallner wa.1 econd. PITCIIEI1S' IIITS ACCOUNT FOR FIRST TALLIES Gomez and Warneke Make Use of Bats. The game of the century at Coma k iskey park yesterday brought together all the great hitters in baseball, but the honor of driving in the first run went to a pitcher, Vernon Gomez of the New York Yankees. His single with two out in the second inning scored Jimmy Dykes and started the American league team on Its way to a 4 to 2 victory. The first National league run also was produced by a pitcher. Lon Warneke of the Cubs, who relieved Bill Hallahan of the St. Louis Cardinals in the third inning, tripled to right in the sixth and immediately scored on an infield out. Babe Ruth's home run with Charley Gehringer on base in the third while Hallahan was having trouble controling the ball, provided the American league with its winning margin. The play by play description of the game follows: FIRST INNING. - NATIONAL Cronin threw out I 7..rtin and Frisch. Cronin then made a one banded stab of Klein's liner. No runs, no hits. AMERICAN Martin threw out Chapman. Gehringer walked. ban threw three balls to Ruth and then struck him out Gehringer stole second as Babe looked at the third strike. Gehrig was out. Terry to Hallahan, who covered first. No runs, no hits. SECOND INNING. NA TIONA LHafey dropped a single just out of Gehringer's reach In short center. Terry singled to left, Haley stopping at second. Berger grounded to Dykes, who stepped on third to force Haley and then threw to Gehrig to double Berger. Bartell fanned. No runs, no hits. - AMERICANSimmons flied to Ber ger. Dykes and Cronin walked. Ferrell flied to Klein. Gomez singled to center, Dykes scoring and Cronin stopping at second. Chapman forced Gomez, Bartell to Frisch. One run, , one hit THIRD INNING. NATIONALDykes threw out Wilson. Simmons went Into right center to pull down Itallahan's fly. Martin popped to Cronin. No runs, no hits. AMERICAN Gehringer walked., Ruth lined a home run into the right field grand stand. scoring Gehringer ahead of him. The ball went on a. line Into the stands. about 15 rows up Into the pavilion. The count was two - balls and no strikes when Ruth took his terrific cut. Gehrig walked. Warneke relieved Itallahan. Simmons bit Into a double play. Bartell to Frisch to Terry. Dykes singled to left. Cronin filed to Berger. Two hits, two runs. - FOURTH INNING. NATIONALCrowder now pitching for the American league. Frisch flied to Simmons. Klein bounced out to Gehrig. Hafey fouled to Dykes. No runs, no hits. AMERICANFerrell flied to Klein. Frisch threw out Crowder. Martial threw out Chapman. No runs, no hits. - FIFTH INNING. NATIONALGehringer threw out Terry. Cronin threw out Berger from. deep short Gehrig drew an error when he dropped Bartell's foul fly the coaches box. Bartell sent another foul almost to the same spot, but Lou caught this one. No runs, no hits. AMEMCANAfter the first half of the fifth National league baseballs were substituted for the American league baseballs. Gehringer filed to Berger to deep right center. Ruth dropped a single in front of Berger. Gehrig fanned on three pitched balls. Simmons missed two strikes and then singled to left. Ruth stopping at second. Dykes forced Simmons. Bartell to Frisch. No runs, two hits. : SIXTII INNING. NATIONALO'Doul batted for Wilson and grounded out to Gehringer. Warneke tripled near the right field foul line. Warneke scored while Dykes was throwing out Martin. Frisch knocked a home run Into the right field stands about ten rows up In the lower section. Klein singled to left center. Dykes threw out ha. fey. Two runs, three bits. AMERICANHartnett catching for the National league. Cronin singled over second. Ferrell sacrified, Terry to Frisch. Avert!' batted for Crowder and singled to center, scoring Cronin. Chapman beat out a bunt to Martin, Averill stopping at second. Klein went to the boxes to get Gehringer's long foul. A verill took third after the catch. Ruth fanned on. four pitches. One run, three hits. SEVENTH INNING. NATIONALGrove now pitching for the American league. Terry singled to left center. Berger forced Terry, Cronin to Gehringer. Traynor batted for Bartell and doubled to :ight center, Berger stopping at third. Hartnett struck out on five pitches. English batted for Warneke and filed to Simmons. No runs, two hits. AMERICANHubbell went to the mound for the National league and. English to shortstop. Gehrig walked on four straight balls. Simmons forced Gehrig, Martin to Frisch. Dykes singled to left, Simmons stopping at second. Cronin fouled to Continued on page Zig poinnua :.1 I LI.. 'll I-IJA-11-1111-i U 1,--1-f-t-1 U LitiLlialLJULIAQ.J) LI-J) L't-J) -,,,,, (-- ' ,1 & '-"". t4011.1 V 1 ,... r:,, 101:4.1.10.1tL.ti 1 ' .so,.,- ',41-;,,,,' (4-) ..m....' ,...,- ( 47'0' , 4,0411" $4 I (Z1r '''-''' ,,V.' 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';4,t, ., 4; 1),re' zi C V , ,.. . . ,.... i r ' 11 .; . ., 16..,N..,'N.,,, , ''. ... 1 1 . .. . 7 . , . 3, , ....4, .,,.., i , ,,,,, r , ..,.rt , .., ,- . ...,,,,.. -,4 .', , . 40 3 r' , ." 4 .. ' "''i-,-'. . f,.--.4. ,..,,- --,t..4 .4, ,-..,v,,c- , . ,. ,, r 2-Isfr' '''''.; ... ,,0"--, -0 -., .. Y'llf- 7:7'07:: elf '"-, "'V j 1,1 0 ,, , ; - : . . - . ,. ' 40 04, r"""),,... , . w7 , ,,04s--.:.;..0'4',Iti .....4-0, ,v....,,.,,' 064 0 1bro ,0.0.0.4...., or,. .400'-44' ' , , .''''','' ' r ' , . . . ' ''; , ' ', : ' :.:". ,,, ,, ,, , , 4WP.1: .,, , , ,' .. . . ' . . ... ,. ... J. , ...:: ,, r ,, r . 1.1,savx.11.A6111,Aa1112112,, j UCIL Ala I. &ILI n at I Ig3 I..LICI JJO. WC; TV 0.0 CP I, OA ,,a , room o.lv, inoune lower, ...noodgo. I ou mdy dibU urger 1Jy ' ' -- -- , McGowan A. L. an imminent thump. , - -18-0-0-0 - - -- broke -- -- - -- w'r w h I c h a II o championship by piling up a tol hall innings; Men' The next most extended effort to " tel crow o i ephone. Call Superior 0100 and ask for Local 466 or 530. . the Garden's boxing records for the Of 478 points In ' the three d it second. am' RIAPI LCAPituts1 cc WO Zliskokkoft 5,I: ' . . last two years. Walker had a nine match. A Los Angeles team. JO - - pound yteignt advantage, -, Berbtr itnfl p4Jalcis )4a1ner wa4 .6c9;, - . , , . . . - . t - , ,,- - , ' , --t i I I . . ring. Nearly JCINCILI seats are avatlable tor bb cents. rved. -, - - , , Omen IMMORP tit I -,.......--..... -Nzss lice, U. S. Pat. Olt ; Crtpyr3 ght.1933.N. by Tile (Near, Tribirnt. ,.

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