Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on June 11, 1933 · 8
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 8

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Chicago, Illinois
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Sunday, June 11, 1933
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VART PAGE - 8. CHICAGO DUBBED 17111DY' FIGHT FOR FAIR OF '93 But City Won World's Applause. , 3Y JAMES' e'DONNTIT;TBENNETT. That the Mustrious Columbian Exposition of 40 years ago was held in Chicago resulted from our victory in a savage competition fought out by four citiesNew York,. Washington. Chicago, and St. Louis. It is one of history's cheerful ironies that the idea of the Exposition, which did more to dignify and glorify Chicago than any other event in its annals, was first taken up by merchants and bankers of New York City. The acerbity of that competition fixed on us our nickname, " the Windy City' "Don't pay any attention." wrote Charles A. Dana day in and day out in his New York Sun, " to the nonsensical claims of that windy city. Its people could not build a World's Fair even if they won ft', , '.1cence the phrase was not, as most persons believe, a characterization of our meteorology but of our citizens. it was derisive. 'That I learned last evening from the veteran journalist, Charles 11. Dennis. From a man less careful in statement I would not readily have accepted it , Not for Our Beautiful Eyes. Not, be assured, pour nos beaux Veils' was the privilege and, the colossal task of building the fair intrusted tn Chicago. Our people laid down a cool but voluptuous ten millions in guarantees and shouted, "We want this Fair! " New York, with a population of nUllions, could raise only five million dollars. Our ten millions plus our location won. as our location always does even unto this daywhen we have an Edward N. Hurley to dramatize it as he did last year to the national committees of the major parties. So, congress said in effect, " Sport, the Fair is yours." Many individual zaembers said precisely thatand in the spring of 1890 came passage of " An Act entitled an Act to provide for celebrating the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, by holding an international exhibition of arts, industries, manufactures. and the-products of the soil, mine, and ee-a-, in- the city of Chicago, in the state-ef 1 Those stately words congress supplemented with an appropriation of a million six hundred thousand dollars, and the die was cast. Soon They Sang Another Tune. When Chicago won, the Atlantic seaboard said. That settles the hash of that The Columbian Fair will amount to little." But they came, and having come they sang another tune. It was a paean to Chicago. Charles Eliot Norton came, the greatest Dantean this country has pro-dared and one of the most austere critics of its ethics and its culture severe and searching not because he was captious but because he was sensitive. fastidious and discerning. He had standards. - - And Prof. Norton, after he had seen the Fair, said to the late Henry B. Ful'er. and Henry afterwards told It to me in an interview. Your Fair, in spite of its astounding incongruities and its broad border of vulgarities, is a great promise, a great pledge, teen. It at least forbids despair. I has, e never seen Americans from whom one could draw happier auguries for the future of America than some of the men whom I saw in Chicago." Franklin MacVeagb, now in his nineties and as eperkling as a pine cone fire, was one of those choice Columbian Chicagoans, and Prof. Norton m-as his guest in the house, now, unhappily, gone, at the northwest corner of Schiller street and the Drive, which, designed by great Richardson, was acclaimed by his colleagues as " one of the architectural gems of the country " and the portal of ,which new one of the , treasures of the Armour institute. , Contrasts Between Then and Now. Chicago's A Century of Progress Exposition to which Americans now are thronging is in its most significant aspects and Its highest beauties Chicago's own production. It was built solely on Chicago's initiative and it is being conducted by Chicago alone. Sixty-eight years ago when 1-71r Benjamin Guinness almost single handed financed the Dublin Exposition the world called it " one man'u triumph." Weil, A Century of Progress is One city's triumph. And like the old Dublin show It is, as to scenic splendors, peculiarly a night show. 'Tis marvelous what. Chicago has done singled handed in building A Century of Progress when you think back I to the cobperation it had forty years ago. Then such a tiny republic as Custa Rica appropriated $150,000 for Its pavilion, impoverished Egypt three- quarters of a million, and so on and on to a total of 49 nations and 37 colonies and provinces epending nearly six millions of government money. , Another outstanding contrast between the old Fair and this one is that the Columbian was largely governed by outsiders.. At A Century Rufus Dawes, Chicagoan for more than half his 66 years, is the whole governing werks. Jolly Tom Palmer of Detroit was president of the commissioners whom President Harrison appointed from every state and territory to organize the Columbian, and Jchn T. Dickinson 1 of Texas was their secretary. There elso were eight " commissioners at ' 0010,10Mailmbonlw ts4 trN111 - 17: 4A'tfi.A 4 414417e kr;,4 '4717,1tji 11 11 0.: so FREE pickup & delivery en 3 AI; Plus. i.ns. 1 411 Truthful -Ad- 9, vertising and I Satisfactory 1 Service Caused 411 91 of Our kti Customers to tIll Return During Hlt 1932. , . or -Mon o -eirroints 1:1C . ) , I -- GOVERNOR :,-- - ept!f : t.-'!. : 's .j - - large," and when they bothered him Palmer would say, "Now, Ns 11 o are you?" 'l.k commissioner at large, senator, as you well know." " Yes, I know that, but whet puzzles me is why you are at large." When Titans NVrought. At the old show if a thing was not good or important it was usually at least BIG. All was on a Titanic scale. The Manufactures building was said to be three times as large as St. Peter's in Rome, and it took eleven flat cars to bring the section of a California redwood tree across the continent to the United States government's pavilion. When it was hollowed out a family could live in it. But at A Century an entrancing little diorama in colors tells you more about redwood trees than the huge actuality of 40 years ago did. Diuramns, although invented more than a century ago by Daguerre, are indeed a seperb novelty of the new Exposition. Another inspiriting contrast which A Century provides is the layman's the little layman'sdelight in and comprehension of the marvels in the Electricity building. About all that average laymen knew in '93 of electricity's applications was telegraph, telephone and are light. But these boys of today! They bend over electrical devices and working airplane models and say, " You see, it's this way, those valves connect with this part, and that produces a" and I cannot follow them a step further, so intricate and swift is their discourse. Our City the Supreme Contrast. The most dazzling contrast between '93 and '33 isour city. We had then one-third our present population. We had no Oriental museum with tireless Breasted annualil bringing to it treasures of long vanished civilizations. We had no Shedd aquarium, no Adler planetarium, no Stadium, no outer drives, no Duck-Ingham founta4n, no Tribune- Tower, no El Greco, no Mundelein college, no downtown campus and cloisters of Northwestern university, no International house, no Loyola university, no Rembrandt. no Historical Society building at all comparable to the beautiful new treasure house in Lincoln park, no stone-terraced and finest civic water front in the worldStockholm's Is not finerand no skyline which if R ebtont,non flW It by riebt In PrirIR Ameica's Finest Piano THE MASON & HAMLIN musically the most beautiful Piano the world has ever known. Chicago's Greatest Value Tilt CABLE MIDGET GRAND Of name worthy musical qualitiesencased in figured mahoganyfull 88 note scale. Now priced $300 less than any new Cable Grand previously offered. Only GRAND S $445 taken in Mason over and Whitney $195 Melville Clark 265 Chickering 285 Reproducing Grand 365 Piano Company 301 So. 'Wabash Arc.. at Jackson STORE OVEN - EVENINGS DEDICATES ILLINOIS trade on new Hamlin. Coot-Cable rhinos. : t or Berlin or Rome would make him gasp with wonder and delight and exclaim, " Titans built that!" We had no Field museum covering eleven acres, containing collections valued at sixty millions and viewed every year by 800,000 children, an Institution, in brief, ranking as one of the world's four greatest natural history museums. We had no art gallery housing the Greco. the Rembrandt. the Renoirs and the Picassos, and drawing a million visitors a year We then had only one statue by, the greatest sculptor that ever worked in the western world. Saint-Gaudens: now we have three. We then had nothing by the puissant and tempeetuous Gutzon Borglum: now we have two of his works--one of them the daring bronze of Sheridan. - - The Midway Then and sow. Quaintest of all is the contrast between the Midway of '93 and that area vhicii links Jackson and Wash legton parks as it appears today. One side of it now is the majestic mile of the southern front of the University ef Chicago; then both sides of It were two miles of "all the jolly fun of the Fair, as the bank holiday costers may on Hampstead Heath. During the summer of '93 the stockade of the ostrich farm of the Fair stood just about where the towers of International house now rise, and the " spiel" of the barker for the ostriches was one of the rhetorical triumphs of an exposition which was not deficient in that commodity. Thus it ran, that spiel of the Ostrich barkerand In sharing It with you I should add that Phoebe Couzinsi for whom " the lahge ostrich " was named, was an extremely contentions membPr from Missouri of the Fair's board of lady managers and was always in the newspapers: Good peopleKindly give me your attention for a few moments. and I will tell you some facts about the ostrich. The ostrich is the bird of which you have read so much in books of history and travelCome In, come In, and bring the little ones!--It Is mentioned alao In the Holy Writ, and altogethah presents one of the most curious and intereetin manifestationa of nay-chah in the orientCome in, come in, and see the ostriches!For see them you will as they live and nave their being on the sun bnked desahts of .!CHI(A'(4-0 Vf,,MEE.MOFFOS .., Ha,:ST; HOUSE ri 11. l'.14!1i 1410 is 1;j1:.Zr th gs.-',drk a.""ovit, 2.1 TALF...110 P , t -,' VIPS4 OM' -ett , 110;,..:agy.A44-1:1 .11.1111.tallarlik.ZAkowdliolhoAdlibdio.011, :k 1 Gov. Horner is shown speaking at the dedicatio n of the Illinois Host house at the World's Fair yesterday. In the front row with the governor are M is. Paul Steinbrecher (at left), Mrs. John Cornwall,' president of Gold Star Motheis' organization; Mrs. Herbert L. Stern, the governor, Allen D. Albert, representing Rufus Dawes, and Lieut. Gov. Donovan. ' ITRIBUNE Photo. far away Africa. Alive, alive, alive, all aliveCome in and bring the little onesPtemembah they are alive, all alive. Their strange habits. their rich plumage, their eztra-or-di-na-ry powah will all be made known to you in the twin-kiln of an eyeCome in and bring the little onesYou have read of their tre-men-dl-ous ' strength enablin' them to knock down a lion with one blow of beak or claw. And here they arealive, alive, alive, all alive! In concludin' my lect-chah, ladles and - gentkmen, I have great plez-yah in announcin' that PHOEBE COCZINS, the lahge ostrich, has Just laid an eggCome in, come , in, and bring the little ones. The Men of Those Days. Looking back to certain of the limitations of the Chicago of those days and its relative lack of opportunities for the general cultural happiness of the people. I would sar that by contrast the grandest feature of A Century of Progress Is Chicago. 'rho Chicago of the overpowering skyline and of the treasure houses of art. of science, of history, and of research. But, whatever we lacked in '23, by golly we had MEN. In 1S02, when plans were afoot for a children's summer home at the Co. lumbian, whimsical Charles Dudley Warner, author of "Being a Boy." wrote thus in the Board of Lady Managers' IZemembrance book, which I have seen: " III the child is the father, or mother, of the man, the children ought to have a home in the Colutn Wan Faire so that they will know how to treat their grandparents in the greater World's Fair which it will be their privilege to organize." What. thon. wore. yam Cohlrnhlan grandfather. and grandmother like? , Grandfather and hie colleagues who won and who built, that Exposition were also .,the, initiators . of many of those treasure houses and free cul- tural opportunities which are now the . glorST of our crty: They were magnificoes.. They bored with a big auger. Some of them were merchant princes; some were founders of mighty Commercial house's and vast Industriesthat served not only, this country but the world. They were not bevied by " managing directors." They did their own managingoften with a ruthless hand: Some' were patrons of Richardson and some had their wives' ; portraits painted by Carolus Duran and John Sargent. They were laconic builders and not blatant go-getters or blick lawyers battening on receiverships. Apd they loved their city with a pasaion that never knew abatement, although it sometimes was a shade alloyed with a self-interest which indicated that they had an eagle eye for their personal advantage. They Love Their City. But in spite of that they loved Chicago and idealized Chicago with the ardor of a youth under the spell of his first romance. To Mayor Carter Harrison the elder. who was laconic only when asleep, they left the wording of their passion, and Carter filled the bill. saying once to a cheering multitude at the fair " Our young city is not only vigorous but she laves her beautiful limbs daily In Lake Michigan and comes out clean and pure every morning." Nobody snickered. Unquestioning devotion to Chicago was more general then. Back to me from that Columbian summer come memories of great personalitlea. That was it!those men had personality. I was a. young reporter, full of bounce and fresh as paint, but with just sense enough to listen heedfully when the big guns spoke. There was Lyman Gage the banker, to whom the successful financing of the Fair was due more than to any other man and who afterwards was a great gold standard secretary of the treasury under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt, and Thomas B. Bryan, another Colirmbion director, courtilest man who ever received a timid reporter, and Charics'll.tWacker, also a director and then stirring with his first visions of " the Chicago Plan." There was William J. Chalmers " the laird "founder of a tremendous Industrial plant, and looking then, as now. like high-domed Sir Walter Scott. Ile was only 41 at the time of the Fair, but he had the courtliness which people called " old school." It was not. It was Dooct school, and it never grows old. At 81 be still has It. praise be, and be must be among the last of the local Columbian directorate that helped the national commissioners build and govern the Fair. The Tribune's MagnMco. Joseph Me was the city's Journalistic thundcrer and the Fair's most powerful and judicious exploiter. Ile carried an ear trumpet and was supposed to need it. Some declared that it was his protection against bores. Ile could be stone deaf to them, but, be assured, he could hear with desolating results if anybody tried to take advantage of the alleged infirmity. There was Frank Logan, discerning and generous friend of the Art institute, as he still is, and who wore impassioned waistcoats. Ile wears them still. Princess Eulaile and Prince Hyphen. And Hobart Chatfield Chatfteld-Taylorl As consul for Spain in Chicago and as the local Ward McAllister he was official wrap carrier and master of ceremonies at the Fair for blonde Infanta Eulalie, who came to represent the Spanish regency. Although only 28 years old he was engaged In an earnest etTort to lead the world of fashion to the higher life. There was no chance, and finally Mr. Chatfield-Taylor ceased futiling around with "society." which, he discovered, did not want to be saved, and wrote monumental and authoritative biographies of Molit're and Goldoni upon which the governments and learned societies of both France and Italy have bestowed honors. The life of Goldoni, Indeed, is so highly regarded in Italy that it has been translated into Ital, Ian. So, although " society " went its wanton way, all ended happily. Ile was, and is, good sport and very gal. lant gentleman, and the reportorial ribaldry about his hyphen grew tedious. Ile came honestly by It Could not escape It, in fact, without losing a rich legacy. Who of us, under the circumstance', would have trip(' to? ..11.,.1NMIta Sensational New Williams OilO-Matic . horizontal single-unit Water Heater saves 1.3 to 12 and gives you PLENTY of hot water at the turn of a faucet, day or night, winter or summer, at constant temperature, automatically! Come in and see it! -,..- - Small Down Payment : s ''') ,,, 1 4 Easy Terms 7.' WILLIAMS OIL-O-MATIC 5 ' HEATING CORP.- - cpyo'l1' ' , 185 North Michigan Avenue c , NI . . State 8057 47' ,, 520 Davis St., Evanston .. Greenleaf 2300 Wilmette 2311. . 11,L11101S SIIIIIIIE' TO HOSPITALITY OPENED AT FAIR Horner Dedicates tate's Host Building. BY JAMES O'DONNELL BENNETT. Beneath the benediction of that Most august and thrilling eight on the World's Fair groundsthe glowing Rotunda of the Regimental Flagsthe Illinois Host building was dedicated by Gov. Horner at sunset last evening in the name of the one hundred and two counties of the commonwealth. Well might the Rev. Dean Charles Whitney Gilkey of University of Chicago chapel say in his noble prayer of consecration: "Here may the plain citizen remember alike our past achievements and our present shortcomings, and receive a larger measure of public spirit and devotion. " Here may the public servant renew his allegiance to the common good; and here may both citizen and official alike enlarge their understanding of the world of many nations and races and faiths in which we would learn, 0 Father, to live together in peace and good will." And the People Echo "Amen." "Amen,' said the preacher and all the people asembled within and without the state's shrine house to hospitality softly murmured Amen, amen." The reverend dean prayed that " here might the hospitality of Illinois be as open handed and open hearted as her open prairies and as refreshing to thoee that are weary or discouraged as is the breeze that suddenly draws In from yonder blue lake." entehinc UT) Dr. Gilkey's nrst. 14nv. KE Here we have listed a few of the great values taken at random from our enormous stock from which you will have no difficulty in selecting your rugs at the prices you want to invest Come in and see. FORMERLY Meshan 14.2 x10.4 $1,050.00 Kandahar 28.4 x12.0 2,100.00 Ispahan 20.3 x12.3 1,500.00 Ispanshah 10.11x12.6 1,450.00 Sparta 19.7 x14.0 1,050.00 M;hrlban 20.6 x12.8 1,100.00 Kirman 15.9 x11.9 1,200.00 Keshan 20.6 x11.9 2,250.00 Ispahan 30.2 x16.0 3,250.00 Litahan 20.11x12.5 1,150.00 Sparta 18.0 x13.0 875.00 Ispahan 19.9 x15.5 2,150.00 Sarouk 17.8 x 7.2 873.00 Sparta 22.0 x 8.1 475.00 Ispahan 20.5 x10.3 1,150.00 Ispahan 13.3 x 9.7 585.00 Sarouk 20.10x12.5 2,000.00 Laristan 22.0 x11.10 1,450.00 Ispahan 15.8 x10.2 685.00 Mihriban 22.3 x12.9 1,450.00 Sarouk 25.0 x12.5 2,300.00 Ispahan 12.0 x 9.0 423.00 Chinese 12.0 x 9.0 325.00 Sarouk 12.0 x 8.6 525.00 Sparta 11.9 x 8.2 325.00 KIrman 12.3 x 8.8 525.00 Keshan 12.2 x 8.7 625.00 Chinese 10.0 x 8.0 275.00 Ispahan 10.8 x 8.0 323.00 Sarouk 14.1 x10.4 975.00 Sarovk 17.0 x10.10 1,250.00 Sparta 14.3 x11.10 750.00 Arai( 21.0 x10.10 975.00 agar 15.9 x10.3 750.00 Ispahan 15.0 x11.0 700.00 NOW 5485.00 785.00 585.00 825.00 400.00 335.00 575.00 C85.00 950.00 485.00 375.00 850.00 395.00 225.00 495.00 265.00 795.00 550.00 293.00 485.00 795.00 195.00 145.00 195.00 145.00 195.00 255.00 133.00 145.00 425.00 545.00 285.00 345.00 365.00 315.00 ANTIQUE AHD SE111-1111111QUE Aubusson 11.0 x 8.11 $873.00 $285.00 Hamadan 13.3 x 6.8 475.00 185.00 Sereband 10.7 x10.4 450.00 195.00 Shiraz 19.8 x 9.6 1,250.00 525.00 Hamadan 23.9 x12.4 1,750.00 435.00 Tabriz 18.0 x11.5 1,500.00 375.00 Saraband 16.5 x 7.0 800.00 , 295.00 Meshed 12.9 x 5.6 165.00 80.00 Hamadan 11.7 x 6.4 375.00 145.00 Mountaza 17.8 i12.1 1,450.00 475.00 Bijar 19.0 x 7.4 1,200.00 425.00 Gorovan 18.5 x11.5 850.00 385.00 Ispahan 18.4 x11.6 2,250.00 935.00 Sahend 14.5 x10.2 950.00 395.00 India 14.9 x12.10 950.00 365.00 Khorassan 13.2 x 8.0 650.00 225.00 Kashmir 11.10x 8.8 425.00 185.00 Gorovan 12.0 X 9.0 325.00 155.00 NIIGilLoO Horner. In the speech which formally transferred Architect Herrick Hammond's exquisite creation to the Exposition authorities, said that the name of Illinois - had - from earliest 1 times been synonymous with hospitality. Frenchman, Spaniard, and Briton all had enjoyed it, and, speaking with peculiar tenderness to foreign born citizens grouped before him, his excellency said: "And you from faraway lands have found that here you were not regarded as strangers but as new citizens of a state which Is big enough and heartily ready to provide room and livelihood for all, a state where assurances of freedom from racial and nationalistic prejudices are not mere gestures." Prolonged applause. The Governor's Great Moment. ArOt mere gestures. Henry liorner's voice was deep with feeling when he said that, for he is living proof that within our borders those blessed assurances of freedom from prejudice are not " mere gestures." The governor spoke at considerable length, largely in welcome to the world and in tribute to State Architect Hammond and other Illinois officials who have looked sharply to it that this building should honestly represent beauty and convenience instead of governmental waste and loot. They succeeded. The richly appointed but not grandiose structure cost $80,- 000. The Illinois building at the Chicago World's Fair of forty summers ago cost $600,000. It was grandiose being a bad copy of the bad state capitoland It also was wasteful and ugly. 2,000 AVords Versus 130. But the whole spirit of what Mr. Horner said In his written speech of 2,000 words is tellingly compacted in the 130 words lettered in gold on a black tablet which greets you on the right as you enter the radiant Rotunda of the Regimental Flags and which Henry Horner also wrote: Thus it reads:, "Illinois. as host state. welcomes you to A Century of Progress Exposition to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of Chicago, its great metropolis. In the dawn of the city's second century the outlook of the world brightens anew. With prospects Indicative of the immediate return F----- --- - - ' :.-;-'-:- -- . of a normal flow of trade and corms merce, we may anticipate a still greater development of those arts and sciences, the progresg of 'which is so remarkably presented to us here. and look forward to a people's welfare reassured an dhappiness increased., We of Illinois sincerely--hope that the celebration of this century's precious gifts to the happiness and comfort of mankind may be a glorious symbol of victory achieved over the seyerest economic maladjustment of the last one hundred years. HENRI' HORNER, Governor."' 1Tis a pity all public officials do rot have to write on tablets. It so merck fully compresses their flow -of words. Sunny Weather, Sunny Words. The dedicatory ceremonies were bright with sunshine and happy faces and they were enlivened with musie by the American Legion's Board of Trade Post band, which is a daisy. Dr. James Weber Linn, secretary of the Illinois commission, full of fun an diffusing fun, presided, and he proved that thirty years of university professorship need not make a man either sepulchral or smug. In the name of the Exposition's authorities Dr. Allen AThert, the isliegara of Optimism, accepted the building in a speech which showed that we all are certainly on the way to bright Beulah land. - Neighborly Day for One and AIL Pretty pageantry emblematic of the spirit and the ladies of 18:13, of the period of the civil war, of 1893 and of 1333 was vouchsafed by Mrs. Bond Lowe, Miss Betty Blair, Miss Marcella. French family; Miss Louise Neff, and Wise' Francis Ashley Deneen, grand. daughter of Charles S. Deneen, former governor and senator. While night was drawing on .thousands viewed Lorado Taft's impressive "Lincoln the Advocate " within the house, the copy of the parlor in Mr. Lincoln's Springfield home, the priceless documentary and pictorial treasures of Lincolniana, and the just finished and speaking portrait of Gov. Horner by Sister Mary Stanisla of the School Sisters of Notre Dame. It was a neighborly evening for one and all. Mrs. Carter 'Jamison, Mrs. Frank Logan, Mrs. John Cornwall, Mrs. Ilerbert Stern, Sister Mary Stanisia. and Mrs. Albert Steinbret her were among the hostesses who helped to make it such an evening-. Continues to offer greatest Rug values of a generation ) $1,500000 Stock Being Liquidated at 12to Regular Value 1 11-11 Perhaps the most magnetic force that is makinz our Emergency Sale so successful is the high quality of the Oriental Rugs being offered at such radically reduced prices. The circumstances which prompted us to give this sale are known to all those who have read our previous announcements. However for those who have not, I will state here, briefly; we are forced to meet payments on our five-story establishment at 169 North Wabash Avenue. It is an Emergency situation with us, so we have marked our rugs at prices that will sell them in a burry. Every piece belongs to our regular stock, for this reason we accept our usual responsibility for every rug sold. 4144403 hrs Xal'At Sarouks Sarouks Litahans Lilahans Chinese Chinese Dergazine Dergazine 7.0x4.0 5.0x3.6 7.0x5.0 5.0x3.6 4.0x2.0 5.0x3.0 5.0x2.9 4.0x2.6 Purchases made for future use can be stored and insured until delivery at no extra cost. Special arrangements can be made for extended payments. $77.00 45.00 57.50 - 28.50 9.75 26.50 14.50 11.00 Let Us Clean Your rugs for your neelth and for the greater charm of your home. Our cleaning and repairing of rugs are unsurpassed. Franklin 8011. , , , , Exclusive Dealers in Oriental Rugs ferForty-three Tours. - - - 169 NORTH WABASH AVENUE JUST NORTH OF RAIIDOLPH kl 11111 ensational Nt horizontal sir lviii save 1111 - and gives you VN I previouy ouercu ra iunti sl ILPIlly winter -$445 turn ot a faucet, day or nght, win or sum- .- tllyi i . -MATIC --- GRAND'S . - . taken In trade on new Mason li Hamlin. COtt ' mer, at constant temperature, automaica , d Cable rhinos. , 285 I I 365 ,..,. , I , fi it4c, . ,, ..,, ,..,,,,,,:, .,,L ' . Come in and see it! ....,-k-s---- ' ."-- ---.7.v.--- ,- , ,,:. ' Small Down Payment , WILLIEAL HEATING CORP;- - , k, A Whitney Y 'CI. ' k ever an 321961 i kt . t t . e e Clark , ,' Chiekering V A Reproducing Grand tk ,, ,,,, cA:a 11,, ,, L'i I . I',' ' 1)- )) v , v, , - , ,It :; 1 ,,, 0 0.--, , 15 . s - - or t. s: ToTerms 'A ,,,,,,.,, somm.rewomTim.Bmstzlit. ' )11 1 7' .., All'. -,-.- , ,4 State 8057 b, ' . 185 North Michigan Avenue ''' '''4,'' ' SO1 So. 'Wabash Ave.. at Jackson 11, pi,' 1 . , , , ,,,,V , . sor roERNE,,i.: , L..,,,,,,,....;:t.:.: ,,, ,:':'. .: . ,::,..141:1 9 lf,1, , . ,,, Piano Company WP IA ,- f ' 4, , ", , o 520 Davis St., Evanston .. , Greenleaf 2300 Wilmette, 231,1. , .-::'- "; Ny.,, MA ',?.. EVENINGS . , A.-:',!:1.04:. ir '''TfifilitAcYX3 .., - -' -'lla.6, Okt ,-,.d 1 iTo - 4. , ,o -, , t, Waw ( . - eluoua 1...... 4 1 I 14- , A,,tr -7.-41.1- !iny ,:4'',.-t,''. .,,ii-i-,.-f-'1'2) -1,..77 , . ) . ''.,, yl N.-!.,,:x, ''-, . . ..,v,0'7,, ,,. i 'k's,,, s . Ni, 14:; h....t,- lore''.i,77.2 1!::, -:: !, Atil, ,i .2,..........., ''''':1:'4.-..:4,,,.,,'IkA,. 4. j",t' , i:-....-...2.;,:3'4,,1. 'Z' i.:37,,,-.;.:, ::-, 4. 1 A ' ... . liA lir, 1 01' vi AT E R t HT414?:i.,10 ' ,. , , r ,... ..... , 1., 0,'",- .---- ,",-'-',,-.--z.'-,"' 4C , ....":".' "'"---z-,.----:-.2-te..e.i,;'' "-: ., .11; . ,- , . , - , - - , , - . 4 sicti11,. 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