Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on December 21, 1913 · 6
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 6

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Chicago, Illinois
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Sunday, December 21, 1913
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6
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6 "CARDIFF GIANT" ON ITS WAY HOME Stone Hoax of Century Ago to Fort Dodo-v. 1011a. PURCHASED FOR 10.000. Heirs and Claimants for Years Fought Over Possession of Image of Man. The " Cardiff Giant is on its way home. The great one ten stone hcax of half a century ago is being taken back to its native gypsum fields at Fort Dodge. Ia. J. IL Mulroney, a public spirited citizen of Fort Dodge. who was in Chicago yesterday. 1. consummated the purchase last week from E. S. Calkins of Syracuse, N. Y. The con- sideration was $10.(4,4). Ext ept for a possi- I ble trip to the San kr anCiSCO expesition. the gypsum carving will remain an object of interest at Fort Iaidge, where the gypsum Industry is represented by eleven mills. Object of Praise and Fights. Volumes of argument and prose and reams of rhyme were-written and sung about the figure. It was indorsed and denounced and affirmed and condemned. Tne discussion of ! its authenticity disrupted the opinions of 1 arcLmologists, geo.ogists, and petrifaction- ists, as well as the equally argumentative I minds of lay families. Thousands of dollars were collected from 1 exhibitions of the curiosity and almost as much was expended in legal tights over the ownership of the valuable money getter. The real story of the origin of the great I fake came out in 190a upon the death of I George Hull. the man who conceived the i idea. After a long search for the proper kind I of stone he found a huge block to answer his I purpose in a gypsum bed near Fort Dodge, i Ia. That was in 1867. Confessed to Hoax. 1 Hull. in his confession of the hoax. said he paid an Italian sculptor by the name of G. Frabisco Lala to carve from the block the gigantic figure of a mane apparently in the throes of extreme pain. The marks of the chisel were removed by the application of steel brushes and acid was added to give an appearance of age. Securely packed and marked " machinery." ! it was shipped to Union. N. Y.. in the fall of 1S6,3 and was taken in a wagon at night to the farm of " Stub " Newel. near Cardiff. Newel and Hull were cous.ns. The giant 1.as buried on the farm and a crop of ! grain planted over the spot. The following year when Newel invited neighbors to help him dig a well on the spot the giant was i " found." The claimants and heirs of those claiming I Interests in the fake. numbering 160. fought I for the curiosity by injunctions and restrain- 1 ing orders and other methods of legal pro- I cedure. AS a result the giant lay for thirty- ! eight years in a warehouse. until it was put up a stierifts sale for the storage bill. up at a snerifts sale tor the storage bill. The stone image was bought by Mr. Calkins of Syracuse from whom it was last week purchased. i Life Saving Station closes. 76-; Life Saving Station closes. The South Chicago station of the 1:nited States live saving service. at the foot of East Ninety-second street. closed for the winter yesterday. Capt. Angus reported that with his crew of eight rnen he had saved thirteen persons. The Man --His Christmas Gift There need be no question about what to give the men folks this Christmas. Here in our showing of fine dress accessories are there many articles which are sure to highly gratify the recipient. The admirable manner in which Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen Clothing combines style, healthfulness and durability reniers them gifts of unusual worth. All articles are manufactured of the finest and purest sheep's or camel's hair wool, without any admixture of linen or cotton or trace of noxious dyes. Glance Over These Gift Suggestions Men's Bath Robes and House Gowns made of Camel's Hair Velour and extra fine woolen materials. Men's Pajama Suits. Men's Knitted Waistcoats. Pure Wool Sweaters and Jackets. Men's Knitted Caps. Wool and Camel's Hair Slippers, etc. Camel's Hair Blankets, pure and dyed. We aviil gladly send our attractive catalog upon request. Sanitary Woolen System Co, 126 N. State Street Chicago I The Tribune again will undertake this year the work of putting the Good Fellows of Chicago in touch with the children who must look to them or have no Merry Christmas. Plans for securing the names and addresses are complete. If you cannot play Santa Claus yourself, The Tribune will do it for you. But you will miss the spirit of the thing if you don't do it yourself. And do it early. To join the Good Fellows. write a letter to The Tribune something as fellows: " live at No. street. I will be Santa Claus to (any number you wish) children. Please give rne the names of the children in kz.:tate what section of the city you prefer to have assigned to you.) "John Jones." Your letter will go to Santa Claus. F:e will indorse it with the names and addr7:sses of the children. The letter will be remailed to you. There will be no publicity. Then you get busy. That's all. A WORD OF ADVICE TO GOOD FELLOWS all a doll because Rosemary will break my doll if she doesn't get any. Rosemary is the baby and she is 2 years old. I would like to know if you ere going to give me anything? I have no father aud any kind of a thing will do for me at all. wILL you please not forget us this year as I wrote you last year, but I suppose that you had too many children to look after. There are six of us children and my oldest sister is 8 and I am 10, and my mother cannot do much work and my father is sick in the hospital for a year and anything you give us will be appricitted. I hope this will rich some good fellow. As we have eight children and my papa is not working since two months and we won't have no Christmas present. And I will remember you in my prays. Will you please bring me a big doll and a pocketbook where I can put a 5 cent piece and some hair ribbon and my brother Charlie wants a drum. I thought of writhing you and asking you for a few things for they children my husban desertd me and i annot able to buy them anny thing so pleas beso kindley and send them a few things. They are four children. ...- WILL you allow an older kid to ask for something? I want a place where I can earn as much as 6 or $8 a week at some light work that I can do in a sitting position. I am 49 years old, well educated. have been sick but am now fast getting well. I am a little girl with my pa dead. I go to school every day. My mother is not feeling well and they is 7 in the family. Will you please bring me some toys for my brother and a little baby. 6 months old. Please (L ,The Tribune Again Good Fellows' Agent ' .....,.. A ib,, 2 n &At . -:,------t,- Yt k 41 dtw (Qoaltinued from first page.) ' do not forget my mother, bring something for herself. I am sending you a letter and we all want something. Mary wants a doll and Ray wants a horn and a fiddle and Willie wants a sled and a gun and I want a blackboard. Good bye. T HOPE you will come to my house. My 'mama said we can't think of Christmas for there are so many things we really need and can't get and she could only pay half the rent this month and there are 7 children and i am 12 years old and i can't go to school on account of heart trouble and i hope you won't forget us. Our ma died two years ago and our pa had to board out with us. We all three found board and loggin with a lady and in a few days our dear pa disipered and we have not heard one word from him since, so I guess we are orphands. The lady sends me and Clareme to school but she can't buy us no presents for Christmas and we are offal anxious to get some boy Scout uniforms. 1 am a little good girl. I want 1 slate, 1 pare stockings (mama's size), 1 doll and 1 trunk. WILL you please be so kind and help a poor family for Christmas. My husband is laid up for the last four weeks with a broken leg and I have 4 children and none able to work and I can't work myself because I am sitklyWouli you please send us something for Christinas? Our names are Bessie and Agues and Gertrude and Kate and I am 11 years old and we have a stepfather. We are poor people and can't afford Christmas this year. We will not have no Santa Claus because my father makes just enough money to pay for our meals and he has to support a def and dum aunt and an old grandfather, who are here and have no home - 1 THE CHICAGO SUNDAY TRIBUNE: DECEMBER 21. 191. ONO. JOE MULHATTON DEAD---OR JOKE? Prince of Liars Whose Stories Amazed Nation Report ed Drowned. ONCE "KILLED" HIMSELF. lie "Located" Star of Bethlehem and a Meteor Which Slew Thousands. St. Louis, Mo.. Dec. 20.--(Special.jAdvices have been received from Kelvin, Ariz.. to the effect that JoeMulhatton was drowned there this week. He had been in an insane asylum at Kelvin for a number of years. He was 62 years old. As Joe once before reported his own death It is possible that his " drowning " may turn out to be a joke. As a unique, ornate and bewildering liar he has a reputation extending from Maine to Texas, and even extending across the Atlantic to England and France, for the newspapers of those countries have been sadly taken in by the Mulhatton stories. Nominally, he was a traveling man, but lying on a tremendous scale was his specialty. Starts with Terrible Meteor. Perhaps the most notable work was the story of the meteor, supposed to have fallen In Texas. Under his vivid imagination and facile pen, this meteor landed in Brown county, covered an acre of ground. destroyed all the ranches for miles around by reason of the sulphurous fumes it gave off. and was still sizzling its way into the earth when he gave the story to the newspapers. That glittering invention sent a trainload of newspaper reporters and scientists into the mesquite bushes of Texas. They never located the meteor. but the railroads and boarding houses and ranchers with horses and guides to let did a thriving business for several weeks. , What this able liar called his " great national joke " caused quite a turmoil in 1876. He proposed to remove the bodies of Washington and Lincoln to the Centenn:al exhibition, and expose them to view at 50 cents a head. With the money that should be thus obtained he proposed to complete the Washington monument Star of Bethlehem "Located." At the suggestion of a newspaper man at Lexington. Ky., Mulhatten located the Star of Bethlehem. Among Mulhatton's friends at the time was John M. Klein, a hardware I dealer of Richfield. Ky. Mulhatton dubbed him " professor " and described him as a WAIVNM?4M 3 Azl I You can search the whole world over and not find another gift that will bring so much pleasure to every member of the family Victrola This Christmas From Special Xmas Terms on Victrolas Pay Nothing DownFirst Payment in February There is no reason why you should be without a Victrola this Chr;stmas. We will deliver the Victrola whenever you desire itto you or any party you designate. We prepay all delivery charges. Pay nothing down on the Victrola. Pay only for a few Records of your selection. Payments do not begin until 30 days after Victrola is delivered- Balance in small installments Victrolas $15 to $200. Terms $5 a Month Up. Victrolas Ordered Up to 5 o'clock, Dec. 24th, Will Positively Be Delivered for Xmas. OUR ENTIRE MAIN FLOOR IS DEVOTED TO VICTROLAS The i'udolph Wurlitzer Co. successful observer of sun spots and an astronomer of remarkable attainments and high scientific reputation. According to Mulhatton's story it was Prof. Klein who had discovered the star. The late Richard A. Proctor, the eminent English astronomer, was in the United States at this time. Unfortunately for him he didn't know about Mulhatton. and he burned with zeal to save the American public from the paths of scientific error. So he devoted several columns of labored writing to an exposure of what be termed a humbug. He said that there was no such thing and never had been any such thing as a Star of Bethlehem, and if there was such a star it could not have been discovered at Klein's observatory, which was quite true, as there was no such thing as Klein's observatory. 0, See the Invisible Moon! During the summer of 1888 Mulhatton. with the aid of a mythical Prof. J. N. B. Bird-whistle of the equally mythical Lawrenceburg Academy of Science, discovered an invisible moon. the bulk of which was about two and a half times greater than that of the visible moon. while its distance from the earth was only about 30.000 miles. " Its influence on our tides." wrote Mulhatton. on our atmosphere, our crops, and the great storms must be very great, and will in a measure account for the cyclones. tornadoes, and hot and cold waves that sweep over the earth. It makes its orbit in a path diagonally between the earth and the sun, in such a position. caused by the autes powerful attraction, as to be invisible except the upper edge, as it occasionally skirts our horizon during the months of July and August." Then the romancer went on to say that Prof. Birdwhistle had telegraphed the discovery to Prof. Swift of the Rochester observatory and Prof. John M. Klein, the noted astronomer of Kentucky. and had received a reply from the latter stating that he had bought instruments to bear upon the western horizon at the indicated point. and that he. too, had gazed upon the invisible moon. corroborating Prof. Birdwhistle in every particular. The invisible moon careered visibly through the newspapers for several days. The Golden Calf "Discovered." Mr. Mulhatton then turned his attention to things terrestrial and got up a mound sensation, in which he told how a golden calf had been discovered and tables of stones with inscriptions On them. It was thought that these were copies of the original Ten Commandments. Mulhatton once concentrated his powerful Intellect upon the domestic goose, and the result was a highly detailed and interesting account of a Texas cotton plantation kept in order by a flock of trained geese. The geese carried under their necks gourds filled with water so that each goose could drink out of Its neighbor's gourd. Each goose did the work of two men in weeding. The story concluded with the prediction that " if the farmer's experiment is as Eucc ess ul as he thinks it will be. it is only a question of a few years until the whole cotton crop of Texas will be weeded out by the ordinary goose." This was regarded by many newspapers, particularly in the south. as an Important agricultural departure. 329-331 So. Wabash Avenue 4tBnetdwrann.hatsorenn Victor Salesrooms on First Floor. Enormous Stock of Victrolas. 'BUGS' TO CELEBRATE YULETIDE' BY HELPING 600 POOR FAMILIES Armual Christmas Dinner and Novel Production Will Be Given at Chicago Athletic Association. Tuesday evening at the Chicago Athletic association the " Bugs " will give their annual Christmas dinner and novel production, " The Bugs in Toyland." Enough guarantees of donations and contributions already are assured to warrant the statement that the Bugs " will take care of nearly 600 families, provinding food, clothing, and fuel not only for Christmas and the holidays but for the expected cold spells in January. " Big Bug " F. W. Wentworth and his assiziants have arranged a program for the Christmas dinner said to be the most unique In the history of the Cherry Circle organization. Following the dinner there will be a presentation staged before a nursery chimney, in which the " Bugs' " Santa Claus appears. Chairman C. B. Cone of the charity committee and the women's auxiliary have investigated conditions among nearly 1,000 poor families recommended for charity and have planned to send boxes to more than 500 families, as well as orders for fuel. MORE TROUBLE FOR LANDLORDS Minnesota Court Holds Them Itespourlble for Illness of Tenants' Employes Caused by Poor Heating. St. Paul, Minn.. Dec. 20.That a landlord Is liable for the health of a tenants employ as who become ill through insufficient heating of a building is the decision of the state Supreme court. Well introduced is' HALF SOLD Tribune ad is the best introduction BERMUDA 48 Hours Frost to Flowers If you have never visited these Islands of enchantment. now is the time to plan. Special Steamship Rates and Inclusive Tours will be continued throughout January. Book now. Turn to page 8. part 2, and read full particulars. Special Prices for Three Days YOU who have waited until the last days before buying your Christmas gifts, need all the help you can get. You'll find plenty of help here, and to make it still easier for you we are making special prices for the next three days. Every store is calling you and unless you are careful you'll buy something that you'd never buy if you took time to deliberate. Come here to a store full of good and useful things, any of which is sure to be acceptable. In order to give you every possible opportunity we are including in our specials some splendid bar-gins in Oriental Rugs. - Queen Anne Sewing Table, solid mahogany $38. Mahogany Magazine Rack 27, Elizabethan Oak Smoking Table 45. Revolving Tea Table 50, Antique English Mahogany and Cane Arm Chairs and Rockers ' 30. Verde Antique Table Lamp with Amber Glass Dome Shade 27. Ebony Inlaid Man's Chiffonier 145. Mahogany Dinner Gong 20. Solid Mahogany Tea Wagon 25. Gold Table Lamp with Antique Chinese Print Shade 55. Mahogany Gate leg Tea Table 33. Solid Mahogany Book Trough 19, Solid Mahogany Secretary 98, Antique English Mahogany Humidors 17. Inlaid Adam Tea Tray 12. Pair of Sheraton Electric Candle Sticks, Bead Shades 32, Antique Brass Table Lamp 12. Sheraton Magazine Rack 14, Adam Single Light Table Lamp, Rose Silk Shade 21. Antique Copper Jardiniere . 20. Sheraton Card Table 65. Revolving Book Rack 13. Solid Mahogany Cellarette with Nickel Plated Electric Fittings ' 138. Adam Mahogany Writing Desk 26, Solid Mahogany Hand Made Sewing Table 25. Japanese Basket Jardiniere 4. Mahogany and Cane Muffin Stand 17. English Mahogany and Cane Adam Book Case 70. Fumed Oak Cellarette 42, Solid Mahogany Candlestick 7. Reversible Top Adam Bridge Table 30. Mahogany and Cane Tea Tray 20. Mahogany and Cane Fernery 15. Old Blue Chinese Vase 22. Cylinder Drop Leaf Tea Table 45. Antique Brown Mahogany Hepplewhite Sewing Table I 28. Imported English Walnut Charles I I. Chair 40. Oriental Rugs Regular Price $38.00 27.00 45.00 50.00 30.00 27.00 145.00 20.00 25.00 55.00 33.00 19.50 98.00 17.00 12.00 3100 12.00 14.00 21.00 20.00 65.00 13.50 138.00 26.00 25.00 4.75 17,00 70.00 42.50 7.00 30.00 20.00 15.00 22.00 45.00 28.00 40.00 Regular Special ' Price Price Royal Kermanshah, 12.10x8 10 $375 $237 Royal Kermanshah, 11.60.2 345 235 Royal Saruk, 10x6 10 265 175 Khiva, I 03x8 127 82 Also a lot of very fine Belouchistans, Bergamas, Royal Kermanshahs, Saruks, Princess and Royal Bokharas. Regu . larly sold from $12.50 to $125, special price $7 to $60 Scholle Furniture Co. 121 South Wabash Avenue 4 Between Monroe and Adams Streets Special Price $15.00 17M 22.50 39.00 20.00 13.50 98.00 14.00 16.50 38.00 25.00 10.00 65.00 14.00 9.00 19.00 8.00 8.00 15.00 10.00 45.00 8.00 115.00' 21.00 15.111 2.50 10.00 49.00 31.00 5.00 2100 14.00 11.00 12.00 38.00 15.00 20.00 -a 0 0 Enormous Stock of Victrolas. vf,.4 IT- 4 - - 0 ,f jr iY , I , 4c -10 , , , , , iF ) '11 y --::r t N '. , '4 -.. -,.........................................0 . 1 J.42:4 --'----- - ---- - .'" - . e . s . ,, .... , -,,,47------------, ,.L. .. -,, ..--,,,,,. .,- .),,,- 41, 1 ..01T) - t. , ,--- Pf ; , . -., lb' g,- ,,,: ' , -,,i,, tt,:.,,,r,m,..,:-.)4 ,.,, ci.: .,4; , to. b ,,,;- ,,. Loe: 111.:-.t. A -,, ,,,,,, . ,t-siAr F .., i , -v , - e- , ,r -- - ; t t ,' - v. ir .- -, -8 ..,,,, , ..., ..... -,,,,t.. .t k '16- ,'N, -o,;0. "" - ' j r., . . ...' 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