Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on October 4, 1925 · 21
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 21

Publication:
Location:
Chicago, Illinois
Issue Date:
Sunday, October 4, 1925
Page:
21
Start Free Trial
Cancel

I ....w' ter)rtd. PART TWO I !WORTS PIA ZKIETS I for City Series. CLEVELAND All It EHT131313SHSRP Farrri. r1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Lee.d. .. .40000001 L.swort,It-40000003 j. as. 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 '2 Incole. lb 311110011 Srtrrpon, 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 lice3m).31,--31001000 Myatt.c ..40240002 P 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Totefi 30 2, 7 9 3 1 CHICAGO .ma . OM NO. 21 cog LYONS AS sox iiEi, 9-2 Sox Star Qualifies I NO. 21 FORTED I A 0 0 0 E I 0 0 0 i 2 0 0 0 7 0 2 0 1 0 00 10 ABRBHTBB13HSbP A F. Moffitt'? 4111101200 11,0oor. of.-- 3 1 2 5 0 0 1 0 0 FlOtrt .. . .20000'00100 Bar,.tt, 2?). 4 0 1 1 0 0 0 5 5 0 h,fLr, 311.21001210 Falk, If 4111000100 Kamm 3b 3,124100130 Day.6.6s '-'00200"" 0 5,1111E. c.. .... 1 64) 0 0 0 0 1 430 1 2 3100000 Lyons, P Z1000 1 0 1 0 'rotate 30 9 10 17 6 1 1 17 13 0 Certand 000 trZO 000-2 Cal,ato 100 042 02-9 Two base bitilSbeely, Crouee. Three base bibMyatt. Kamm. 110nle runHooper. outLevsen. 2. Rases on ',rim 15: LyOnll: 13; Miller. 1. Double rlay4BarrPtt-Stwely: Spurreon-.L Kende: Davis-Barrett-Sheely: Snurgeon-Kno1e.1 PitoLet-sett. 6 in 5 23 innings. Hit ID; rfrberLeveen I Lynne UmniresMoriar. ty, Evans. and Hildtbrand. Time-1:32. BY JAMES CRUSINBERRY. Ey beating the Cleveland Indians yesterday at the south side in the neat to the last game of the season, Young Ted Lyons turned in his twenty-first victory of the season and no longer can be spoken of as a mere boy in baseball. Tbe Sox bagged the game, 9 to 2, and after the fifth inning, when the gang tallied a cluster of four runs, it teas a simple breeze for Mr. Ted. The youthful Sox slab star, not only aas after his twenty-first game, but lie was grooming himself for the city series against the T Cubs. He needed just such a game with which to top off ;ind now he is all topped off and primcd and ready to face the north eiders, probably on Thursday of this week. He pitched air-tight ball in seven of the nine rounds. All told he allowed sere blows. Three of them, with a pass, came in the fifth, when the enemy tallied Its two runs. But in that pinch. with two on and only one out, Mr. Ted called upon his reserve strength and hurled himself out of trouble. He was a trifle wild in the sixth, walking two men and allowing a scratch hit, but no one scored because Ted's mates rescued him with a double play. S Passes Help Sox. Most ofthe effective punching of the Soz in getting their nine runs was dine by Harry Hooper, Willie Kamm and Buck Crouse. Many passes Issued by the Cleveland pitchers proved advantageous hi piling up the' score. 11001,0r socked a homer into the right bleacher in the firstinning and a ;single In the fifth that sent two mates home atter which he retired to allow Mr. Eish to get a bit of practice. The slabbing for the enemy was done by LeVSen and Miller, two aspiring c,lltg" men. Levsen was good until the fifth. Ile was knocked out in the sath, Miller finishing the game. Heetter's homer started the Sox Off fya,nt but the Indians took the lead :n the fifth with their two coiters. In the same round, however, came the lge With one gone, Davis and Crouse walked and Lyons was hit by a Ptcbaa ball. Mosta walked. forcing Davis borne and Hooper drove Crouse n d Lyons In and sent Most!' to thrid 'wa a single. Barrett fanned after , ll Hooper and Mostil started a double ettl. harry was headed off but wasn't tagged before Johnny Another Sox Rally. ,,aLe!Irs pass and hits by Falk and aanirri filled the bases in the sixth "eel), tallied while the Indians t4r11e,1 a double play on a roller by ritYln. Crouse then drove Falk borne t'th a double. Kamm opened the Nlith with a triple and Davis walked. erwse brought Kamm in with a single 1)avis scored while Mostil was r'ng tbrOwn out after Lyons bad pro a sacrifice. .- lhe final game ofthe season will 14ace today and Red Faber is :4ttd to burl. MISSOURI AND ' WANE GAME ENDS IN A TIE Orleans, La., Oct. IUM--; 4;Olug under a blazing sun, Missouri .4'Tu1ane fought out a 6 to 6 tie here "141Y, The forward piths was the de-factor of the contest. A 30 yard ri effort placed Missouri inside To nye yard line In the first period. tl.e touchdown was then a matter .sof t)verzealciuslo-;sei tyll the-part of the ,ThGurt Valley champions gave the ("erivacliejan, opportunity to tio the )'nl'e in the becond period. A Missouri 't1Ick nterfered with u. Tulane end as re-ichd for a pass On the two yard The Interference gave the hall to .jJe rai completed pass, and the "cbdrivrn followed on the next 10134Ir 1 Lewis Stars as Purple Beats Coyotes, 14-7 WITH BAKER OUT NORTHWEST. 141. 1 SO. DAKOTA 171- R. E Fti,her.!Zellopher. Christman I Deklots R. T . Johnson 'Nichols L T. 1 inner i R. G.... Rahr. Cohen Diehl T. G. C Lowry (C. MerrVe (C. C 1,6..Ross. A .Schuier ! M airnun. ;64 anders.R.G. L. T. g tehenmain.'Malone R T. R. Schuler 1 L. E.. Seidel. -Mathew': Harney, Redekl. R. K 1 noble. Ryan ....Q. 11. i Q. B... Solheim. Ft uw-h Funston. R. B..... White. Fox I Sturgeon 1 IT. !Clancy R H. L. 1.1 . . Griffith. Christman. Boy i k;Dunkek ....,.., ..... r B. V. II Lewis. Froelich I Tnuchdowns White. Cbristmar4 Barney. Goals from touebdowmLeiris, 2: Nichols. RefeeeeEldriere Michigan. Um pips Li ps ki Chicago. Field judro:MeCord I Litnots L. Bead linesntanM orton Illinois. 1 tr) BY IRVING VAUGHAN. o 0 o 1 7 0 A little thing like lack of experience 2 0 O 2 1 o couldn't stop the Purple yesterday. O o 0 0 ' They were without the finish of a 0 1 1 0 , - -- ! seasoned machine, but they had power 0 24 13 0 p and determination0 and that was I cm)ugh. E. Much of the power and determina O tion was concentrated in the 200 pound 0 hulk of one Leland Lewis, and mainly 0 through his effort the Purple was 0 n able to inaugurate its grid campaign O with a 14 to 7 triumph over the South o O Dakota Coyotes, before about 18,000 O on Northwestern field. (:) Close as it was, however, the scorl O doesnl tell the story. The Purple never were in danger and the Coyotes O paraded in earnest only once. That e was when they scored their touch down that came as the result of a e long pass uncorked while the Purple , warriors apparently were pondering ! over a severe penalty Just inflicted bcr . i cause White, half back, had been ob- served in the act of being unneces I - sarily rough with an opponent. Lewis Versatile Rack. Lewis' coming out party found him a versatile fellow who may be heara from in the future. In his first conference battle he showed himself a kicker, a passer, a. runner, and a plunger. The big item was his line smashing and time and again he pounded through the center of the wall for anything from one to fifteen yards. No other back could match him, the closest being Griffith, who sparkled In :spots by scooting around the ends or inside the tackles. It was Lewis who paved the wa3. for both Purple touchdowns. A long pass heaved by him started the first one on its way early in the second period. Late i nthe same quarter he inaugurated the march to the other score when he ripped Into tackle for twelve yards. Long passes did the resL Coyotes' Attack Fails. Those two successful sorties were Nortleivestern's only evidence of sustained attack. Except or a chance at a goal kick they never again came close. and meanwhile the Coyotes were punting at every opportunity as their only hope to stave off their rugged foes. The Invaders' backs simply couldn't make an Impression on the Purple. Northwestern's first touchdown started early in the second period when Nichols made one of the many necessary Coyote punts. The ball rolled out of bounds in midfield. In the first play Lewis charged through his left tackle for live 'yards. Then a pass, 'Lewis to Seidel, sent the lat. ter charging diagonally across the field to the one yard line, where a Coyote nipped him. Lewis swung back into action and tried to span the gap with a drive at center, but failed for one of the few times during the struggle. White then carried the oval across by diving through the right side of the Dakota line. Lewis kicked goal from placement, giving Northwestern a lead of seven points. Start for Second Score. Several minutes later Lewis tore off his twelve yard gain through the wall. That put the ball in midfield. Ile added five more in a similar smash, and White followed with four. Next came penalties and losses and the Purple was back in midfield, but a long pass. Christman to Fisher, put the oval back on Dakota's 23 yard mark. Christman and Lewis slipped through the line for gains aggregating nine yards, and then the Purple again resorted to the aerial attack. White heaved the ball to Christman, and the latter raced over the goal line. Lewis again kicked goal for the fourteenth point, and for the rest of the afternoon the Purple seemed content to concentrate on defense. An intercepted pass put the Coyotes on the scent of their lone touchdown. The third period was well along when as pass- from White was Intercepted by Dubel on Dakota's 33 yard line. on die next play White was banished for getting his football and boxing mixed, and Northwestern was penalized half the distance to the goal. On the first down Funston shot the ball to Harney, who had a clear seven yards to the goal line, and he went over with nobody near him. Nichols kicked from placement for the extra point. Front this point on it was just a seesaw battle of penalties, punts, and substitutes. The sole exception was an attempt by Leals to kick a field goal from the nineteen yard line late in the fourth period. The kick was blocked. Cedar Rapids High Downs Fart Madison, 19-6 Cedar Rapids, la., Oct. 3.---1Speciall --Wahllingt On High, dibplaying the tight that made the team famous last year, defeated Fort Madison, 19 to 6. today. The game was played In the rain : c-Ng ,,,0 ,..0 The brilliant leadership of Ed Weir, Cornhusker captain, his kicking and his mastery of his team on the field, were important factors in the 14 to 0 victory scored against illinois yesterday. Badgers Plunge and Pass to 3,0 to 0 Victory Over Ames Madison, Wis., Oct- 3.-- Specia1. A new type of Wisconsin ,team came on the playing fie'ld of Camp Handali stadium here this afternoon and before a record early season crowd of 13,000 howling Badger fans swamped the veteran Iowa State team under a 30 to 0 score. Held scoreless by the gritty Ames eleven in the first quarter. Coach Little's eleven early In the second period uncovered a dazzling attack of running and passing that scored two touchdowns before the bewildered Iowa eleven could begin to halt the onrush. A steady march from midfield brought the Cardinals into position to score their first touchdown. After Leo Harmon had crossed the line, the ball was called back because both teams were off-side. Crofoot Scores on Pass. Leo Harmon threw a long pass to Crofoot, sophomore quarter back', who ran twenty-five yards to cross ' the Iowans goal. In the third period the Ames team entered the contest with determination reborn from their rest at half time. Then for a time they decidedly outplayed the Wisconsin squad, throwing pass after pass over the heads of the Cardinal secondary defense. It was not until in the final round that the Badgers gained their pace again. First points made in the final period were chalked up when four Badgers leaped upon Hall behind the Ames' goal and earned two points on a safety. This pittance proved a spur to the university team, for on the following kickoff their forward passes, mixed MIDDIES BLANK W. & M. ELEVEN BY 25-0 COUNT Annapolis. Md., Oct. 3.--4.0--Navy's heavier team offset the tine aerial attack of William and Mary college today. and the middy eleven defeated the southerners. :5 to O. Navy's first count came in the second period when Hamilton intercepted a pass and sprinted 69 yards to within two feet of the goal line. Two plays put the ball over. Shapley kicked goal. In the last quarter Shapley dashed 80 yards for another touchdown. The Indians fumbled, Navy recovered. and a pass from Hamilton to Taylor behind the goal line counted again. A William and Mary punt blocked on their own 12 yard line paved the way for the final score. No goals were kicked in this period. ARMY oGRIDDERS ROUT DETROIT U. BY 31-6 MARGIN West POint, N. Y., Oct. 3.--UP)-- Old fashioned, football colored with flashes of aerial warfare carried the Army to a victory over the University of Detroit team here today, 31 to 6. in the cadet's gridiron inaugural. The new forwarl line of the cadets. backed up by a sturdy an dexperienced backfield, presented an impregnable front to the Detroit warriors. who were compelled to take the battle into the air. Their forward passing attack brought a counter fire of long tosses from the Army, Interspersed with powerful plunges Into the line by the broad shouldered Harry wil eo.u. veteran West Point back. L THE SUBS APLENTY I wisCoNSIN I 301. AmES I 01. 1.11 ... , BurrusCoo .,. .. L. E. R. T Strauble. 11Cingery L. T. Debaven, Vasa Ile Galbraith. Watts R. G..Sauger. Spiess. Thomas L. G. Idueorge. Carney Thornburg C C. Wilson. Wilke Rosiness. Thomas. L. G.... 310Cormiek. Watts R G Van Bremer Mayer. Gri mes. IA. T.. Nelson Kekaw R. T. L. EPolaski. Cain- Bop& Mayer R. E. eron. Christensen. J. Behm. Weiss. lAring. Blackman E. Hill Q. B. Q. B.Croloot. Goodland'N. Behm L H. R. H D Harmon. IFisher. E. Hill, Larson Crawford. L. H. Radke. dean- Woodhull R H. drews. Barnum. Hall B. Rue!. Krenz P. B...11adke. L. Harmon. Bartlett. Wiswell TouchdownsD. Harmon. Crofoot. Radke. Cameron. Points after touchdownsD. Harmon 4. RefereeMasker Northwesternl. UmpireHaines (Yale. JudgeTaylor (Kansas State. Head linesmanEgan (Grinnell). with occasional end runs and off tackle plays, regained effectiveness. Score Twice More. Leo Harmon tossed a long throw to Cameron, a sophomore, and the latter eluded Ames' back for the third touchdown. The last score of the afternoon came shortly after, when Radke plunged over the Ames line after three successive 'trials. Though Little's men showed occasional greenness that is unavoidable in the first game of the season, their performance today rates them in the advance guard of the trek to the 1925 Big Ten championship. Today's game was singularly lacking of penalties, but a couple' of 15 yard assessments were made for holding while offside fines were equally rare. !Mai or S NATIONAL LEAG w. 1 Pet- W. E. Pct. Pittsburgh 04 57 .6231Bosten .....70 83.438 Nett York- -86 66 .566 CHICAGO -68 85 .444 Cincinnati .79 72 .52718rooklyn ..68 85 .444 St. Lonis .76 76 .5001Philade4 a -.68 85 .444 YESTERDAY'S RESCLTS. Chicago 7; St. Louis 3 Philadelphia 8-3; New ..... 1-0 Boston 5; Brooklyn ... Pittsburgh at Cincinnati; no game. GAMES TODAY. St. Lenin at Chicago. Pitthburgh at Cincinnati. Benton at Brooklyn. rttlintilphia at Neor York. m , AMER1 CAN LEAGUE. W. L. Pct.! W. L. Pet. Washington96 55 .636; CHICAGO..78 75.510 Philadet's 88 64 .11791Clest4and .70 83 .458 bouls...82 69 .1543; New Vork.69 85.448 Detroit 73 .5201Boston ...47 105.309 YESTERDAY'S RIMULTS. Chicago 9; Cleveland ............ 2 New York 9; Philadelphia .. 8 Other gamma postponed; rain. GA3M5 TODAY. Cleveland at Chicago. Detroit at tit. Louis 121. Chiladelphis at Washington. WORLD'S OCTOBER 4, 1925. American Named Captain of Oxford Soccer Team Chicago Tribune Press rerrv1ee.1 LONDON. Oct'. 3.R. W. De Koven. an American has been chosen captain of the Oxford varsity soccer team. He is the first American ever to bold this position. De Koven is a student at 1 Pembroke college. Oxford. GREATEST I'J NEWSPAPER COLLEGE FOOTBALL RESULTS EAST. Tale, 53; Middlebury. O. Harvard, 18; Rensselaer, 6. Prinreton. 20; Amherst, O. Pennsylvania. 26; Swarthmore, 13. Lafayette. 20; Pittsburgh, O. Peon State, 13; Franklin and Marshall, O. Columbia, 47; Johns Hopkins, O. Union. 0; St. Lawrenee, O. Cornell, 26; Niagara, O. tzyraetise. 26; Vermont, 0. Colgate. 60; Clarkson, 0. Nay. 25; William and Mary. 0. Muhienberg, 2i; Albright, O. Boston college, 6; Catholic U.. O. Haverford, 19; Susquehanna, 7. George Washington, 32; Jtilanita, O. l'sew York U., 23; Connecticut Aggies, O. Williams. 6; Bowdo In, 6. Brown, 33; Colby, 0. Furman. 20; Washington and Len, 15. West. Maryland, 7; Rhode Island State, 0. Gettysburg, 7; Le 4tigli, 7. illanova, 20; Rutgers, 0., Georgetown, 19; Mt. St. Mary, 13. Geneva. 24; Westminster, 0. Buffalo. 2; Toledo, O. W. a J, 7; Marietta, O. Temple. 19; Upsa la, O. West Virginia. 6; Valid Elkins. O. Dartmouth, 34; flobt:rt, O. Artily. 31; Detroit. 6. Wesleyan. 7; St. Stephetut. 6. Mass. Aggies. 19; Bates, O. Cushing, ; Exeter, O. Holy Cross, 9; $t. Johns. 6. Delaware. 16; St. Joseph's. 6. Dickinson, 6; Lebanon Va Bey, 6. Carnegie Tech. '.'27; Thiel. 7. Hamilton, 8; Rochester, 0. Kenyon. 17; Ashland, O. Fordham, 20; Providence, 6. N. Y. City college, 15; N. Y. Age', O. Springfield, 50; Cooper Union, O. W'Orcester Tech., 6; Trinity, O. Bucknell, 13; St. Bonaventure, - Blue Ridge, 22; Gallaudet, 6. SOUTH. Titian 6; Missouri, 6. Louisiana State. 38;,-Southwestern, 6. Spring Hill. 7; Alabasms Normal, O. Chattanooga, 12; Cumberland, 7. Vanderbilt, 41; Henderson Brown, O. Georgia Tech, 33 ; V. M. I., G. Virginia, 7; Georgia, 6. Ogelthorpe, 7; Howard, 6. Florida, 24; Mercer, O. Roanoke, 30; Randolph Macon. O. Tennessee Medical. 19; Ling college, 1-1. Rice, 7; Sam Houston Normal, O. Wakeforest, 7; Davidson, 7. i Tennessee, 51; Emery and Elenrym, N. C. State. 13; Duke. O. Georgetown, 19; Mt. St. Mary, 13. Citadel. 27; Rollins. O. North Carolina. 7; South Carolbus, O. Richmond. 7; Lynchburg. 5. Lenoir-Ryne, 9; Milligan, 2. Auburn. 13; Clemson, O. Louisiana Poly, 6; Mississippi coller,e. O. Texas Christina U.. 12; Daniel Baker, O. Texas, 25; Mississippi, O. Mississippi A. 31., 27; Millshaw, O. - WEST. Nebraska, 11; Illinois, O. Chicago, 9; Kentucky, - Northwestern, 14; South Dakota. 7. Michigan, 39; Michigan State, O. Indiana. 31; Indiana Normal, - Ohio State, 10; Ohio Wesleyan. 3. Vilsoonsin. 30; Iowa State. 0. Minnesota, 25; North Dakota, 6. Wabash, 13; Purdue. 7. Iowa. 26; Arkansas. 0. Notre Dense. 69; Lombard, O. Bailer, 6; De Paula. 6. Drake. 6; Washington. O. Beloit, 40; Northweatern college, O. Lawrence, 12; Oshkosh. 0. Stevenpoint. 22; Northland, 7. Columbia., college, 14; Wisconsin Mines, 6. Winona Teachers, 7; Stout, 6. Oberlin. 9; Baldwin Wa lbsee, 6. Wooster, 11; Case. O. Creighton. 0; North Dakota Aggies, 0. Cornell, 3; Grinnell, 3. De Paul. 7; Fort Sheridan. 6. Millikha, 3; State Normal, O. Bradley, 6; Kalamazoo, 2. St. Louis U., 0; Springfield Teathers, O. Superior, 32; Eveleth, O. John Carroll, 0; Quaatice Marine, 0. Western Reserve, 10; Hiram, 7. Charicton, 6; Lutheran, O. St. Olaf, 7; St. John, 0. American 'college.-7; Crone Jr. college, 0. Marquette, 14; St. Mares, . Winona Teachers. 7; Stout, 6, . Wooster, 11; Case, O. Knox, 34; McKendrie 0. Simpson, 0; Nebraska Wesleyan. e. Kansas. 13; Oklahoma Artless, 3. Monmouth, 7;- Coe. 6. St. Norbert. 33; Ripon. 7. Wittenberg, 13; Denison. 7. Mount talon. 12; Heidelberg. O. Miami. 17; Georgetown, O. Muskingum. 26; Capitol. 6. Lake 1'orest, 13; Y. M. C. A., 0. Marquette, 14: St. Mary.. O. Augustan. 26; Vi heaters. O. IflInohi college. 0: Lincoln. O. - Western Illinois Teachers, 0; Carthage; O. Kansas Aggies. 15; Oklahoma. 0. Klantsarn W.Ieyan, 11; Missouri Wesleyan. 9. 1 Emporia Teachers. 13; Hays Teacher, 3. Haskell. 33; Tulsa, O. Bethel, 9; Friends, 7. Southwestern, 20; St. Johns, 11. Milliken. 3; Illinois Normal. 0. , 1 4Ar"W ' EIS W - ,tecr4,: - The relentless smashing of Rhodes, Nebraska half back, and finally his sensational 36 yard run to the Mini 4 yard line brought him into the limelight of the season's football glory yesterday. Rain Postpones Women's Golf Title Match BY MORROW KRUM. Clayton. Mo., Oct. 3.-- S pee A heavy rainfall flooded the golf course of the St. Louis Country club today ! and caused a postponement until to-1 morrow of the final match in th4 women's national golf championship between Miss Glenna Collett of Providence, It I., and Mrs. Alera. Stirling Fraser of Ottawa, Ont. The match, originally scheduled to start at 10 o'clock this morning, was first postponed until 2 o'clock this afternoon and at that hour it was again put off. Never before in twenty-nine, nounced that the thirty-six hole final Will start at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning. it will be played, rain or shine. There will be no further delay. rlayerS Have Slickers Ready. Miss Collet and Mrs. Fraser had pre. pared for the battle today. Both had heavily spiked shoes, umbrellas, slickers, gloves and heavy towels ready. Each was prepared to brave the storm. The announcement of the postponement gave them no cheer. " I'm sorry." said Mrs. Fraser. "I wish we could start now." Miss Collet was also disappointed. a Anything the officials say is all right with me. but I am ready to go now," she said. Dopesters assert that the delay had given Mrs. Fraser a better chance of winning than she had early this morning. Last night the betting favored Miss Collett. It was argued that she has the greater strength and is better fitted to go the thirty-six holes than Mrs. Fraser, although they would be equal in an 18 hole match. Bleachers Crash and 7 Are Injured at Oklahoma Tilt am Tulsa, Okla., Oct. 3.--(10----Seven persons were injured and a score more received slight bruises when a temporary bleacher erected for the Haskell Indian-University of Tulsa football game collapsed this afternoon while more than 1,540 spectators were waiting for the game to start. Haskell Indians won the game, 33 to O. Harrisburg, 19; Carbondale, O. St. Tlator, 49; Northwestern toilets, 0. Northern Nortn.si. 53; Canadian Soo, 0. Buena Vista. 14; South Dakota State, O. Washburn, 0; Ottawa, 0. Elgin Jr. college, 39; Miseaton Fresh, O. FAR WEST. Southern Calif.wnia. SO; Pomona, O. Gantams. 45; Mount St. Charles. 0. Oregon, 0; Multnomah A. A. C., O. Oregone Agzies. Al; Willamette, O. Western State. 13; Colorado Mines, 5. Washington State, 9; Montana State, O. Colorado. 23; Montana State. 3. Colorado College, 0; New Mexico, 0. Colorado Aggies, 31; Aegis. O. Washington, AO; L. S. S. Oklahoma, O. Washington State, 9; Montana. O. Denver T., 13; Colorado Teachers, 0. California, 54; Nevada,, O. Stanford. 20; Santa Clara, Wyoming, 31 ; Kearney Normal. 0. . AMA ,V9V4,,SPaM BY HARVEY T. WOODRUFF. The University of Chicago displayed its 1925 Maroon football merchandise yesterday to 32,000 cash customerei the largest opening day attendance roons had nine points and Kentucky had none. - Strangely enough, coaches and players of both elevens were sat. isfied. Chicago partizans had expected a larger score, but they had not ex pected such a stubborn defense. They had not expected to see thirty-threc individual Maroons take part in the fray. Stagg not only was willing to show his goods. but he was willing to take them off the shelf. Maroons' Defense Strong. That was possible because Kentucky, while putting up a creditable and game defense. was lacking in an attack which could gain consistently. One would not call it Kentucky weaknessalthough Coach Fred Murphy, once known to Chicagoans as North-western's mentorsaid his team was not prepared for such an early game, but because Maroon defense traditionally matures faster than its attack. So, with the danger rninimizede, one suspects that the Maroons, while displaying their remnants and new stock, did not unroll them for full inspection. Intricate plays there were not. Simple formations prevailed, and simple 1 formations only gained enough for the women's national tournaments has!Maroons to win -comfortably-. such a postponement occurred. s Even the "comfortably" was de- Rain Descends All Day. layed. Chicago twice lost the ball on The rainfall started before daylight downs in the first half with a touch- idown looming. Its firsts points came today. It continued until noon, when only in the last minute of the first there was a slight cessation. At 1 half. It was Bob Curley againthe o'clock the torrent was again descend- slight, curly haired Curley who was responsible for the Maroons being ing and officials of the United States I Conference champions of 1924 with Golf association rave up all hope of I drop kicks which tied Ohio State and playing the match today. j defeated Northwesternwhose toe Sand traps were filled with water. I gave his team 3 points. Curley Boots Dropkick. Fairways were soggy and slippery. ended immediately afterward. Chicago 5s lone touchdown came in the third period. It was a march down the field from Chicago's 32 yard line, except for two occasions when the march was changed to a charge. These two were runs by Stanley Rouse, whose performance was the most brilliant of the day from a. ground gaining viewpoint. His first quickstep was for 23 yards on a clever butback to Kentucky's 44 yard line. Then Drain. Rouse, and Timme added fourteen yards in three downs, all through the line. Timme, Rouse, and Timme picked up eleven yards more in three tries for another first down. It was Chicago's ball on Kentucky's 19- yard line. Rouse Scores Touchdown. Then Rouse again twisted and whirled through the opposition tackle and guard on a cutback play for 14 yards, and the ball was on the 5 yard mark. Timme plugged center for two. McKinney was checked on an end run after gaining a yard. Then Rouse , swung around his own right end for 1 1 the remaining distance. Drains attempted dropkick for the additional !point struck the crossbar and bounded lback into the field. That was the final !count. I 'When Chuck Duval, the much hts'r'aided heaver for whom Maroon fans ' have been waiting two years, was in1 jected into the fray with Chicago in possible scoring position in the final period, the west stands set themselves for another touchdown. Chuck did not , hurl a single pass. Wyisiting scouts expected to see anything, they have yet to see it. After the game Stagg laughingly aenied he had issued instructions for Duval not to attempt passes. But, anyway. Duval did not pass. Chicago Has Good Team. Chicago looks like a good eleven. sineyes, tenpositions seem well inhabited when the first string boys are on watch. Center is still a question. Onlookers could not form definite conclusions because so many varying combinations were used. Stagg evidently wished his reserve strength tested. Even when Duval was not in the g.ime Chicago attempted forward pztsses and executed enough of them, simple as they were. so that one does ot ex pect to see opposition safety men p drawn up only fifteen yards behind their own scrimmage line, as Wisconsin played in the final game.of last season. Yes. Chicago has a good team. We must reserve decision whether it Ilaa a, great one. A r A.D 'Heitman. LPN i K. Itizie. B:lutm ,n C i f.' ataik(er. aloney C. n .....Hitiben. Wo Wert. Becker... R. G. Re T 11enderson.1 FAl wards It. T. Cochran. Alwin: Schulte. L. La mix A pita! It arhold R. E. Q. B....Abbott. CU rley. NIahney. Tracey Q. B. Drain. Dyrertl R. H McKinney. Hughes, Evans...L. H. D. Rousel L. H ...... Kern went. ' Smith. Phipps... R. H. McKinney. Duval F. B NI 'Carty. loss. Garrick.... F B. Francis. McCarty TouchdownS. Rouse. Goal from field Curley. RefereeJoe Mar idsohn Michigan. UrtipireW. C. Knirht ( Michigan Yield ludreC. Dorticos Maine. Head linesman A. C. Sereiling Indiana. BY HARVEY T. WOODRUFF. Brit ton L. T....Grable. Conley i The University of Chicago displayed L. 114...liassell. Sutures B. Gallivan. its 1925 Maroon football merchandise I q Hall. Freneh H. Y1 .Leonard Green! yesterday to 32,000 cash customersIL. H ...Grange the largest opening day attendance Ste,wart F. B.... Dauaberity. in Midway gridiron history. Kentucky 1 Greathouse , . , a s . , a .,, ,..... Sprague. La,A14011, moommonwomoommonemmenbAnomommoonsemainoillitia,0111611111111ftirrt 8 PARTS Part, 41,-- one Rm. m else. - A intim". F.--wamo A4 bt ota., 7C ono 116 ombialogio a4.104 Or. Poenes. - illiarcKnisPid !GRANGE HELD to 9 to 0 Win OverColonels HELPLESS BY GO CHICAGO I CORRIUSKERS cHICA GO 191 I KENTUCKY Oh R. L....Clark. Yetaier.lKirman. Todd E. eponoutr h R. T..Hobschettl. Scott.1 R De ck Haven L. T. 'M Bor'n Cammack. n. NPff. Van Meter L.. G. uddy field Slows 'Heitman. LP. LSI Open Play. 1 I . TAMING OF RED 1 1 ILLINOIS (01. I NEBRASKA 1141 LE Muhl. 1 :Meintyn Smith. Drake Efi Wetr IC I L. T. i R. 1r..lteeder. .Marritter Rata,11.. Pooptati L. ti. R. G..34uekce. Cooliete Li titrig,.t. C Itlittertwarner. I Weatouphat . C. Reit.,h schoiz ... ....It. 4 i 1 L. Ce Wiekhorat. Stiner. Randall. R. T. furnished the blue-Jersey opposition 1 Tou,hdownt.---DaiLy. Rhodes. Goals af NI ti(u C"hiil.lad n ;o"l.9.r11n;Ip'An l'ee 2S ehiklsom.rtit'ererr I Cl...h'ike'a.r0 or"4.111 1 Field judgeCol Mumma (Wesit Point. head swhhaedn enlionsei n points 0 time mt se ac came, eK, ethe n t u 1c lkay- and, 1,,,I ,,lt,,,,,,,,h ..m.,,,, ,,,,,,hom 1 hneswanJay Wyatt iNtiatiourtl. Champaign. IlL, Oct. 3.ISpecia1.1 By taking advantage of a poor piece of football on the part et Il line's in the opening quarter, and by playing a strong defensive game afterward, Nebraska defeated Illinois this after. noon in the presence of 40,000 pvt. Itators by a score of 14 to O. In the first quarter Illinois elected to forward pass In its own territory. Capt. Grange tried to hurl the oval to one of his ends. but the ball sailed into the hands of Half Beek Frank Daily of the Cornhusker team, who ,ran 38 yards for a touchdown. 'nodes kicked the goal, making the score I to O. The visitors were content to work on this margin. They played the game absolutely safe by kicking on third downs and taking no chances with advancing the ball except by, punting. In fact. Nebraska did not ,make a first down In the first hale, excepting the run which resulted in the touchdown. Grange Can't Get Started. Capt. Grange and his teammatre tried valiantly to even the count the first half. The heavy rain of ift&t night and early this morning- left the footing insecure. Grange was unable to get started on any of his long runs.-- and was frequently nailed as he reached the scrimmage line. Illinois tried hard to complete forward passes in the first two quarters, but with. out success. In the second half Coach Zupplte - -- - - - Tees were squashy and uncertain, and I Curley's dropkick yesterday was I threw all his strength into the game. , from a slight angle while standing on IIIis team apparently had been given the green were partly flooded. Good i i Kentucky's 35 yard line. The oval instructions to try everything, and the golf would have been impossible. Any ' I sailed between the uprights and Chi-1 players certainly did. Forward passes sort of golf would bate been difficult cago had scored, dulling somewhat the I were hurled with reckless abandon,. and unpleasant. I enthusiasm of 300 Kentucy rooters 1 Capt. Ed Weir and his teammates ex. , I who came on a special train from Lex. pected just such an attack. The line At 2 o'clock it was officially an-t ington with their band. The half rushed the passers while the sec. nounced that the thirty-six hole final ended immediately afterward. ondary defense covered the eligible re-will start at 10 o'clock tomorrow morn- Chicago5s lone touchdown came in ceivers. The Illini did complete some ing. it will be played, rain or blithe.. the third period. It was a rnarch passes, but not enough to get within There will be no further delay. down the field from Chicago's 32 yard scoring distance. 'layers Have Slickers Ready. line, except for two occasions when In the fourth period Capt. Grange Miss Collet and Mrs. Fraser had pre. the march was changed to a charge. was taken out and substitutes bent pared for the battle today. Both had These two were runs by Stanley in to try tricks or anything else, but heavily spiked shoes, umbrellas, slick- Rouse, whose performance was the the insecure footing made consistent ers, gloves and heavy towels ready. most brilliant of the day from a ground gains impossible. Efforts to carry the Each was prepared to brave the storm. gaining viewpoint. ball forward by passes or plunges The announcement of the Postpone- His first quickstep was for 23 yards usually failed. and both teams punted ment cave them no cheer. On a clever butback to Kentucky's 44 frequently. . . Rhodes Scores Touchdown. An exchange of punts finally left the oval on Illinois' 40 yard line. Choppy Rhodes of Nebraska broke loose off 1 the Orange and Blue left tackle and ran to the locals three yard line, where he was forced out of bounds. On the !next play Rhodes carried the ball ta I the one foot line and on the next placed the ball on the goal line for Nebraska's second touchdown. He kicked the goal. making the final score 14 to O. Coaches of both elevens sent in num berm of substitutes after this score', as both knew the game was over. The new players performed creditably, and each eleven appeared well fortified with reserves. As the game was played there was little to choose between the teams.- At times both gained by use of straight formations, but Illinois was superior with the forward pass- The punting was excellent, considering the condi' tions, while defensive work of both elevens was about a standoff. Mini Mix tp Signals. Illinois fumbled badlyin fact. sev eral of its bright opportunitieti to acb, vance deep into Nebraska territory' were ruined by fumbling. Then there were some bad nitxups on signals. At one time the ball was passed backward and there was no Illinois man to receive it. Fortunately. Grange haps pened to be around to drop on the oval. Nebraska played a strong defensive game and stopped most of Granges at. tempts to cut back off the tackles or to circle the ends. Harold tried, but the Cornhuskers had a defense which stopped the Illinois ace. It was Ali first game Illinois has lost in the new stadium. though Grange tried his best. their attacks both teams used a shifted back field formation. At tiraes the ball a4 pa SS'1 to the near back, while at others the full back received the ball on direct passes. This was especially true of Grange, but the Illinois captain missed the great blocking of Mcliwain and Britton a year ago. The path was not cleared for hini. and he was nailed before he could get under war. Other Illinois backs took thst J. Wetr. 1 Shaner, Dover.it. nrown, Stephen A) Rhodes. twhinch.L. Stephend. Pretmnall It andery. Louke..F. E. IL ii. n. II .. ,. , . , lofty in 91 !Lewis Stars as . THEY HELPED HUMBLE THE ILLINI 11 We gm III . , Arurple Beats ..i . .. : ,, ,: .::,:,. ,..... ,..,,., , .- .:.: ..:....-:,-.-..- .- , ---- --- -- s . . .... ... ... . Coyotes, 1 4-7 !:-:' .-----,-,,,,,-,:ylci-:,:: , - : -,, - -:-,:,- , : : ::,:.,:-,,,,, ,:,,,,,:: ,:,,:.., ,,,,:, .. . . , . . .... " .. . . . , . . . . . . 041 :'? - ,, s: '' 4,;:'-.;.- - 1..1 ,- ,401"' - - , .1 , .. aak-, ?.,,, 4.- :: Itteir II), I ti 9 2. 1 r ,. . :.. .: . ....... ............... ........... ,,.. ,,, . ..,.,,,,:,:.: ,., ,,c,.,....,.., .:.:;:,...- ::;"..,,,,,...,...,..,,,,,,::::: ,:.: ::.:...:..,::,:...,:.;.::,.:.,,:.,:.:,,-,.,.,:.:,:,; . . ......... 1:1) X li- i y . WITH BAKER OUT ,....... ,,,,, -,,::- ,-,.,:,,,,,,:. :::.,,:-,L,:,;-,1::::.,,,:,.,,,,it::::".j.,,:?:,.,..:.::::,:...:i;.:,:,..,:..,,,,..........,,,: -,,.,,.0..,...,,,,:,;,,,,,,,,,,:a..,,i.),;.;.,,,,i,- ,..:.,, - ic.0, ,,-:".: ::,,,, ,,,.,., ,:,,,,, - , i si: .:::.... Nif.04,z,,,, - ' ' - :. . : . . : - - :' :: -- .: ; :::' : ., . . , . - 4.,:::-- -,!:-:::- '. t ,:. y: : --.:' - e''' : ::,$,f ;::1 ,..,,-::-.'i?-,ii.:!:::,'-'.,:4,-,5,0.1n0 , : :. : :. , : , .:: .:: .,:::: - ::::,,.-4,- -,',:: -:::,;,:: -,,s ., ,:,-.. : ,:-,:: ): - -. - 4, :4- 4--- S. . .. , , .NORTIINVEST. 141. 1 co . DAKOTA 171- ':',;,',',.5 ',;:.E. ,.,.:::. ' - '';';:'1,-,N ""-': ;;-.: ; .::: -::::",t ';';.;,:- -4 : , !;:., ,;.:::;,.::,..:." ,',;:"...:i,",,-; ,:',.:V,?,k.'::-:". -- '. c,,' ' , . .. ; ,,,, '.., :.-',: ''' , ko, : : R. E Fivher.!Zellopher. e, ,,,,A.: :: ;, :::, : ,' - - . , e -5-4 , .?::, :if,' "t, :.:):9''R ;,--,,; .;- ,,:.:. : -, :,: - , -: ::: ::..,::,::-:,:-1. .:i! ',: - -,:!,,:: ,!:,!!:: :- ,, ::!,:.if,:.i, ...'.,:. ! .: !: , , .:. . . :...0., ,: . N,, .: chri,manl ',loot. yt, 111. ::,., , .: :::,,::,- - , - t,: 7,.' ' ' Y ' - .t.. ',.: ., r r 2 . . : r:-,,,-: -:, "" ,': ' !-!:,', ..,:::i,! - : -. '-:;,.:,f,,,k; :,:,K- ,iA IR. T . Johnson 'Nichols Star Qualifiiesi :homer' R. G.... Rahr. cohen Diehl ''',. , "' :14. - - -. - L. G. :,::',;.:!.'',,:i':: ! -;.:' :-, , :. '44 ''.., t , ,';'-4,1-r,,,,-.;,2,-e .,,., ,: ,',.,t, kg'sFC'. -, , ,. -,..'",,'t!'!;.' '' .'.4i,:,i'; 4,'.:,.:,4,""-:::';,,:,,. :?,:";i,,,:- ., .., ! ;,' - , ,::::;::..,,: g, r?!: ,b,, 4- .....4:4, ,c Lowry (C. Mrtorye (C. C ' . : ' . ' -'',' '''''.!.''' '...!I 7' ' '4,'' ' - .. 1(44 tii;e. . ''.:,.1:.. :. ' :' '':',:::..':i -'i,.,:.:. ,..;'-:el.,;,,;: ,.:::(.r.5,,,,,,. , : ::,. :::. .:. . . . :. .. !,: , r -. tri.'f, ., 4 ,..i,. ! i. G.. Ross. A .Se hu ler ! M arum'. "4 anners.R.G. r;',,;,;-;:.;, : ;. -, : ,":",1,40;-;,'-14 ..... 4 t".- ,2.;if,",, ,W: , !li r. sfj;.:,,' iioiotteetos"' ..,:, .: :,,,,: :,,,:,, :,,:,,,,,:.::,,,,,,,:;:,,::,,r.,4 -,4,,,v,-,,,i:;,.-,,,o,4 R.-,,:-:-,c,?::,:,i;-.:,,t . :.::,;,,,...; I: tp--ida,, :, ,:, 4,, 4, . . )r City Series. . I, T., S t then m an 'M310ne R. Schuler 1 1 h't..-- - , - 'A.,::- 't s - , ''''''k , .,-0', - -- - "c!,, - . :.';'1;,;.-;::::,':':'-': .,":':.:.. rY::,', :-,,..,0 . -:?.:.::;:':.; .? .;.:4;;,4::,; ; :':- : se, ,I ;,, ,:; 'I .. :, .. , , ,! : - 1 t '''''' :....':': " :-: ' ..44'',15,...,;' 4,-'!,1, i;'Nit'3 So, :'' . .. :,:. 4 : .., k ..,',:,,:"-: . ..,,,,;,. : ,:r:!, ::. ,-,- '7,40;',:::'':ii',.(::-;',..'-':,':':::;";11:?7..'"..,'., 'r.::': -V ;:',:-:'- .: 3"21;:: I, .:::-:::.-:::.:- -;;::: : :..::...-::: :. :'-':',..,::. ::: ,i;:r.--- -.5.- -- . ..5,-.-- - - --r :0 .0---Y.---.., :- - - ,:,s-s, '5- , -,-:,:: 5 ,,,.1---, .:.:::::-:-.:, ,-;" :- .-, :. ,:,-:::::::4 ,,- -:-4::.-- ,-:::,55.- ,i,: x:.,,,-.,:3,-,1 ,,,,:::.,. i..:Az5.:.i,-:!::;i:---,:, :::::., 7: :... ,:i': , -:.;.::: i:.:3 - , .,..,:,,.: :i:::-i , ,.',,"-.,-',;.,,,:-..; . :::-.f : i,,-. ,: ,,::' :,- :i .. ,:,.s.,. ::, .. E. sridel. ,IK athews' Harney, Redeld . R. K 1 : toiiii ."-,-. :i.-. ?,''', ;, - i44.-,::':i''' !;,w-',"'::':W!'"'t, It :":,;:','''-:.0,,,..." ''":";;;-:,:t::,-.'""'- ' -: : :-::: :""' ------' I Dub's. Ryan ....g. R - 4, 4-..4 :'-:41--. - - ,a007,...' ?..:.,41 ,,5-4 -,,.:...',',,:,-,-2 f--5,--1::4:,,::,:,:''i':': 43':-4i'. -:.::;::;: .:: ;;: -::---, :- ::';':-:::'''''''':::-::":' ' ', ' ':' -- --',- -::' -.::: :- ------ -- :-:: ' -.., .::::-,-;,, s,--.-i- :,:: :::. .,:.:::; ,:: ,::f::5.::: . , , pita- -:f. I ..,-:::ir-',.!'''':':::,.:,:!,?'.!-. 5:.: 1 Q. B... Solhei m. Rupeh Vunston. ..sib''W 4:4:.; 1.'':.. ,afl.r7. A:1"V.''''': AS ,: .,s:5,',;.t,s',.' ''..e-f'':.,-.,""':,!, :'...,i:'';::':: ;:, ::.. ,$;;;,.!, :Z,; ,',::,:;'::'-' :::.,,' ,(.' ,,,:,, ",-;;;.!:',,, : -!:-: --;::. , s . -,,, : - ,-',..--,-, ,::: , mi c ' :,!-t,,,,, ?:. ;:' :" :,-', -,.: ::::;) R. H..... White. Fox I Sturgeon I H. 7,-;.--.:7N....,,o;:t5ss1T. ... ' 74',:-'.:4..: ., ,i.. ,::,-,,i,,. i !Clancy- R R. g,t,:.,.- , -:;., ;:, ,:,::::,,:, " :,,,;::.'" ''''' '''1 -;;;,,:",,: ; ".;:;!;-.;:;;;;i-:::::''l ,-";,,t" ! ":":: 'X ;;V!:--"-: ::.'''""; ',"- , .. , , t4;,;;,,,-,-:,,;:,,,-.:.:$,,-,...;,..,.,::,,?,:-...,:, :,,,$,,,,,,--., ,,i;;::;:":.'..:ii-:,i.:,:,,,,- :;,,,,,:,- ':-:!: :: 7 :::, t : ' . -. 1 : ,..; . :-: :; ::: :: ..::.Y.'l::.:.;;;, ',4 NO 21 FOR.TED . I L. 1.1 . . Griffith.! fe..........,.t..4,,,,,...:,,- -- : : ::,,,,.T,,,t ,; -''',-,' -t. , :,,,,,,;,...,-.4 :::,i,". ..,,,4;::' :,.,,:. .3 -'''e 1 .1: i ,,,,;s:,!,,,,:::--:t;:;.;,:;;;:,,,;, ,'''r''fj-0..::'.i:,;:,::. ',;::1 .' ..:,...,: ;,; 4: : l(lf"...;'$'3 ''''"-. '''''',:::'"' .: '..' , ''''. Christman. Bov lk i Din luta ....... ..... P. B. .Ct.k,tiA-ti..,i-' -- !.":;-!' ;!:; :7".7...- ''''''''' 4 ..-' t: k'..::,..' :il,!..:-., :::-::'.., .11, . f.: :, ::. : .,.c,,,,i,:-.::-.!r: ::',4',..;:''' '::.:,...', 1 . , .. - ,..':, q...: ' 4::,,, P.''4: ' - ' 10. II- Lewis. Froelich I rw 4:,;,-,--,-:z..f.,s : 4 ::,:,:,-,-Y,i,ix,:?,,,?,,,x.,,,;...?-, ,,,:,,,,,,,,,,:i.:,::,,.:,,,,?,,.,-,:.::,--::,, t ,..., :,.,,-.: ::,::,,:,,:,:sr. .:,,,::,,,,,,,::;,..ii,.,i,..:',.., i, .,. ' -.''''':x-c-:i t,':,,:,.:,-,,:::::::: ::-,:::,,::.4-,-,: , - : :;:,:. . 1,,,-:,::,,i,,,,,,.:' ,, ,..,-,,,,,::,::,,,,., .,-,..;,,:,,,,,,,,,,.,, -,:::,::,,,!, r::,:,,,,:-,:?,:i,4:.,,.:.,.::--:.::-,?,:::,,i 7 ., a. , ,, .,.;,,:,:,,,:,:,,,:...: .., -..,,,.. ,:. CLEVELA ND. 'Touchdowns Wh ite. Christman. Harney. ",,,..':,:: .',:: '4 : ,;!,eot7":, . ,:. -, -: :-: :. i::,"- ',,;"..: :,,,,,,," ks -as 4 ?,,,,sii:;,,r; -49,-; :- ,,,:i.,,---,:4, ,,,,!; ,, ',.4 .,s,.,!,.. ,:,,, -,. Pi.,.,-,, , ,,,.?!,-,'",,-'''.,::?;,;:: ;:,,t' c", ,-;it:;;.,:',1 l ;: ' -i d,,0; :"--''',,"('-i''' ''-:, ": I Goals from touchdownLewis, 2 : Nichols. I i'.4:::::, 4:-::-it ',.:":";4: 4,Ni ;:,;::',.; :;;i:,,;;;. '' '''''' 4 . 0-Ige, '''' ' :r,--,,;:,-izs,!,::;,1::',"e,:' --t- :t-n': ' - :' ::., .'!';,4 .4,,N!:4;''''''.:4 i''''.7'll .. '''',: ;04;:i:5t -,1,;"'' :' ;:: - , s ,, :; : .s-:;,- - '';,. : 5',4, - Á 7,3,4,,,ie'' ., ' 1 -,':- ,:,,, :, - : ' AB R EH TH PBS H S B P A E ! Re f ereeE ldritlge 1 14 'chi gan I. Um rare 1 ,u!:!,: ..; !,,,::;;;:" . : ...,,,,,;," 1,,,.;,,,;.,;; '?';,;.,'', . " .,,-.:::.,:,. 4,:?;,,,,4.';:,:,:',:',,,,,,4,.,:, 14: ,; ;rr .,. -..,..,,,;:7..0,".!::r4,.. :, !i!,!,..!, '1''..1. , ,, ?.,,-. "J.'',C: tOtt4,',4,";.-'413:.1.i.;.,; - ,:l',,' .11-:,'Vi',::' 1,,,,,';,' 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 ; Li ps k i L Chicago I . Field judro:-lf cCord 111.11-: l';',:.'0,i':",;;;;;4.1'.,;:::'.:';',-,;.;"' . . :,;:;,:,,, : ::::: ; 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 I nots1- Head lineentanM orton Illinois 1- :','si ;',-,;t-:- .' ''' t:: ;,,... 1::,.,...,,.., 1,-,,,,44.::'r,., . ,Isz.,,;:,,,,,:::::.,,:0.:.,,.,:,,,,,.,.,::,.:-,: ,..,.,,,,,..,...,,,,,,..,f,-,.,1..:,,,,,-::,5,.,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,: ,,k,;"4 t' .;',J:;: .,:. . -I. : ;:: ..: ,' 7 ''' , . . ';''').':', ',. ,:4 . - ,,. . :.:t, le., t !,,,i,,; , . : : , , - ,,. ..1$:., . 1"" . :i4 , 44, ''' ..::::,:,?.:,:',. :,,f, t.,:,-'4.::' .r...,,,;:i Oi..9.,':,.".,.,,,,k,Ve.. 4,1;4., sT;r:,,,,!t , -.,,,II.4,:., . , , 4 -trs,:ot :1,,,,. ; . ' :4,- .i; .1', :,:te' : !, , tf....4 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 r-e. ,:',:.; '--7( .": : ' .4,, -,.re,,A!r- '-'";s:',y:!s,..!",ifsek,'r'..7,,,,'$ :i, , -,,,',,,,:,:-,::?'",',::,,.,.t.,.,:: ;f,1:;V:.,,,-4,,,,,,44,"",,. -"...-,,,4,...,....-:,-:"..7-:', '''''' .,-,7;;'''2 --""? ,-,,404,'-'-4R ", ::k ,-- '. kek'!,e4, ' 4 ,' -7 ..:4 :' .'.. . .s." .. K: - . adt.... 3011100'2, 2 o BY IRVING VAUGHAN. 4722-41,.. , . 3., . , ,,., ,,, . ,.. ,,, . .,.. ..9 , , z , . .4 '110: .'! ' ' V,, -.':',. 5,,..,,',A Ar ..;,, - :- , V'. ',At, . , '0,0;" :' ':- l''',. :4 ,., . ., , ..,,,,, 4 A ,..!':', ',': , : , ; . I" ,:; i,.::!. - .,-, ,,,,,- - . . --. ,,,.,1 ' '..- 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 11 00 ''sk;',-"4'-'4 s. As!,;'4:;;; -4 ,,, ,:;: . , b k."'e" 'V..;'.. ''''kk - , i' ti.,,. I ,., . 1:, tb..., '2 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 7 0 A little thing like lack of experience , .,21,.;, , A:.110 .:::-::.: ',Or? ',!5N.ittk''(:lr'et,a''., '.--;'-'''.-...e,4'414, 4, ji,38, 'Al i'":,oz.. ''',';:tr..'s';'''''''.::44'.24;;--,t1'.',?..'--;.414,,A!.;,-).:,,,,4C;4c.f,,-,'' '':,::'C,..:,- ,,t,,1.1;:r I:,;;,,,'"t,-7-..!ti.'..';-..;:,;;,;"'fcl:r4.1 ' - 'i:'"1''''t( ,,::.:!.4,1r,,,,,z- 14 ,.1,-.,a, ,.4,,,,p,4,, ,..4! ,I--:.. , ..:-,..:., :4- ,..-1,F,,,i. f.,4, 0 ,,,,-A,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,, 40,-1,-,-.,;-...;:.4.,,, :::: :, - 3b .3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 .... 0 ' N-;,;;'rlik.,s-te:-'-'.-44." ,,',1' ', :,' i -,, -,',,,,,, ik - -4, :'!",-",-0:?; -e, 1'' : :: -,' ,i;'":70.: .,.---''---:.:,-.',, srtr t.,';'',. . :4'14,0-g,,,,,1 .,:1- ..4 .4..',S',. Y ..... 4 0 2 4 0 0 0 2 1 0, couldn't stop the Purple yesterday.1 F:sr..4:iTt. z4,,,,,,.:,.,;4,4(?1 ,, ,, .4k... :-,,,,,q..".444.; .4-,..,4.,,1.;,,,1,14,i,.,.....44,1040..,ts, ';'' ;";.' N-..ty'r4M. dr- ' tiV O'''4ct"" ;.-'''.A:":;s4;,:. :' -',Z1tKi-i;-;:44 ,;4"..f. .:.:Z-k;,.'i.So' k ,..,y,,,':, lik,k.i, .:.'4.(s,.';tir-k.$,,;,,:, - n 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0' ,,.',:: J:;51,,,,t,:ie.4-:. ;,,,,,, -1,, Ilt, i.-;;,,,-,), -4,,-,5:7-. ,,,-. ,; 4,, ,...,,,0..0....z,--4.,,,:.:,..,.....,.,.. ,..., .., k-: r. A,,: ::,, . ,e- , ,,i,',...; 0 ,,,, v,!!),q,., . ,,,,,r :,..,:;4311 :,ke, ,,;,,, were without the finish of a i t,!!..12'..i:,:!!?;a.'-'-',,,4 ' 1'.!''',a;;,:!!':-.,?p.: z.&1') '-, ,,4.1-1$,..,04411!4,W1:;,;N,aa..,,., "'',,t7,1 r,',.;:A3,,,,i,,"'a.::,,:::;..,t4:,:M::,.r-,.-4,,, ,,,: 0,,,,s,,,::-.,,,,,',,,,,I, ,. -:4,,,,,,,,,,,,71-,,,,.,,,,,,r,,,,r,,,i,,-7-i-,,,,,,,,,,,, , , . 00.i.-x?,,,,,,f...:(4,..' .. ?W, V '-' ';',.,e''',:- ' .,,,,Ilid 0 : '',if '''' 1 ,gpoot,,...4,,O,I, o 14,4,,, 1.1e-,:. 1000000 ilO'Thy ! (C4ke 1 k, ;' -.J;4-,,,,,,,ilf, J ir ,. :::., ' : .:,',,,, . - 'P t,:$1',' f,k,.-: ' ' ' ': '''-' , , ' : : .: . . ''' ' ;i.,t,,,,VIZik,',8k4,:ii'lititittt30"J':,11. ' ! seasoned machine, but they had power ,,,,,s,A:aqe.,,i,i.,.!'..,,.., ;;:f!q :4'i:-;,..'f-':4444,.- ' -?4; ' ,:','N,;,k4'ef'?I'':',.' !t.'rb..., , ',44't',0; 30 2, 7 9 3 1 0 '24 13 0 ! l' land determination. and that was !(1,0?''''?,...,71t:,,3,iz;k- 's.4 s.':',s!''--,!4:-.. :::a4',Akk,.--&4 ,i.,y,4, ,,,e4y,tei.14;, . e.',,,,,,;,i!,,b "'-,;,,',, , A: ' kl l'''''' ,,..;. 114,':, -f'.frt"?,,,,i4p1. ,,$,,,;,,3-;;,:'';4, -,...,''. The relentless smashing of . CH ICA GO . I enevugh. II 04''';'...:-ia,ia ' 7-A'V'-'--artaatIJIr-::t!----,:',-ai: 410';,,.itv;:a2. ,-,,,W.s$8,i',--0,:,,,,,;',.,N.'1, kt.:,- '. '-, de-:' s,,itiL44.,Afaa,?,,s . ,-,.-;ft ',..1A,t.,i4;:,'W,v4k!14,j4,,,7$,Fe. ,1::,-,... ,f,,;t !!!4,p; liluch of the power and deterrnina ,,...k.11.4t.?;:.44,.,.--!?.,,,.,-.:$1,:::-,:. ,!.;,!!.A.;4::.,4sfe.-,his-- ,::-.4 -i!.40;,,,r,:o --!;.,a A0111111T-0013SHSLP A 1-11 rf ' 4 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 tion was concentrated in the 200 pound its:,:r4i'Z741,4.,4,A,,I.,,$,.,!:4!,A.-:::,r'?.,,,:.;,,,7,:,:,,-v', 1 :,:,,:4i!,,I;;-.,-,,t, ,,,,-..,e , li,, ...,,,,..,,I..flytes14,1410,,,,, l 36 d run to the his sensational yard r Rhiondinesi,4Nyeabrrdasliknae hbair of ubgahetk; I 1125000100 -, .! -.7,,,,,t,,,ii:..1..,.:,. -....i...:5,.., .-;,..4.(0,4,4.1ilt,,,,.,.,,,....v.,,,,,.:;0,-,3 4-,, ..nkt;,,-,,w ,.,:,,e.72.i ' 4,., -, , ball glory yesterday. iamn di nfinally t o the r ... 41 0 0 0 0 '0 0 1 0 0 hulk of one Leland Lewis, and mainly ,t2t,.- ,...!6yat,:..,:v.,..2:;40,,:f.i..,,,,:4..,,,Z.,Kte,,,,,,14,1:,t !.fr,e,4.!;(r,:,1,t,-;eli limelight of the seasons foot . ;i; . 4' 0 1 1 0 o 0 F, 5 0 h K;',',!,,,.!-,,,,7,!Ift..s.,,,,. ,?,,,,,...,:t .,,..,I.,.s,e1Z. ,74.q.,VCs4Pt:112:1";?,.49',,:t.S.' lb ; through is effort the Purple was l 3 1 1 2 1 0 0 12 1 0 -. - I.) 0 1 0 0 able to inaugurate its grid campaign i,;;N!,!(;;;,.;g:',3.4.:::;!A-.::.;a,,.::&e.i...IZI;("i'tki,ISI.::,,,A4,4V?',,:lyiT,40,,,;.474.: f!;444,1 41110 I 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 on N hwestern field i -", .,7".: P: .7,::$;:t: '" x.:4't,4"A' -st 3 1 " 4 1 0 0 1 3 0 with a 14 to 7 triumph over the South -110A-::,,,,,,,.,..,,.k.!...,,,,le,f,,,,,,,A,!ti!,,i-,v,, 21.0,Z1'.,,...w.v.,,,,,,,A, ,,,,, , ' "' 0 0 2 0 0 2 2 0 .1-s.. 000 1. '':54:44'?:!: VA ',:, -ic."--;77 '''','' 'fi,'''. -, 04 044-1147..,It,':,.. "'-V.-1'Z't7774..;2;:4 COLLEGE FOOTBAL, I RainP ostpo. nes ,. 0 0 0 0 0 8 .-.... . ...' ''' 0 1 0 0 C' . " 0 ort. ,,,,..Kota Coyotes, before about 18, ts,,,..,:,...,., k4a,, s...,,,;.,,t4.,t4, .r.,.1,,:,;,i,41,,,,, , , , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,44:.. ., .. s.,,,, ,,,(.,,,,5, 4.., , 46,.. .4,,,0,4.'..,.,--,,,3 -v's-.4,14,4,0.::,-,, .; .0 ., ,,,Ae--..nz - ,.: , - I r4-9-;77-1.;41;.fr'w, ..t..0..n4!.t7f7:1.:e.,kV4fr-'4-We., .. AN-'Zn '- il...'. .- .4'41 RESULTS , i000loi:,0, ., Close as it was, however, the scora , ;!.,,,..,s-',z:,,,.1.'4,!''''..,!,e91:kag,..- Iiif,4,, :..,4' 4 ,,,;;,,.r:;!,,,I,,,,,i4.-,....,;. ,,, ..,-,.,-;,..-,..: 4...,,:c,,,,3v.:!- ar,,,i t tell the story. The Purple )14. .,,, a t,e41014'zV',::: ,,ii;4..,r ' 4, .. fe, 7! . 3 te.,,A, , LZ5, ,7..!..t,S,'''.: W ': ?5 .,, ;cA, 7- ---;.t , '-,-'.Vs1r); ,:i4 I W1 9 10 17 6 1 1 27 13 0 dOet4Il-- I k;14-Fp -N., .,, .,.. ,. :; .0.,, ,,.',5,74,..4::44 , 75,io, '1 - . .11';:6S J.:4 J.A:47,'',3 !... t . "Nt,' :.X :;"''', : :,, :,:kt,,,, , Women's Golf, ' never were in danger and the Coyotes , ,-,,,1.,';,, .,!A-,,,..-.,-,;::,!,'.:kia al-!":-..--..'!:,..p.A ''..,.1,,;4';4';"....,,a2;',1-- ,.t,10,:-,4,,;,,,. ,--,. :.,- ,,,,, Ir.AsT . I 000 (ro 0002 ..,,,k4t., -1,4.-01).Ati, ;:,,,,.,,,,:.44?"-,:":;,;4.:7",!!!t,:", :;y:t-sei4r, '4:!r.v ::.:".,: '''' 4',-t0,--If'.1,!--:.,,:,;;.: ::.:,!, " 100 042 O. 9 paraded in earnest only once. That ' ''':'..': ; ..-''E;.ki!lft,elt.t:''''...''''' l'' -.' ''' .'-' t,"1,;;Ivi,:::,tilit tt-,,aLxi,:.:',i:r.f::,;,;,..'4,1.;L':;... Yale, 53; 31Ilddlebur7. O. 1 st,,,.1 la A nsam A t Sheely CrooFe. Three base was when they scored their touch-1 - "le hi ,.... . TT a T.4 "IAA AAA... AI --- -.. - - A 1.- - A - - A A A A A o 11111EMaSirIA -PS1L-Js. u-111-Arinen, u 11-EILEWrn JUJt , , :got 11) WORLD'S GREATEST -d A4..1 tandingl Tlyir tat t 0

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 18,400+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the Chicago Tribune
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free