Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on January 31, 1926 · 29
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 29

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Sunday, January 31, 1926
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1 1.0 PART TWO SPORTS MARK ITS n ti SUZANNE MEET ELEN TRU 110'11E11S EMI DAN OF BASEBALL itiNGS Vote 100 Changes in Playing Code. New Tork, Jan. 30.(113---Rev1sion anti clarification of the playing rules, bath:nag extension of home run park limits and a more liberal application of the sacrifice fly rule, today required approval of almost 100 changes by the johlt r21es committee of the major and minor baseball leagues at the closing meeting of a two day session. Most of the amendments necessitated (only slight modification to meet possible contingencies. the outstanding change making facrifi ce filesieffectivo te all cases where runners are advanced a base. Hitherto a sacrifice has been allowed on a fly ball hit when &runner scored after the catch. Lift Ban on Rosin. Revision of the pitching regulations to permit the use of rosin, approved by the committee yesterday, was written into the rules today; requiring that under the supervision and control of the umpire. the pitcher may use. to dry bis hands, a small, finely meshed bag containing powdered rosin, furnished by the league." No application of the main to the ball will be permitted, the committee announced. Balls hit into grand stands, to count es home runs in the future, must travel 250 feet, an increase of 15 feet over the former limit. Major league parks, however, will not be affected by the change. Coaching boxes at firirt and third base were reduced to 15 foot rectangles, the rest spell between double headers was increased from 10 to 15 minutes, while winning home runs in the last half of the ninth, to be scored ts for base hits, will hereafter require the batsman to complete the circuit. ltwas explained by the committee that in some games last year, where mere Citgles were required to win, batters who had driven the ball into the stands touched only first base and then ran tit the clubhouse. Go After Intentional Pass. The committee hit at violation of the intentional pass rule from an unusual angle, taking steps to prevent the issuing of bases on balls through throwing the ball to a baseman, rather than to the catcher. The amended rule now reads that 'with the batsman in his proper position the ball shall not be thrown by the pitcher to any player other than the catcher, except in an attempt to retire a base runner." If re-Plated after warnings by the umpire, the rule adds. the pitcher shall be removed from the game. Another change provides that no substitutions shall be made while the bail is in play, complaint having been made by a minor league club that a ;layer substituted for a catcher just as the ball was thrown to the plate by the pitcher, made a foul fly catch attar the dugout. Error for Pitcher. Delay of an hour and a half in a rune last year 'resulted in a rule amendment deleting the clause giving the umpire permission to prolong contests after a 30 minute intermission on account of iain. The rule now reads that at the end of a half hour the umpire shall have authority to end the game. Hurlers who make wild pitches on third strikes will no longer be credited with strikeouts. Furthermore, under a change made today, they will be t-edited with errors on such misplays her the batter reaches first base. CULVER CADETS DEFEAT SENN FIVE, 43 To 28 Cwhter. Ind Jan. 30. Special ttito etilver Military academy basketlki.a team downed Senn High of Chiea-g this afternoon. 43 to S. The mdets started (LT with a rush and lexred 21 points during the fIrst guar-Ter, while the Senn lightweights count7. At this stage the Senn heavyghts entered the game and held CulPr to 3 points during the second guar.01". The half ended :4 to 14. I College Scores 1 PM TEN. flitotre. 21; Ohio Stott", MIS-n4)1M1 ALLEY. ittroot 124. Itrto.ko, 2-1. Nebtraela, 39; Grimbell. 16. (rntElt NODE'S. Clbner lows, 16: himpoon. 12. M. lotto's tot. X2; Randolph-Macon, 20. 441,r1r. 21; Culver Stockton. 17. 10106 Morti 26; unhurt. 23, bonSP0110 36; Erna State, . 12. 6-!: Auburn. 31. Nettli Dakota, 21; Nputil Dakota State. 14. Ataaloy. 21,4; A woman. P. Whyatok &I; Levi. it-IA.. 10: Oberlin. 19. Geotela, 33: r.,,eortiu Teel 29. N-etrit Dam.. 3 ; Detroit. 26. Coon. Agelea. 23; Illamstrd. 2 1. , Cornell, 36; Dart mout h, 21. N 17. 11; tleorgetonn. t."11110 23; Army. 20. Lombard. 20; torrolt, 16. 'Llusato Y, 30: Lan., Yorebt, iiitnots toll, 31; P.hartlett. 10. Antivenin& 1.,1.1; torstenart. 14' Ildotrri. l:Li Vi 11.6450SLIbig 1kiS, 17., Hotzber Shut Out in First Dash onBoards (Picture on page 3.) - Boston, Mass. Jan. 30.-441Hubert Houben, sprint champion of Germany, was shut out tonight in his first race in America at the Knights of Columbus games bere tonight He trailed behind Al Miller of Harvard, Frank Hussey of Easton college, and E. P. Morrill, Boston university dark horse, in the 40 yard dash. Tony Plan-sky of Georgetown was shut out In the same event The time was :04 4-5. One world's record vras equaled when J. P. Murphy of Boston college covered the 45 yatd hurdles in Sit seconds, leading Ballantyne of Harvard by several feet Houben Offers No Excuse. Houben took his defeat 011166001- teeny. He smiled and gripped the hands of the other sprinters. His face was Impassive as the result was announced.- " I'll do better on these boards In another week," was the only comment his trainer, Jake Weber, could get from him. Houben speaks no English. Weber said that the German athlete " likes things over here," was encouraged with the attitude of the crowd, and pleased with arrangements made for him. He is clean cut in appearance. rather below medium height, well knit, and wears his dark brown hair close cropped. Houben won his preliminary heat in the forty yard dash easily. His time was two-fifths of a second slower than the world's record of :04 2-5. He flashed ahead at the gun and finished in a trot at the tape. It was his first race on a board track. Leness Beats Helffrich. George Leneas, Massachusetts Tech star. beat Alan Helffrich of the New York A. C. to the tape in the Bishop Cheverus 600 yard run. Helffrich appeared in distress on the last stretch. Haggerty of Harvard was third. The time was 1:17 1-5. Plansky of Georgetown won the K. of C. shot put with a heave of better' than 44 feet. lie was barred from the New England A. A. U. event. 3.1 C. Lawler of the Boston A. A. heaved; the shot 42 feet 10 inches to win- the latter event. George Lermond, National Amateur Athletic union six mile champion, finished in front of a strong field in the two mile run. Peasiee of the University of New Hampshire was second. The time was 9:48. Holy Cross Runs Over Harvard. Holy Cross great team romped away from Harvard in the 1,560 yard relay. The Purple shot out in front at thestart and finished fifteen yards I in front. The time was 3:05. Willard Tibbett of Harvard, interi collegiate two mile champion, indoors and outdoors, and cross country champion to boot. carried his honors well In winning the K. of C. mile run. He held the lead throughout. and ran away from Leo Larrivee when he tried to catch him on the last lap. The event carried with it the James 3L Curley trophy. " MOLLA MALLORY 2 IIIISS-BROWNE IN a le MEET TOMORROW g ril New York, Jan. 30.-- Speciall-- 11, rs M Mo a Mallory of New York and Il w 1, Miss Mary K. Browne of Santa Montt. I lea, Cal., both former national cham- t ,d , pions. Will play in the annual indoor i I invitational tennis tournament which 1 n will start at Brooklyn Monday morn- I 9d ling. Mrs. Mallory is at the top of the a 9 draw in the second round. while Miss ,e1Browne heads the lower division in the rs first round., Twenty-seven players are entered in the tournament. which, as usual. has 1 drawn many of the leading players of I the east. The entry of the French international team. Jean Borotra, Rene La 40 Coste, and 'Jacques Brugnon, has -, ; aroused tremendous interest in the na tional - indoor tennis championship starting Feb. 15, and has also furnished the incentive for Vincent Richards and William Tilden to engage in the play. Not since 1920 has Tilden competed for the title. DELANEY NAMED AS STARTER FOR ILLINOIS RELAYS Champaign. EL Jan. 30. (P)-00- cials of the University of Illinois announced t od ay that Martin De- r."."H, s ,., Limey of Chicago would be starter ir , for the annual II- ,, , linois indoor relay ,4,,,,4 f.7.,,,i:. arnival to be held fr,,, - . - , I I here Feb. 27 and N ,e,, $ - ) that Avery 13rund- -,:07:75,6 ,,t ... age. also of Chi-. ,,,,,, mgo, would act as N ' ..."- ,' referee. Entries have j A ,,- beert mailed to r ,-' t , T several hundred - Ix, ;I schools and uni 1 oe versitieg. I iWileNtilri . The actual run- MARTIN DELANEY. fling time of iTittlit.NE Fboto-I evepts in the evening will be confined to two hours, according to Coach Harry Gill, who plans to bold the prelimtnarit.a in the afternoon. ftD MISS WILLS IS POOR FORM BUT VIINS 3 MATCHES Worried by Criticism of Her W6ting. ' BY DOM SKENE. tChicage Tribune Press Service" tCopyright: 1926: By The Chicago Tribune.1 CANNES, France, Jan. 30.--nelen Wills and Suzanne Lenglen will clash In the battle of the centtrry for feminine athletes during the Carton Club tennis tournament at. Cannes in the week of Feb. 11, unless an unexpected upset of today's dope intervenes. Neither champion has yet sent in a formal entry, but both express a desire to play in the singles there. The last hope of the great pair meeting in the Nice tournament. starting Monday, went glimmering today after a series of off again on again incidents surpassing the well known Finnegan. Previously it was expected that both would play at Nice. Miss Wills Intended to play in the singles straight through the Riviera season, and Mlle. Lenglen seemed certain to play on her home club courts. according to the annual custom. Then Miss Wills withdrew from the Nice meet because she did not want to play with the slow . low bouncing grooved balls used there. Mlle. Len-glen cut her eye teeth with these balls . but they are new to Miss Wills. who was trained with the fast American balls. Criticism Arouses Suzanne. Mlle. Lenglen waited until the latest polbie moment last night. and then decided definitely to play in the Nice singles. This morning a storm of criticism was aroused by Mlle. Len-glen's decision. Unkind critics declared Mlle. Lens len held up sending in her entry until she was certain Miss WMs would not play. When Suzanne heard the anvil chorus today she changed her mind and again scratched from the Nice singles. Both champions entered the mixed womens' doubles, so they may face each other across the tennis net as a preliminary to the skirmish hoped for In the singles duel now looming for Cannes. Mlle. Leng len is partnered wttt Baron de Morpurgo. ranking No. 2 Italian star, in the mixed doubles at Nice. and she is paired with Mrs Phi Ms Satterthwaite, English star. It the women's doubles. Miss Wilts win play wtth Charles. Aeschliman. giant Swiss star and husband of Leslie Bancroft. former American star. In the women's doubles Helen Is paired with Miss Eileen Bennet, young English star. British Girl Gives Helen Battle. Miss Wins almost gave her admirers heart failure this morning. Playing a wobbly, erratic game. the American champion had a tough struggle before she beat Mrs. It E. Ilaylock an obscure English player. 9-4. 6---2, In the Gallia tournament singles. Only the superior physique and stamina of 1 the Californian pulled her through against the inspired play of the blonde English girl. who attacked continually,: keeping Helen on the defensive. Mrs. Haylock was within two points of winning the first set. 7-5. when Miss Wills rallied desperately. tied the seore and drove on to win. In the second set, after leading one love. Mrs. Haylock weakened and the American took the set, which was more closely fought than the score indicates. Mre. Haylock is rated in England as a good player in small county tournaments, but she has not played at Wimbledon. and experts agree that she will be lucky to score more than a single game against Mlle. Lenglen. Wins Two Doubles Matches. Miss Wills made no excuses for her unimpressive showing this morning. but she was obviously much disturbed lust before going on the court when she was shown French papers criticizing her writing on tennis subjects and copies of telegrams from President J. W. Mersereau of the U. S. L. T. A. commenting On the criticism. Miss Wills waltzed through two mixed doubles victories into the semifinals of the Gallia tournament at Cannes this afternoon. Partnered with Commander Jack Hilliard, tall English star. Helen showed improved form over her disappointing morning singles play. Miss Wills and Commander Hilliard first beat Miss Evelyn Jones and Felix Poulin. 6-3, and then eliminated young Rosine last. cousin of Didi last, and the Hon. F. O. B. Fisher. snowy haired English veteran. 6----1 The failure of Helen and Suzanne to enter the singles next week has bitterly disappointed a host of tennis lovers along the Riviera. Many want their ticket money refunded because they bought ringside seats at 500 francs ($20) each to see the singles duel between the worlds two best women players. Pessimists already declare that the rivals will continue to stall and will not meet until the St Cloud championship at Wimbledon. Miss Wills' stock took a downward dive this afternoon following her showing this morning. when the Monte Carlo betting group offered to back IMlle,. 1.englen for any amount at five to one odds. !nem WORLD1$ GREATEST 4QUEENS OF JANUARY 31, 1026. ill TENNIS AWAIT DAY OF BATTLE ' Suzanne Lenglen (left) on the Riviera, talking tennis and possibly the coming match against Helen Wills, with two .of her European rivals, Mrs. Blumenthal and Didi Illasto (right). The latter is the No. 2 ranking player in France, and alter a defeat at the hands of Miss Wills declared Suzanne would defeat the American girl. Bears Romp Over Portland Loggers, 60-3 Portland. Ore., Jan. 211SpeciaL1 Red Grange and the other exponents of higher football talents representing the Chicago Bears, had little difficulty submerging an eleven composed of George Wilson and longshoremen and lumber jack members of the Waterfront A. C., 60 to 3, here this after. A critical turnout of 6.500 saw the Bears loaf at intervals while tolling VP their most one sided score of an arduous schedule. The crowd was well satisfied with the showing of the visitors, especially Grange. ResDest 25 Yards. The Illinois flash played from the opening 'whistle almost to the end of the first half, carrying the ball ten times for gains of 86 yards. He went out after being slightly injured. Four men fell on him in a pileup and Red lay on the ground a couple of minutes. Tonight it was said be was not hurt Red's best feat was a 25 yard run around end in which be started as if on a line buck, loafed to the side of the field. turned hack abruptly and shifted his Gild& Grey hips out of the futile clutches of half a dozen tacklers. Red NV3-I stopped for little or no gain six times. Poor Line Hampers Wilson. tied ecored two touchdowns, one in the first period. on a slant off-tackle and another in the second. after a 15 yard pass from Walquist The latter made the longest run of the day. a 45 yard dash straight through the line. for a touchdown. George Wilson, like Grange. played twenty-five minutes of the first half, but behind the papier mache line of the locals he had nothing like Orange's opportunity to perform. In fact, his team had the ball on only six plays while he was in. Just twice did George get away. once for 28 yards on a fourth down Another run by the Washing. ton demon was good for 22 yards. : TAYLOR GETS WORLD HIGH HURDLES MARK When the I. A. C. Indoor handicap track and field games were held in the Broadway armory Friday night a worlds record went unnoticed by the oMcials. In the 70 yard high hurdles. nve flights. Morgan Taylor of the TriColor club team negotiated the distance in :08 8-5. The former mark was :08 4-5, and was made by Waldo Ames of the C. A. A. a few Years ago. Taylor is now tbe bolder oC the 70 yard high hurdles, 400 meter three foot hurdles, and quarter mile hurdles worlds records. NEWSPAPER SVII-LVED 21 CANNES 1VEXT WEEK I Miss Helen Wills. after smashing her way to victory over all rivals in her play in France, is ready to carry Uncle Sam's colors against the mighty French champion. National Skating Races I I ' c , ", . Postponed; Ice Too Soft; 1,..L..L.,.., ,.., ..' . . ,,:.,....,' ."... Binghamton; N. Y., Jan. 30.L4') 1 Because of soft ice, the opening of the 1 Three of the American girrs victims since she started campaign- national ice skating championship ing in France for the match with Lenglen. Miss Saunder (left). Leslie 1 on meete , scheduled for today. was post- I Eancroft Aeschilman (Lipper right), and Didi Vlarto (lower right). pd until tomorrow. Edgebrookto Get $50,000 Clubhouse BY MORROW KRUM. (Picture ort page 3.) A 350,000 clubhouse and nine addl- Buckeyes Lead Until tional holes will be added to the Edge- brook forest pre- - the enigLast 3 illinutes. serve golf plant this year. accord- ing to an an. nouncement made - - University of Chicago basketban by Commissioner r(.-w , i team. ma Ot the Big Ten con- Dan Ryan of the county board yes- 4.' I ference. defeated Ohio State. one of terday. It was the most formidable of the champion- also announced that additional ar, ship contenders. 21 to 20. at Bartlett , forest preserve --1W-. grin last night. courses will be It was a terrific tilt. with the Buck- constructed in the ,Assa, t eyes holding a slight advantage Comm issioner near future. , through most of the fray. Only three , Ityan's announce-minutes before the end the Maroons ment came after t assumed the lead. a lengthy inter- ArlsON 3. CERMAK. view with Presi- UntiBUICE Photo. Merger Ties Score. dent Anton J. Cermak. The plans for Ohio State was in front. 13 to 14, the clubhouse were decided upon and when suddenly Chuck Itoerger. Maroon advertisements for bids will be pub- -1--A floor guard, broked down to sink a bas- llshed tomorrow. It is planned to start work on the clubhouse before March 1. Build Clubhouse on Knoll. The new clubhouse will occupy a knoll overlooking the first tee of the present Edgebrook course. The building will be of the old Italian type of 1 architecture. It will be 150 feet long and 60 feet wide. There will be 300 lockers for men and 100 for women. The dining room will have a ?mating capacity for 150. Showers. lounging room, caretaker's quarters, a wide veranda, and a dining room that can be turned into a dancing pavilion will be among the accommodations. Coarse Has 27 Holes. The addition of nine holes will give Edgebrook fans -twenty-seven holes of golf. Commissioner Ryan announced the course will ha kept in better condition in the future. The greens and the fairways will be properly sprinkled. These improvements will give to Chicago one of the most beautiful public courses in America. The charms of Edgebrook, its sporty holes and the delightful landscape have earned a place In the hearts of many golfers. 1 Sheldon Clark Heads C. A. A. Sport Board Sheldon Mirk, well known sportsman, yesterday was made chairman of the Chicago AttZetle associap tion athletic com mittee to succeed William IL Pow. t ell, who held the k , 104,1111, chairmanship for L. ' JIT . t 7 five years and ,iibt-, . ., 4 I who was recent- $ ly elected vice . president of the I. Cherry Circle .,it e,,p,1 , club. Clark's ap- V 7- -, .4 pointment w a a t ,,,, .k, imatre by Lucius Kle14 I- t I Teter. the new .1kt ,';i' ! president, who is 1 IL Od also a keen follower of amateur SFITI-DON CLARK. athletics. iTELBCNE Photo.' Although Clark is better known in yachting circles than in other trancbes of sporting activity. he is an enthusiast for any line of amateur endeavor. Be has taken a keen interest in zwimming and follows the results of track and field contests closely. Clark is one of the country's leading yachtsmen. Ills yacht. The Hainbow, has been prominent in Mackinac races and other long contests on Lake Michigan. He is also a power boat fan. Asitde from being chairman of the athletic committee. Mr. Clark is a 1 member of the board of directors of the C. A. A. and has been placed on t several other committees. ' R1TOLA TO GET , CHANCE AT NURIIII RECORD FEB. 11 1 New -fork. Jan. 30.--(Speciall Willie Ritola. sturdy Finnish-American distance runner. Is expected to make Ibis assau:t on Paavo Nurmi's two mile record at the first indoor athletic meet of the Crescent A. C.. to be conducted . in the 13th regiment armory. 13rooklyn. Feb. IL Bitola has entered a special two mile race added to the New Moon clubs program for the express purpose of giving the Finn a chance at the record. One of his foremost rivals will be James Louckes of E3rrncuse university. who was runner up to Vernne Booth in the fall of 1924 for the intercollegiate cross country champlonship. GRIFFS RELEASE FOUR VETERANS Washington. D. C., Jan. 30.--tc)--- Four veteran players were given their unconditional release today hy the Washington Americans. Word from President Griffith at Tampa said that Bob Veach and Harry LiCemo bold. outfielders; Everett Scott, shortstop, who holds the record for continuous games played. and Allen Russell. pitcher. were given their freedom with the privilege of selling their services. All the players are ten year men and every major league club waived on them. ' 0 11-lesPre. !Wham 44. port tam. A aloe. "At at& 4-- o Ppetholl 12 Parte 8 K4414b. tiAt atom. 14 PARTS 7-.-1" oh damm bt rester... to--A at am 1 om-1 arm M ma& 1 ...Marie I y. -1--41 goon len. 1-41 riff i 1 11-14 mat AAA. 11 A LQJ NEER TOSSES THREE GOALS TO CLINCH VICTORY ket from long range. Less than a minute later he tiNI the score with another counter. Ohio State took time out. When play was resumed Ohio State tried frantically to score from long range. but the Maroon defense was too strong. In the scuffle Little Teddy Zimmerman. Chicago forward. was fouled. Zimmerman calmly sank his counter. putting his team one point in the pad. Then came the anti-climax for. after Ohio State had again taken time for discussion, Merger added to his glory by dribbling half the iength of the floor weaving and whirling past the Buckeyes, and heaving the leather high over the heads of his advercaries to score his third basket from the field. Sub Scores for Ohio- Then the Buckeyes, losing a. game they were doped to win. played like mad, taking desperate chances to annex counters. Dempsey went in in the place of Bell- lie took the ball on a.pass and looped his shot, bringing his team within a point of the Maroons just a second before the final gun Mr3-41 fired. , The score Indicates bow' tight a guarding game it VMS- Both teams played brilliantly on the floor. Cunningham. the lank Buckeye star. got the jump at center almost without fail, but his touted shooting ability was of little avail against the vigilant Maroon guards. Hoerger was the outstanding player on the floor, his work under the backboard and his speed in getting the ball down the floor augmenting the valor of his three spectacular baskets at the tend of the game. Capt. Babe Alyea, panning was smooth sa usual. and his I guarding was improved. though his shooting was one of the weaknesses lot the Maroon attack. McDonough and t Sackett did their work effectively, while ;the speedy little Zimmerman made himself a general nuisance to Ohio State championship hopes. Lineup: CHICAGO (211 OHIO STATE Vzol 11 PP Sae-keit:It 0 0 3;1;emn.ey.111-1g 2 2 1 Zimtnermanle " i't"r"-rt I 9 3 Alyea-e I LUflhIIntti&i1 I !!! mo)tmoottor 2 1 5 T.rbrIJ 1 5 o lioerger.re 3 1 2 Seiltert,rg 0 0 :t be11.11 0 I Nison.lt 0 0 0 Referee-11'91,71e Wabash). UmpireYoung Ilannula Wesleyan). I?i0TRE DAME GETS SCARE I South Bend. Ind.. Jan. 30.-1 Speciall Notre Dame..pulled a tight basketball game out of the Ere tonight when in an overtime period the Irish defeated the University of Detrolt,.31 to 26. Harrigan, center, was the backbone of the Detroit live. The team play of Notre Dame was a bit ragged until the overtime period. Mike Nyikos made his debut under Notre Dame colors. Two year ago he led the western conference in scoring while playing for Indiana. Lineup: NOTRE DAME t1L 1 . LIE-rnorr j '241 11 IP P, 11 P P Ley,rt 0 0 0 Pe-her . 2 4 3 m. ,Nrikee.rt 0 0 e-4-1 rf 1 1 4 m('lceny.11 3 3 3' ko.s-,Nr ig o o Crowe It 1 2 0 Harrizak, e 3 0 1 Ny Otos e 2 3 rz 0 3 11aLmso.rg 1 2 2 MeTtlsolc711 3 0 4 Coarei.IS 1 2 3, bovol.4 0 0 0 t De Plinl ) tapireCleary t Notre Liarme 1. NIBS PRICE IS NAMED COACH OF GOLDEN BEARS Berkeley. Cal.. Jan. 30,Eu. p. Clarence Nibs Price, assistant to the late Andy Smith, as University of California football coach. today was picked as Smith's successor by the university athletic muncilchoice of Price must be ratified by the executive committee of the ahsoelated students, but opinion was that the selection would be approved:1:o salary for the position vras red and and the length of contract was not discusse& it was stated- These questions will be decided when the executive committee meets 'Wednesday n!ght Today's Sport Pro grain ICE DERBIES. Northwest Skating club's annual lc skating Derby at Humboldt park. 1 P. IntTRArSHOOTING. 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