Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on April 20, 1934 · 1
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 1

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Friday, April 20, 1934
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NEWS SUMMARY Friday April 20 1934 VOLUME XCIII.-NO. 95 tilltiltING DEFIES JAPANESE; BUYS PLANES 111 U. S. Chinese Enraged by Tokio's Warning. Tokio Explains Stand Chicago Tribune Press Service-1 TOKIO, April 20 FridaY.1 " Japan has no intern ion of interfering with a third power engaging in trade and other transactions with China," a foreign office spokesman said today. " In fact, sve welcome such transactions. Neither do we have any desire to deviate from the established policy of the open door in China nor do we wish to infringe on existing treaties. However, the time has passed when other nations or the league of nations can prosecute their policies for exploitation of China." He explained that last Tuesday's statement. which opposed occidental assistance to China, was not aimed at any particular country end was not made for any particular reason, but to reaffirm the policies set down by Foreign Minister Koki Hirota in his speech before the diet. Hirota spoke as follows at the time "Japan in serving as the cornerstone for the edifice of peace in Asia bears the entire burden of I esponsibilities." BY JOHN POWELL. !Chicago Tribune Press Service., SIIANGHAL April 19.--China intends to disregard the Japanese declaration opposing occidental sales of aircraft to the Nanking government. It was indicated today. Dr. H. Kung, finance minister. signed a contract with Carl Nahmmacher, local representative of the American United Aircraft company, for 20 military planes. The contract calls for immediate shipment. Kung refused to comment on the Japanese 'hands off China" pronouncement, but a finance department spokesman said that China is particularly interested in the reaction of the powers. Ile pointed out that Japan's action is tantamount to closing the open door in China. The government, he added, contends that if the Japanese doctrine is permitted to stand, it will not be long before the Nipponese also will be banning sales of automobiles or even cloth for making soldiers' uniforms and lether for footwear, on the ground that this would be likely to disturb the peace of Asia. Lashes Japan's Alm. ' A spokesman of the Natilsilig foreign office said: "Since international peace is only maintained through the collective et of all nations directed at the removal of fundamental sources of friction. no single state has the right to claim the exclusive responsibility for main ta ining international peace in any designated part of the world. " China has never harbored any intention of injuring any nation or of causing a far eastern disturbance. China's collaboration with other nations. whether through loans or technical assistance, has been strictly limited to matters of a nonpolitical character. The purchase of military equipment such as airplanes and the employment of military instructors is for no other purpose than national defense and to maintain order within t he country" No country which does not harbor ulterior designs against China need entertain fears concerning China's policy of national reconstruction and security. Regarding the , present Sino-Japanese situation, peace between the two countries depends' on good will and mutual understanding. .Hence the unfortunate state of affairs can only be rectified when Sine-Japanese relations are established 'on a new basis of the mutual aspirations of the two countries." Attack Tokio's Statement. - Chinese newspapers and public , organizations meanwhile ' united in an outburst against the Japanese statement of policy which was designated as similar to the 21 demands which Japan presented China in 1915. - The Chunghua Jill Pao declared: "Japan assumes responsibility for maintaining peace in the orient, but we find only evidences of Japan's acts of aggression, the occupation of Manchuria, the invasion of Shanghai, the annexation of Jehol, and the creation of disturbances in North China. Hence China will never tolerate Japanese monopoly." The Chen, Pao, organ of Marshal Chiang Kai-shek, virtual dictator of siCoulloued on page 6. column Li 12LiRU LOCAL. Three slayers die at na w U in electric chair; two write letters in final hours. Page 1. Statistics reveal Chicago's livable climate, showing city outnone in hotter, colder, and windier days by many other municipalities. Page 1. Aid. Oscar Nelson quizzed in racket trial on meeting with Al Capone; he insists meeting with gangster was accidental. Page 2. Alexander Troyanovsky, new soviet ambassador, will pay his first visit to Chicago today. Page 4. Members of independent faction in Zion complain to Lake county prosecutor against Yoliva's tactics. Page 5. United States court halts Secretary Wallace's order cutting live stock rates at the stockyards. Page 7. Bond transfer by park boards approved, paving way for early completion of outer drive bridge. Page 8. Prosecutor Courtney's war on crime praised as he is awarded medal of flag association. Page 9. Three killed when truck and auto collide. Page 9. G. W. Willett of La Grange warns educators against dangers of stressing New Deal teachings in high school economics courses. Page 15. News of society. Page 17. Death notices. obituaries. Page 29. Radio programs. Page 29. DOMESTIC. NVounded Dillinger's visit to his home town is revealed; ,-esperaclo suspected in Pana. Ill.. bank robbery. Page Attacks begin at Springfield against bill backing NRA with state authorit3'. too. Page Ark ansas official decides convict " mules aren't treated so badly; holds job no harder than others. Page Democrats and Republicans open state meetings today at Springfield: Campbell slated as Democratic chair. man. Page 16. FOREIGN., Chinese defy Japan; disregard warning against making military purchases by ordering planes in U. S. Page 1. Madrid terrorized by escaped animal named Coronilla, who dies death ' of a bull. Page 2. , Germany heralds el-a of expansion , into Balkans; weleomes Bulgaria n Page 1 premier. of a bull. Page 2. Germany heralds era of expansion into Balkans; welcomes Bulgaria n premier I age It . Laborite appeals to British govern. ment to pay United States dela with budget surplus. Page 11. Richard Washburn Chill puzzles U. S. circles in France; on trade mission. but passes up American commerce body. Page 29. NVASIIINGTO N. Douse vote on Chicago Fair bill delayed in house by Rept esentative Blanton after he is rebuked by members. Page 3. Bishop Caution. witness at own trial. defends his handling of campaign funds in 1928. , Page 3. New Blue Eagle ready for all members of coded industries. Page 6. Editors, holding convention in capital, chat with Roosevelt on press and New Deal. Page 8. District of Columbia grand jury condemns practice of " selling political influence" in Washington. Page 10. TRIBUNE AVIDER MARKET DRIVE. Denmark wants reciprocal treaty with U. S. to expand trade. rage 33. SPORTS. Cubs beat Reds, 4-1; Sox whip Tigers, 9-8. Page 25. Red Sox beat Senators in double header. Page 25. Londos meets Garibaldi in return bout tonight. Page 25. Root to pitch today in Cubs' game at St. Louis. eage 27. Terry crashes homer; Giants beat Phils, 2 to O. Page 27. Highly rated horses nominated for Illinois Derby. Page 28. EDITORIALS. In Defense of Americanism; Our Fighting Front Against Crime; A Public Debt to Factor; The Illinois NRA. - Page It. FINANCE. COISDIERCE., Armour directors will pass on recap. italization plan today.; Page 31. Reveal 1,000 closed banks have not asked federal aid. - - I'age 31. Prof. Irving Fisher assails New Dealers for " Russian ways." I'age 31. Chicago banks move to cut interest on savings to 2 per cent. Page 31. Wheat slumps; Wallace predicts less spread in world prices.' Page 31. Stock market is upset by wheat break; preferred list higher. Page 32. Distillers' marketing pact near end; parity grain price fails. Page 33. Cattle decline on larger supply; lambs rise. hogs steady. ' Page 34. Want Ad index. Page 34. Average net paid circulation I March 1934 THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE DAILY csns of 775!000 REG. U. S. PAT. OFFICE. COPYRIGHT 1934 BY THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE. I I 1 Thu 1 'iI(LcI vi ili I 11111 '11 11 I II ----- --- ----.---.--..- - - --- - --- - -,- - - t 4- - A DENTIST SHOWS' HIS TEETH TO A PAIR OF BANDITS Dr. Emil Miller, dentist at 32 West Randolph street, yesterday gave a practical demonstration of the value of good. sound teeth. Although he bit off more than he could chew, his powerful molars saved him from robbery. Dr. Miller WAS working on a pa. tient. Crag Simpson, in his office on the twelfth -Boor when two men P ntered. One of them bad. during the morning, made an appointment with Miss Virginia Applequist,- 1944 Wilson avenue, the doctors assistant, for 4:30 p. M. But on arrival he showed plainly he did not intend to have his teeth repaired. lie thrust a pistol at Dr. Aliller and demanded money. The doctor, instead of obeying, grappled with the bandit. in their struggle.he got hold of the man's left fore. finger and bit it so hard the robber howled with pain. Aleanwhile the second robber attacked Simpson and also was resisted. So stern was the battle put tip by the intended victims that both robbers fled as soon as No. 1 had gotten his finger away from the dentist. A pair of spectacles worn by the bitten bandit were left behind. Detectives Roy Kindt and Guy Willoughby last night started a Sea rch for a 111;ln with an injured digit. Laura Ingalls Lands in Porto Rico on Flight Home' SAN .1CAN, Porto Theo,. April 19.-- ; (JP)--Iaura Ingalls landed on American soil ibis evening after a flight through South America. The United - States flyer flew here today from Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. ;- THE WEATHER FRIDAY, APRIL 20. 1034. Sunri.e. 50'1 a. in.; sunset. 6:36 p. m. Moon sets at 1:11 a. m. tomorrow. Venus is a morning star. THE TRIBUNE Chleago and vieinits BAROMETER. Generally lair and -.,- ---, rather mot today; r-cil---S-'N r-- --tr, tomorrow lair and SI- in oer a tely cool. ' A- , - moderate northerli t,p,' winds tomorrow. .7-i.),' '.' ) Illinois Fair and '--4., 2y rather cool today. , , , tomorrow lair and .-- -7 slightly warmer. '-----.t'k'YD"','I-----' ILMPERATURES IN CHICAGO 1 MAXIMUM, NOON 54 . MINDICM. 2 A. Al 40 Diaximum a year ago, 50; minimum, 411 3 a. tn....49 Noon E4 8 P. ni--46 4 a. in. . .47 1 p. m 54 9 p. m....46 5 a. to....46 2 p. Unofficial-- 6 a. m...45 3 p. ni 52 10 p. in....44 7 a. in....47 t P. 50 11 n. m.,..43 8 a. 5 p. m 48 Midnight 42 9 a. In.-51 ti p. m 47 1 a. m....41 10 a. in....52 7 p. m. 46 2 a. m 11 a. in....53 For 21 hours ended 7, p. m. April 19: Mean temperature. 53 degrees; normal. 48 degrees: excess for April. 77 degrees; excess since Jan. 1. 173 degrees. Precipitation, trace; deficiency for April. .38 of an inch; deficiency since Jan. 1. 4.43 inches. - Barometer. 7 a. m.. 29.94: p. m., 30.03 Highest wind velocity, 23 miles- an hour from the northwest at 1:45 p. (Official weather table on page 33.1 FRIDAY. APRIL eZ; No t c City Can Meet: All Corners on Climate Topic How Chicago became known as "the Windy City " was recalled again yesterday Ni hen Frederick Rex. municipal librarian, Issued comparative statistics for 1933 on the climate of 24 cities in the United States having a population of 300,000 or more. The findings again disprove the fallacious assumption that the nickname arose from any meteorological characteristics. They show 13 cities windier than Chicago, and indicate that Chicagoans are fortunate In the climate they enjoy. Genesis in 1893 Fair. The nickname was one of derision. It had nothing to do with climate, nut arose out of the battle.waged by four cities for the honor of being host to the Columbian Exposition of 1893. "Don't pay any attention," wrole Charles A. Dana in his New York Sun, " to the nonsensical claims of that winCIS, city. Its people could not build a WOrld's fair if they on it." The exposition upset the latter statement at once, but the name has persisted through the years. New York itself tied with Buffalo for the dubious honor of being 1933's windiest city. Each had 98 days during which there was a bree7e of 32 miles per hour or more. Cleveland had 70 such days. Chicago's total was only 11. Lauds Chicago's Climate. " Chicago's climate is one of her least advertised assets," Mr. Rex declared, after analyzing his findings. I think it would be an excellent thing, to open the eyes of both Chicagoans and visitors, if we could have an exhibit et the Worlds Fair to show the advantages Chicago enjoys in regard to weather." New York and Portland, Ore., were tied for the most days in 1933 in which there was dense fog. Each had 25. Sunny Los Angeles was next with 22. Chicago tied with St. Louis.and San Francisco for fifteenth - place with nine foggy days each., - In snow, however, Chicago was near , the head of the list with 48 days when there was a trace of snow. Rochester, , N. Y., led with 82 and Milwaukee was Inext with 65. , - - Chicago is no rainy metropolis, however, the report shows.- Seventeen cities recorded more than the 113 days when it sprinkled here. Only three cities had rain on less than 100 days. while Portland led with 178 days. Chicago was sixteenth in total rainfall with 32 inches during the year. Baltimore, Portland, and Philadelphia all recorded precipitation of more than 50 inches. No Unseasonal Extremes. While seasonally chilly because of its northerly location, Chicago was ti 1934. -,p3S P A GE S ,..1,4 To. -NJ v-62- -0 : 1;;;,, - . -, ml '11 1! 1 ' ,m . MP azipl- '... THIS PAPER CONSISTS OF THREE SECTIONS-SECTION ONR 1 I ft It I I Li! II It ,,111 111 1 (1111'1111; 'ss 1,,I 1 9N,4,1,1 rivt! 1j -- szzlp --a ---1 $2,500 IS AWARDED GIRL SPANKED BY HER KANSAS SCHOOLMATES ( Picture on Back Page.) - Topeka, Kas., April 19.--(A)Miss Georgia Hill, Silvis. 111., was awarded $2,500 by a federal District court jury tonight for injuries which, she contended, resulted from a spanking administered by 10 feminine schoolmates when she was a student in the Good-land, Kas., High school. The verdict included an award of T2,000 actual and $500 punitive damages. Miss Hill had sued for $25.000 for the hazing episode, which occurred the night of Dec. 11, 1931: Judgment for the $2,500 is against any or all of the 10 defendants. but not against their parents. None of the defendants is now of age, but attorneys said the judgment could be held for Collection until each is 21. The price which the 10 girls will be required to pay is considerably higher than what the city settled for in another action in which Miss Hill had sued Goodland for $15,000 under the state mob law. The city settled out of court for $100 and costs amounting to $35. The girls described the episode as a schoolgirl prank and said they spanked Miss Hill lightly. Miss Hill said she was severely beaten and suffered permanent injuries. The spanking was ' administered for an infraction of a 1 student custom prohibiting " dates" to school basketball games. saved from cruel extremes by its shift. ing lake breezes. The monthly mean temperature for the year of 51.7 degrees was seventeenth among the 424 large cities. Hottest were New Orleans (72.1) and Houston (716). Coldest were Minneapolis (47) and Buffalo (48.1). Thirteen other cities bad more than Chicago's 20 days on which the mercury registered 00 degrees or more. Houston topped the list with 89 such torrid days; Seattle and San Francisco had but one each. The highest temperature recorded here, 100 degrees, was equaled by six other cities and surpassed by five more. Topped on Freezing Weather. Chicago had 100 days on which the temperature dropped to freezing or below. Six other cities, topped by Minneapolis' 159 days, had more cold weather. Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New Orleans had no freezing days. Temperatures of zero or below were recorded in 15 of the 24 cities, Chicago having six such days. Only Minneap, ohs and Milwaukee had a greater number. Chicago ranked eleventh In sunshine, yet only seven cities had more clear days. Los Angeles led in both sun and clear days. The sun shone here 56 per cent of all the time possible between the hours of sunup and sundown. BEGIN ATTACKS ON 1111A BILL IN ILLINOIS HOUSE G.O.P.Senators Also in Opposition. Chicago business and industry to be assessed $500,000 within next month to pay costs of enforcing INft k codes. (Details on page 6.) BY PERCY WOOD. - Chicago Tribune Pres!. Service. Springfield, Ill.. April 19.Special.1 Republicans in both houses of the legislature , began a battle today against the Sinnett bill. That bill would znake the state the policing agency behind the NR.A. - - A dozen Republican leaders - said they would fight passage of the bill, introduced yesterday by Representative Thomas P. Sinnett Dem., Rock Island, Gov. Horner's floor leader. It wouid, in effect., they charge, array all state and municipal employés as a special force to see that business codes were enforced. NRA Federal Affair. , The objections raised were varied. but the one most agreed upon was that since the IsTRA is a national effort, its enforcement should be wholly a federal government function. That, for example, was the attitude of both Representatives S. P. Roderick, and David I. Swanson of Chicago. "It is bad enough," Roderick said " that we have these alphabetical organizations running our national government But if the theory is to let them filter into the states, it is even worse." " The bill smacks of dictatorship," Swanson added. " Congress originated it and the federal government should take all responsibility for it. I cannot see why states should be asked to help." " Worse than Dry Law." Other comments were more bitter. Representative Clinton Searle of Rock Island, Republican whip of the house, termed the bill " worse than prohibition." - " I am glad the Crusaders are coming out against this equally noxious thing," he said. "All American citizens should join the Crusaders. The battle now is to see if any American institution shall be preserved." So spontaneous were the protests that Representative Sinnett agreed with the Illinois Manufacturers' association that a full hearing on the bill should be granted before an attempt is made to pass it in the house. The manufacturers are expected to have a sizable delegation in Springfield for the hearing. Sees Snoopers' Régime. Other typical comments came from Representatives Richard J. Lyons Rep., Mundelein, Frederick W. Rennick Rep., Buda, and Lottie Holman O'Neill Rep., Downers Grove. " All state police would become snoopers under this bill," Lyons declared, " but they wouldn't snoop on big business, only the little fellows." Rennick foresaw a situation where even employês of the legislature would become government policemen. " I'm opposed," he said " to a bill which would make the pages of the house and the girl on the telephones detectives for the NRA." Mrs. O'Neill said the bill was " offensive " to her. "Labor has no stronger friend than Lottie Holman O'Neill," she declared, " but when American institutions are threatened, we shouldn't permit it." Senators Ready for Fight. Among the senators who said they would fight the bill, if it reached their chamber, were Thomas P. Gunning Rep., Princeton and Harry G. Wright Rep., De Kalb. These sentiments were freely pressed this this morning before both houses adjourned for the week-end. Since Mr. Sinnett did not attempt to advance the bill to third reading there was no opportunity for them to be aired on the floor. That probably will come next week. Before adjournment, however, the house advanced to third reading the gas tax diversion bill backed by Gov. Horner as a means of increasing the state school distributive fund. Attempts to pass this bill will be made Tuesday and the battle will be hot, with Republicans in the opposition column. Resent Liquor Tax Veto. The minority members are piqued because the governor vetoed their plan Of increasing the funddiversion of t the liquor tax. No debate accompanied advancement of the gas tax bill today, the agreement being that the fight will be made Tuesday. - IN CHICAGO ET-SEMI-EH?, - PRICE TWO CENTS AND SUBURBS THREE CENIS Two Slumber Before Going to Execution (Picture on Back Page.) Three murderersone the killer of a policemanwere executed in the electric than at the county jail as the sun rose this morning. The electrocutions marked a high point in the war against crime which was launched last fall by State's Attorney Courtney and the judges of the Criminal court. Those executed and the order of their execution were: John Scheck, 21 years old, bank robber, who shot a policeman to death in a courtroom during a wild attempt to escape last summer. Ile went to the chair at 5:02 and was pronounced dead at 5:07. George Dale. 29 years old, who killed ad elderly storekeeper during a holdup. Current applied at 5:12; dead at 5:18. Joseph Francis, 35 years old, Negro, slayer of a milk wagon driver in a robbery. Current applied at 5:21; dead at 5:28. Get Extra Hours of Life. The executions started shortly after 5 o'clock. Usually condemned men are pc,t to death a few minutes after midnight 'Sherif Meyering, however, decreed the later hour in order to discourage the morbidly curious who had expressed the desire to attend the electrocutions. All three condemned men managed an hour or two of sleep in the death cell before they were summoned to the glaf; inclosed room which contains the fatal chair. Before they dozed olf Scheck and Dale spent the late evening hours writing letters. Francis occupied himself chiefly in reading the Bible. Earlier in the day Scheck was visited by sixteen relatives, and after the last one had left be weakened. He was the least composed of the three. Dale joked and appeati most buoyant. Both he and Francis boasted they would " go to the chair like men." Scheck Write! to Family. Scheck, while remaining glum throughout the night and even early today, apparently expressed his true feelings in letters. In a note to his family he urged: Please smile and laugh, for that's all that you now can I do. If you'll be hanpy I'll be happy. too. I have only myself to blame." In a lengthy letter addressed to the general public Scheck sought to extenuate his crime. He blamed his downfall on circumstances and toe depression and he excused himself because he was only a boy. " The thought never occurred to any one during the trial to show the circumstances of John Scheck as a mere boy who was lured and tempted into the life of crime because of his intense devotion to his parents and to his home that they were about to be deprived of as victims of a nation-wide economic depression," stated Scheck in this letter. Says Kin Faced Loss of Support. Then Scheck's letter went on to say that at the time e killed the policeman in court he was being held for another crime and that he did not want to go to prison because then his family would be deprived of his support " So John Scheck plotted the escape which resulted in failure and the unfortunate death of a policeman," he wrote. Farther on after a few paragraphs about psychology and behaviorism, which jail attachés said he had been studying in recent weeks he wrote that ' as a boy John Scheck is fighting a battle to live in g,ief and sorrow for a mistake that is very close to him." Hale Writes to " Tigress." Killer Dale was not so profuse in his writing. He addressed a short note to Mrs. Eleanor Jarman, " the blonde tigress," now serving a prison term of 199 years or the murder for which Dale was to die. He told her he had not forgotten her. "I wish to thank you," he wrote, " for all the happy moments we have spent together." Then he sent love to her and the " two boys," he children. All three killers, Dale, Scheck and (Continued on page 16. column 1.) Help for HOUSEWIVES! -- Be-thrifty! Before you do your week-end food shopping, take advantage of all the help today's Tribune offers you Read Paul Potter's article on Page 18 and check the advertisments on Pages 18, 19 and 20. , Tune in W-G-N at 2 this afternoon for At an, AI eade's F ood Tips. D1LLINGER GIVEN VIARM l'IELC0171E IN HOME TOWN Suspected in Pana Bank Robbery. Mooresville, Ind., April 19.Sp.. . cial.--John Di Ringer, America'a most notorious outlaw, of the present day. hunted though be may be by Wipe everywhere. else, still is a welcome-vieitor in his old home town. - This disclosure: was made today after it was reported Dillinger led gang of three aidd into the First.lcSTtional bank of Pana, 111., at 8 aZIA. and, after terrorizing bank employes, fled with $27,629. Later 4investigation cast doubt: on the theory that the bank raid was conducted by Dillingees gang. Dispatches from Pana said that employés of the bank could not identify photographs of the Mooresville boy. It appeared to be established; ,hnwever, that the leader of the robbers dragged one of his legs as he walked and one witness who saw the start of the gang's flight from the bank averred that:the limping man resembled pictures he ha e seen -of Dillinger. - Pays Visit to Father. It has been established that linger was shot March 31 in St. Pauli, Minn., while fleeing a trap set for him by federal agents. Mooresville knows that he has since been here,. dragging' the injured leg and paying his filial respects to John Dillinger Sr. Old John today admitted this without quibbling. " 0, yes," he said " John cams down here to look in on me. He was hurt in the leg a little, but not much. I don't aim to tell no lies even to keep things like that quiet. I didn't tell the .police because they didn't ask me." The statement of the elder Dillinger was made to a newspaper reporter who had heard gossip through this little town about his being here and went to the best source for confirma. tion. . , Petition Asks "Amnesty?! :- So great is the sympathy of Moores-vine for its own. Robin Hood that a petition is being circulated request,. ing Gov. Paul V. McNutt to grant Dillinger " amnesty " if he surrenders. The paper, in charge of John Rcnie . states that he. was given an unfair sentence when he was first convicttd of robbing a grocery. Rowe said ile had many signatures from residents of Indianapolis as well as Mooresvilig. Al G. Feeney, state safety director, was solemnly critical of the people of Mooresville for their failure to report the presence among them of the hunted fugitive, although they knew he was at the elder DI flinger's home. " It is unusual," he said, "for a community to withhold such information for days and then to let it reach the newspapers in a Way that die- Iparages the ' police. I simply can't 1 , understand it," Leach Knows the Law! Matt Leach, captain of the state police, asserted that he bad no intention of questioning old John. " What good would it do?" he demanded. " Dillingees been and gone. and under the law the old man bas a right to protect his son." All the criticizing wasn't ' done by the authorities, however. Old John had a word or two of unfavorable comment for Sherif Lillian Holley of Lake' county, from whose jail at Crows Point the son fled on March 3- " The sherif made it too easy for John," he declared. " He didn't have to spend a lot of money to get out of there with his little wooden gun." Robbery Calm and Leisurely. The Pana robbery was staged in leisurely manner. - The four robbers, arriving in the town shortly - after sunup, breakfasted in a restaurant and then in a leisurely manner drove over to the bank. While one man stayed in the car, the limping leader and the other pair walked into the bank doors. At the time the janitor, Godfrey. Schmitz, was washing windows.. Taking possession of his keys, they compelled him to accompany them to rear door. through which they entered. Inside were only two persons. Assistant Cashier W. C. Kerr and Miss Kathryn Johnston, a clerk. Miss Johnston, forced to sit on the floor, was guarded by one man. Another made Kerr open the vaults. The third, the man with the limp. stood at the door. Three girl employes. arriving soon afterward. were compelled to sit in chairs while the lame bandit covered them with a machine gun.. Gather Cash for Half Ilottr.--, In less than a halt hour the gang had gathered the money into two suits cases and departed. ' They drove, it was reported. toward Taylorville, A14 I ( w ., . - 1 . -1 , - , , . , . . I ti or 0 , , 1 1 . ' , 4, ittioA0 100 IM2. . . Elf,:-' 4.. , ..r C El 14 II 113 , ' ' i L n , , 4 PAYI10 MORE! - A , , , , , mit THE 'WORLD'S , GREATEST. NEWSPAPER ... ., VOLUME XCIII.--NO. 95 REG. U. S. PAT. OFk'ICE. COFYRIGHT 1934 C BY THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE.) --,-) o FRIDAY. APRIL 20. 1934. S PAGES oRNsscoNEscisTTiosNoroN- is ,,..,,, PRICE rsT CHICAGO ELSEWITERII ' AND SUBURBS , THREE CENIS ..., ' THR7EHEISSPEtPTIE - ' , . , , )(4) p)t) 0. . ,.. i ri L."4)11 Fll 73 Li) sym-b, - P ....F,,, ? ,, ,,,,,, E TWO CENTS (11( ,J . i .. i f. ; ), Lamgltv LI t L......-1 L La., . la ,,...a, , . . , . . , , . J a NAtlitING DEFIES NEWS SUMMARY 11,1 ' ON OUR WAY ' . I BEGIN ATTACKS 1 Two Slumber D1LLINGER GIVEN 1 of The Tribune 11111 11111 '1 11111 1)1, l'11)111,1111 Il lit,111 1, 1.1111 i 1 ! (II IIII 1 il III ' i I Before Goin ilif g 1 I lit A, nows,,,,,a ;;,ii , 11)1 1. il 11111 .1' I 1. .1 1 'III . ti ON iiiill BILL IN ; jApANEsEn Buys , 1 t And Plitorical c1164.614"...40111111..g0Mil I 1 1111111 Illp I I C a Alitt 1 LCOIIIE ,, scrap Book) I 1 1,'''lli ) 1 11 )1 1 iI III ,)illi 11 liliiiii,liiii ii 11 ,; , , 1., Ili iti 11 1 , 11,1, i to Executton - - pr 7 Fr,day., i April 20. 1934 ' I i p 6e I 1 , 1 1 1 111,1,11 II 1 .. 1 i 4 Iti; 1 1, I 1 '11 ' 1 111 II Ilc',(s,Lji,:1111,(1 11 I , , I , 3 kir . 1 I I 01 I It I ,1 I 111'11 11.1.11NOIS. HOOSE, : (picture on RaecxiceP atge.) in the 1 , It , ,H. 0 III E O'l N 1,0"1,. II '11!,,11; 1111r1111 11111 Iliiii0,011.11111i-4,ii'') 0'111'1111' '1'11'1 II ' l't i 1 1 '' 1 ,, 1,,, ,,,,1 1 1 1 ,,11 1, ,1 it - ,, I Ill ,, ,, 'rhree murderers--one the killer of 1 policemanwere u I Three slayers che at tizoN a in elec. 1 ' ' Ill;1'0 31 Ill' '1111111N 111 , illhillillillit, III t,,i 1, 1 it,. ,': .611'41111111 ill, i(1 IP, '1111,1 11111n 1111 , I, 11 III 11:11 ,iertie ch2lr 0 t tip county 'mil as - 1 ii,1111. 1,11. 11,1 1 II .1 ill it 11, 1111111111111,111111,1111VVIV.1,11.1.1.1.1,,,,,111,1111111,11 11,11.111,1111.1111111i1111111111.11,11 1111..-11, I tile chair; two write leiter in tinal IT1111111'111111111111111111111111111,11111tithinfliildia,11111111'fillitillP1111,1filillilliiiiIIII'Vi111111111111V11111111111111111 hour. Page 1. 1h1:111111!IIILIIIIIIT-IP111111:111,11111111111'11014 (!!1I 11111111111111 Iii iii 1.1,19,,,:o., vgE6art.;iit , ofr.D 1 1 1 1 Statistics re cal Chica2,o s livable P 'II' iii,(4,(1,0,ti-r,ly4m4., 444,11iiillit DICTAT it:t:1-gulaiHtil- n,l'ill 11'1111,111 i'llii,iiiillYoll-''-'7'11A il III 11111 climate, show lug city outnotte in hot- I I I 50CiALIST I ,,,,,, I I. 1 - k7 I I, ter, colder, and windier clli, b in i y any 1,1 I i i.., N 1,,, 4tt)k 1 1 - ORSHIP I I ('I her municipalitie r e 1 s. ag. i , 1 1 il' ': : 2 40'04- .-- -,-- ze i 11 ,1II 1ic ,-, WO 1 1.1 f R- 7' t l'.1 ' r ) ,HE b k trial on meetin ith Al Capo I Aid. Oscar Nelson quizzed in racket Ili' ( g wne; he 111 , 0 11 i- RSE - )1 . 1,i pi! -,!-----c.tr--- - -- 4A))70 cif i t, I sl , , 5 4,k44 ilgtti,,itil .1 insists meeting with gangster was ac- fi I It i eill'''' -" 'If 1111,.112-111: ,-',&) - - ! .7.11- Ie. IV II Alexander I I II pay his first vi ill , 1 i cidental. Page 2. 1 I I rrilli, I II ' 0 II , II tp,11,12."-Ili-Ttf I- i 11111 I 11 ( , ."'N k, - -- t - 1--,,. ii 11! ! 1 Troyanovsky, new soviet 1 I 1)' t il N:l' 1 I 'll 1111111 1 1 111 I 1 1 1,1 11 r lirli 1111 It- -----r-----...-f- 111111 II 1 111111) ItII ambassador, will sit to Oil I 1 11, ' I tilltits III 14'Filliiiiiiiillit 1 --A - I I! ifillittrit, I Ohionn n tevin v l'ace 4. i 11 I I i 1 "P-- il I' . co" II ; I; ; I 1 itiliffittl'itillifi I 1111 (1111111'.111 -illitilriii,,,..7Ress i 1 II, 1 II 4, 'c 111111iI111111 t'Iril II 1 illi V-...r ..--V 1 1 1 ' A 'V Nó FoR II! ill f1,11 C,,,, li 1 C?1 i ---- 11111 II ,.'"f-tteCr All toN , , 11 I ilI l 14.) 1 iiiS PAL '10!11 1 I iii 1 9)- ,..s5 .. ...... - L. ,? I '1,,,k, ,' Ili 11, 1 , I 111 T 47t , ca -- - ,-7;- - -, v't2-- --"-- . ,ca, .... . .. ..-- . .... ,-2.- ..,---1-2 .... "--.., .. , 11 1111, dt4 1)... '5' e , - ...,....,, .... .- w. .., 0 -NI , 1 111111 11 4.1 'V .. ... ---- ! 1 : I 1 i 0 3 -7 Se -- -7---,,, .4, 1, S 4,...-b... I ( ill I .1 tC, . 4) Aa 1111111111111, A t(ri . 71 ..'N:, ; r rs ,., ., ...- -4--.,,111? 1 0 '1.r) , - -- --.7-4 I I 1 1 N IA -1C'è ,, tl'e. 4 - -,. -- , ' I - '1-0( . , cA:' 1)- --f .------------. ,,:r) t , e-da 4e,....- -J.,. 11-- .-S:A. 17.-:: ----,----- Wizil i-4., 4- , - ...-..e --,--,- 'flee- ,.-----------,-,.---- ....-1--, zzo, ....- .vioa - ----&z,- ,---- Q. ...e... --------...:------;-: - --':-.---"-'1.-. '- -7. -,-- ..-- --.....- -....71 ---"" ------------1--- - -----:----- , -".- - - ,...---, ..4 ....-- ---------------------- --------------- ...- -- ---..----- a-----------72- -- .....10111111111111111"'". ".---,... --- ---, -:--------- --,......-------,-- - --- ----,--------, -- --- ------ ., , 1. ..M I. . ' a rose out of the battle 'waged by foie,- The price which the 10 girls will - - - - - ' , 1. 1.1L, die- he the newspapers in a Way that ,. maintained through t he collective ef. Tel th , chat with Roosevelt on press and intend ed victims - battle put tip by e . .. Sees Snoopers . man in court beild for that both robbers fled as soon as No. 1! cities for the honor of being host to be required to pay is considerably Other ecal t parages the ' police. I, simply , can't forts of all n w ations directed at the re- Ne Deo, 1.age 8 lie gotten hi finger away from the the Columbian Exposition of 1893. I Representatives Richard J Lyons want to go to prison because then his understand it . higher than what the city settled for e'r comments caRegimeme from another crime and t he was at ng he di h .$1 not ' ' , , d s ! " move) of fundamental sources of Inc - District of Columbia grand jury con- d p D t b entist. A air of spectacles worn y i on pay any attention- ' e e . . . . . . , , , - - wrote 1 in another action in which Miss Hill Fen R Mundelein Frederick 'W family t tion . no single state has the right to demns practice of " selling political in- the bitten bandit were left behind De- : Charles A. Dana in his New York had sued Goodland for $15,000 under ' ould be deprived of his sup Le ch a ep. . . - w. Knows the Law. claim the exclusive responsibility for fiuence " in Washington. Page 10. tectives Roy Kindt and Guy Willough- ! to th.e non.seneical claims of the state mob law. The city settle.lida, and Lottie Holman port Matt Leach captain of the state . , , , . maintaining international peace in , . by last ni-ht started a search font 1 O'Neill d nick Rep , BRep., Downers Grove. ' , " So John Scheck plotted the escape h lid' it'n TRIBUNE Vi IDER MARlyET DRIVE. " "' . . i that mantle citse Its people could not out of court for $100 and costs amount- any designated part of the world. se ointine, man with an injured digit., . "All state police would become which resulted in failure and the un- Denma rk wants reciprocal treaty ' I build a world's fair if they won it." ing to $35. tion of questioning old John. - " China bas never h arbored any in . . .,,, ---es" - --- schTohoelggirirlipsradensck rainbeddsathide tehpelysosdpeanaksead bill" Lyons de- p e police asserted that e a no n e . fortunate death of a policeman " be a What good would it do?" he de- 1 with Is. S. to expand trade. Page es. , The exposition upset the latter state snoopers under this , tention of injuring any nation or of ', ment at once, but the name hag per dared, " but they wouldn't snoop on wrote. Farther on after a few pare- 1 SPORTS. Laura Ingalls Lands in causing a far eastern disturbance. , big business, only the little fellows." graphs about psychology and behavior . and under the law the old man has a, beat Reda 4-1 So 1 ; x w 1 i p Tigers, Porto Rico on lit H . Flig - ome sisted through the years. Miss Hill lightly. Miss Hill said she . 1 Chi n a Cubs 's collaboration with other na- Rennick foresaw a situation where 9-8. Pa e e 95 : New 'York itself tied with Buffalo even employes of the legislature would been studying in recent weeks - attaches SI ism, which jail at said he had mended. " Dillinger's been and gone,. right to protect his son." '' .. I was :severely beaten and suffered per manent injuries. The spanking was tions. whether through loans or tech- ' '' SAN SCAN, Porto Rico, April 19.-- , Ifor the dubious ,honor of being 19e3's , he All the criticizing wasn't ' done by Fed Sox beat Q,P n a t o rs i nical assistance, has been strictly lim- ' - (Ile-Laura Ingalls landed on American windiest city. Each had 98 days dur. government policemen . become gover t -wrote that " as a boy ,John Scheck is the authorities, however. Old John r heade . n double Page 25- soil ibis evening after a flight through I administered for an infraction of a . ited to matters of a nonpolitical char- " to ' I'm opposed," he said, a bill seolith America. The United Sta tee l ing which there was a breerse of 32 fighting a battle to live in gief and had a word or two of unfavorable corn- octet'. The purchase of military equip. Londoe meets Garibaldi in return b student cuetom prohibiting " " bout tonight. Page 25. 11Yer flew here today from Port -of- , ne s per C e i ile c hour or more 1 Ireland ) to school basketba ' ll which would make the pages of the sorrow for a mistake that is very close ment for Sherif Lillian Holley of Lake m ' ent such as airplanes and the em- Spain, Trinidad. I had 70 such days. Chicago's total w games. dates as house and the girl On the telephones to him." - county, from whose 'jail- at Crows ployment of military instructors is for Root to pitch today in m Cubs' game !only 11. detectives for the NRA.." ' ' Dale Writes to " Tigress." Point the son fled on March 3. no other purpose than national de- at St. Louis. s'age 27. ic 's " I .atids Chego's Clitnate. saved from cruel extremes by its shift- Mrs O Neill said the bill wa offen- Killer Dale was not so profuse in his " The sherif made it too easy, for fense and to maintain order within Terry crashes homer; Giants beat t he country. Phils, 2 to O. Page 21. THE WEATHER " Chicago's climate is one of her nlake breezes The monthly ig . mean sive " nd to her. "Labor has no stronger writing frie than I,ottie Holman O'Neill," seared. " He didn't have .' Ile addressed a short note to John," he de least advertised assets," Mr. Rex des temperature for the year of 51.7 de- Mrs. Eleanor Jarman, " the blonde to spend a lot of money to get out of "No country which does not harbor Highly rated horses nominated for - d " but when American in - she declare tigress , ,'" now serving a prison term there with his little wooden gun." FRIDAY, APRIL. 20. 1934. dared, after analyzing his findings. grees was seventeenth among the '24 ulterior designs against China need en- Illinois Derby. ' - Page 28. stitutions are threatened, we shouldn't of 199 years or the murder for which "I think it would be an excellent large cities. Hottest were New Or Robbery Calm and Leisurely. I tertain fears concerning China's policy EDITORIALS. Suori.e. 5.03 a. m.; sunset. 6:36 p. m. . , Dale was to die. He told her he had ,. permit it of national reconstruction and eecu- In Defense of Americanism; Our Moon sets at 1:11 a. m. tomorrow. Venus 1 thine, to open the eyes of both Chi- leans (72.1) and Houston 1 (7 -6). Cola. not forgotten her. " I wish to thank The Pena robbery was staged is a morniuz star. uNE cagoans and visitors, if we could have eat were Minneapolis (47) and Buffalo Senators Ready for Fi ht. Sena ors ea y g rity. Regarding the , present Sino- Fighting Front Against Crime; A Pub- THE TR1B .. you," he wrote, " for all the happy leisurely manner. - The four robbers, ago and vielnitit Chie . - BAROMETER. . an exhibit at the World's Fair to (48.1). Among the senators 'who said they moments we have spent together." arriving in the town shortly - after Japanese situation, peace between the lic Debt to Factor; The Illinois NRA. -Generally fair and I' age ' th -.,----'---,., show e advantages Chicago enjoys Thirteen other citi es bad more than would fight the , , , bill if it reached th. eir Then be sent love to her and the " two sunup, breakfasted in a restaurant two countries depends' on good will rage IS. rather mot today; tN and mutual understanding. Hence FINANCE. CO3131ERCE., tomorrow lair and SI, s,, in regard to weather." Chicago's 20 days on which the mer- chamber, were Thomas P. Gunning boys," he children. and then in a leisurely manner drove moderately cool. ,' s'ZN New York and Portland, Ore., were cury registered 90 degrees or more Fen. Princeton and Harry G. Wright All three killers, Dale, Scheck and over to the bank. While one ' man the unfortunate state of affairs can Armour directors will pass on recap- - moderate northern It A I' r..-.., I, tied for the most days in 1933 in which Ilouston topped the list 'with 89 such Rena De Kalb. (Continued on page 16. column Li stayed in the car, the limping leader only be rectified when Sine-Japanese italization plan today. Page 31. winds tomorrow. I ' relations are established 'on a new Reveal 1,000 closed banks have not Illinois -ther c Is a I r an todaY ti 'S. ize ) lmey Los Angeles was next with 22. had but one each. The highest tern here was dense fog. Each had 25. torrid days; Seattle and San Francisco These sentiments were freely ex- . and the other pair walked into the ' 4.' ' 1 S pressed this morning before both : bank doors. raool , y-ti i basis of the mutual aspirations of the asked federal aid. - - I'age 31 tomorrow lair and - --- z houses adjourned for the week-end. 1 , two countries." ' eteeS-6sta-s Chicago tied With St. Louis and San Perature recorded here, 100 degrees, At the time the janitor, Godfrey Prof. Irving Fisher assails New Plightly warmer. ---- , Francisco for fifteenth - place with was equaled by six other cities and Since Mr: Sinnett did not attempt to , r Schmitz, was washing windows.. TakAttack Tokio's Statement. ' Dealers for " Russian ways." Page 31. - Chinese newspapers and public , - Chicago banks move to cut interest TEMPERATURES IN CHICAGO nine foggy days each. , . surpassed by five more. advance the bill to third reading there ing possession of his keys, they corn- or In snow, however, Chicago was near Topped on Freezing Weather. was no opportunity for them to be the head of pelled him to accompany them to -a ganieations meanwhile ' united In an on savings to 2 per cent. Page 54 3 OO 1 1. the list with 48 days when Chicago had 100 days on which the flo or aired on the oor. That probably will S 1 HOUSEW I - V E rear door. through which they entered. MAXIMI'3, NN outburst against the Japanese stete- Wheat slumps; Wallace predicts less . eiteisiest. 2 A. m 40 there was a trace of snow. Rochester, temperature dropped to freezing come next week. Inside were only two persons,: As- nt of policy Which was designated spread in world prices.' Page 31. istaximute a year ago, 50; minimum, 411 N. Y., led with 82 and Milwaukee was belo' w. S - ix other cities . topped by ''' Before adjournment however, the it . . C. err C K and Miss sistant Cashier W. as similar to the 21 demands which Stock market is upset by wheat 8 a. 111.... 49 Noon 64 8 p. m....46 next with 65. - house advanced to third reading the 7,,,r . - 46 - , - Minneapolis' 159 days. had more cold . Kathryn Johnston, a clerk Japan presented China in 1915. -- - break; preferred list higher. Page 32. 45 tia: ra.....:4416 ;I?.. pp.: natl.:: :;..41 u p 9n colli. if-. your wee ts Attem d f t b t l d h Chicago is no rainy metropolis, how- eas tax diversion bill backed by Gov. weather. Los Angeles, San Francisco, - Miss The Chunghua Jib Pao declared: a a. m....45 3 P. Si V 10 P. tn....44 -- Be-thrifty! Before you do bi Johnston, . forced to sit on th Horner as a means of increasing the Distillers' marketing pact near end; ever, the report shows.- Seventeen cit. and New Orleans had no freezing days- ' floor was guarded by one man. An "Japan assumes responsibility for parity grain price fails Page 33 - . ' . 75 aa: rn::::4479 1 pp.. rimi 4i; ;41idnii.i.rnhit.,:: 4 3 42 les recorded more than the 113 days state school uns p yk-end food shopping, . Temperatures of zero or below were other made Kerr open the vaults. The mai . ntaming peace in the orient, but 9 a. tn....51 6 p. m 47 1 a. m....41 Cattle decline on larger supply- when it sprinkled here. Only three to pass this bill will be made Tuesday take advantage of all the help . . - lo a. in....52 7 p. m -46 2 a. m -40 recorded in 15 of the 24 cities. - Chicago the man with the lim - , third, , p. stood I' find only evidences of Japan's acts d the battle will b A p 1., and ae wie hot ,. with Repb- today S Tribune offers you : lambs rise. hogs steady. ' Page 34. 11 a. in.....53 cities had rain on less than 100 days. having six such days. Only Minneap- it u at the door. Three girl employes,arof aggression, the occupation of Man- . s Want Ad index. Page 31. Vor 24 hours ended 7, p. m. April 19: while Portland led with 178 days. Chi- ohs and Milwaukee had a greater num- licans in the opposition column. soon afterward. were compelled churia, the invasion of Shanghai. the Mean temperature, 53 degrees; normal. 48 cago was sixteenth in total rainfall ber. Resent Liquor Tax Veto. , Read' Paul Potter's article riving annexation of Jehol, and the creation on PaPre 18 and check the ad- to sit in chairs while the lame bandit de:gm:ince:7x for ex- with 32 inches during the year.. Bal- Chicago ranked eleventh in sun- , The minority members are piqued . e, covered them with a machine gun., of disturbances in North China. Hence Average net paid circulation I timore, Portland, and Philadelphia all ments ages on Pao- 18, 19 Precipitation, trace; deficiency for April. shine, yet only seven cities bad more because the governor vetoed their plan vertis ' Gather Cash for Half Hour. China will never tolerate Japanese March 1934 . , , . .38 of an inch; deficiency since Jan. 1. recorded precipitation of more than clear days. Los Angeles led in both of increasing the fund-diversion of and 20 ." s' - , In less than a halt hour the gan monopoly g THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE 4.43 inches. . - 60 inches sun and clear days. The sun shone the liquor tax. No debate accompanied , The Chen Pao, organ of Marshal Barometer. 7 a. m.. 29.94: 7 p. m., 30.03 had gathered the money into two sults Highest wind velocity, 23 miles- an hour No Unseasonal Extremes. , here 56 per cent of all the time pos- advancement of the gas tax bill today, Tune in W-G-N at 2 cases and departed. ' They drove, 11 Chiang Kai-shek. virtual dictator of DAILY 775 000 exceisns of t Iron, the northwest at 1:45 p. While seasonally chilly because of Bible between the hours of sunup and the agreement being that the fight will this afternoon for At an, siCantinned on page 6. column L1 ,IF.'---1 ((Metal weather table on page 33.1 its northerly location, Chicago was sundown be made Tuesday. Al eade's F o o il, ti d TiP S s was reported. towardw Taylorville., 4 t ... i .? . e i e- t e ses , e ' , t as ' a - , .. , $500,000 Levy

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