Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on November 14, 1930 · 4
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 4

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Chicago, Illinois
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Friday, November 14, 1930
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4
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I -,-,,, i 1 I t MOWN nOlk CRAPE CROVERS DEFY REPORTED CAPONE THREAT leader Says They'll Go On with 'Wine Maker.' Donald 11. Conn. managing director' of Fruit Industries. Ltd, and of the' California Vineyardists association, last night took official cognizance of the reported threats of Al Capone banning the introduction of new grape concentrates into Chicago, with a atatemertt that his organizations would Xo ahead and "take a chance " with hostile bootleggers and racketeers. Mr. Conn was reached at the Union League club where he registered yesterday for a visit before his departure today for San Francisco. Defiant to Capone. At the club Mr. Conn was besieged with telephone messages and telegrams from all sections of the country inquiring into the truth of published reports on the west coast that gangsters, supposedly inspired by Capon. had warned officials of Fruit Industries and kindred concerns that their new grape by-product. which ferments into wine, would not be permitted in Chicago and other large centers. Mr. Conn said this fermentation was legal." The "Capone threat" spread rapidly on the west coast, and the reports even bad the Chicago gangster In Los Angeles. "1 presume the bootleggers and racketeers are after us." said Mr. Conn. "Why not? The most vicious elements lit the country are perhaps - the bootleggers and racketeers who have lived on law violations. Fruit e industries, backed by government funds and conducting all Its activities according to law . will take its chances with the racketeers and bootleggers. "It will protect the law Itself. Its agencies. and its customers." !leech, 1,000 Threats. In almost the same breath Mr. Conn belittled the gangster scare. He did not know the source of the reported threats, he said, but added that they were " not unexpected." Threats were not unusual. Mr. Conn said They have poured in on him, his associates, and the organizations like rain drops. more than 1.000 having been received. he said. They were not related, he pointed out, to the new concentrates product. According to Mr. Conn, the concentrates are " within the law," and naturally, he said. " those engaged in unlawful distribution of Illegal liquors resent any plan of Industry to conform with the law." The concentrates aro to be introduced in Milwaukee as a test and sold In approximately 400 stores and pharmacies. They will next be offered on the markets of Chicago and New York. Threats, real or fancied. of gangsters will not deter the marketing of the concentrates. he said. Mrs. Mabel Walker Willebrandt, former dry leader, is said to be lawyer for the grape Industries. Scare Minimized Hero. In Chicago the " Capone scare" was minimized. Mr. Conn said he was frIARSHALL FIELD & COMPANY AT -- - OW 111 ,,, . ,,ta -- ., .9- -... ,.Z.,,tSo ....,! 111.... 6-4, INDICT 1 EDITOR FOR LINKING CAPONE TO FLORIDA GOVERNOR Sebring. Fla., Nov. 13.--8pecia1.1-- The Highlands county grand jury to. day returned an indictment with two counts against Fred Eberhardt, editor and publisher of the Florida State News of Tallahassee; on 'charges of criminally libeling (lov. Carlton. One count was based en publication of statement credited to Vincent Giblin. Al .2apone 's Miami attorney. In Eberhardt's "inside story about the Carlton administration, in which Giblin was alleged to say that Capone paid Jimmy Lynch of Miami $25.000 for the privilege of operating gaming tables in Miami with the "distinct understanding" it W R for Gov. Carlton and Marne Martin, his secretary, after Lynch got his cut. The Indictment ref to Capone as "Al Capone thereby meaning one Al Capone. a person reputed and believed by public of state of Florida to be a person of vicious. dissolute. low. immoral. depraved and lawless habits and character." not acquainted with the situation here either as to Capone or other hoodlums. According to L. H. Fisher, Chicago manager of Fruit Industries, hi concern had received no warnings from Capone, as stated in a dispatch from Fresno. Cal. The dispatch said that Capone's Chicago headquarters had threatened 'to blow the heads off" of persons marketing the concentrates In Chicago. New York hoodlums bad Issued similar ultimatums in respect to the east, it was reported. The reputed threats created a stir In offIcial circles at Washington, it was reported. The reports were that representatives of the concentrates promoters had conferred on the matter with government authorities. This was denied by G. Aaron Youngquist, special assistant attorney general in charge of prohibition. ?co Interference at Present On the other hand, Washington authorities evinced more interest in the test sales promotion in Milwaukee. For the present there will be no interference. according to Attorney General William D. Mitchell. It was pointed out from another source that the Fruit Industries was a subsidiary of the California grape control board and is indirectly one of the beneficiarles of the federal farm board, which has extended to the grape control board a credit of $14,000,000. It was this to which Mr. Conn alluded when he said the industry was " backed" by the government. Disinclination of the federal officials to take a. hand in the concentrates enterprise is said to have a relation to Mrs. Willebrandt's connection with the grape industries. 1 Hunt Capone In Los Angeles. Los Angeles, Cal., Nov. 13.-44:1-- Tips of kidnaping plots and newspaper reports of the presence of " Scarface Al" Capone. Chicago gang leader, in southern California sent heads of three law enforcement agencies into a secret conference today to plan action against " an invasion of gangsters." The danger of the situation was outlined by District Attorney Buron who said " it is time to take concerted Hints of kidnaping plots and newspaper action against these criminals." A report of Capone's arrival here sent detectives in a vain search for the gangster. zokr" -40tk $12" ,A , ese t h A ristosof this fine quality, now shown for the first time at $12.50 Aristo specifications throughout. The same selected leathers, the same detailed workmanship have been put into this new line of Aristos at this low price. , 1Black suede four eyelet oxford with black calf trim, - 1-inch continental heel. Also in mat kid with genuine black lizard trim. 2Mat kid, Tstrap sandal with black lizard trim; two inch spanish heel. 3Mat kid, instep strap style with center buckle. Black ) and white jay& lizard trim, P-inch continental heel. FIFTH FLOOR MIDDLE, WABASH SIMILAR STYLES IN BOTH SUBURBAN STORES .-.1M....., ,:aiMEM.0.o WHAT THEY SAY ELSEWHERE OF CHICAGO CRIME Whatever It Is, This City Gets No Breaks. New York. Nov. 13.---(Speciall--- New York newspapers seldom overlook an opportunity to feature a Chicago crime story on the front page Or to give editorial advice to that city in Its efforts to curb lawlessness. No shooting or robbery or what not seems to trivial for headline notice provided it carries a Chicago date line. "Bombardiers." "Pineapple throw-ere." "machine gunners," and other such gentry made notorious by the operations of Mr. " Al" Capone and his ilk have long since become the headline writers' delight; Phraseology descriptive of their doings are his treasured atock in trade. The Theme Is Sarcasm. Much of the editorial comment dealing with the city's efforts to stamp out its gangland denizens is written in a sarcastic vein phrased to give the Impression that the Capones, the Alellos, and the like have grown too big to handle and that the city must perforce grin and bear it as best it can. Occasionally. however, the molders of public opinion grow deadly serious In their suggestions. Only the other day (Nov. 5) the New York World, in commenting editorially on the charge of Chief Justice McCoorty of the Cook county Criminal court to the grand jury relative to Gangster Capone's proposals of a truce, solemnly Informed its readers that "Chicago must deal with its gunmen with weapons of the law or paint out the I Will' upon its shield of wood. not steel, and inscr'be in its place I can't.'" - The Herald-Tribune found occasion for a bit of facetiousness upon the occasion of the robbery of Mrs. William Hale Thompson. wife of the Chicago mayor. opining that " the robbery was probably a mistake," for, said the Herald-Tribune, " Chicago criminals are not given to setting upon politi. clans or, their relatives unless they happen to be members of an opposing faction." Blunders Worse Than Crime. The editorial "dig" concluded: "Of courses some blunders are worse than crimes and this one might lead to a serious breach between of. ficialdom and the underworld, with consequences beyond prediction. The police themselves might get mad, to say nothing of 'Big Bill:" etc. The Times, which generally takes its editorials seriously, devoted a half column or so about the same time to informing its readers that the Thompson robbery should not be permitted to " give the impression that crime is Increasing in that city," and to setting forth statistics to show a marked -,, od , 0 It' (.4) EACCK SHE SHP cYcacncI Climes geacoe.Alloct; ccPas Arch dhows STATE' STREET ENTRANCE - PAU 11..R HOUSE gle you're fashion-wisè d -1 , we ea you o e Bes HOSIL.ery Duys Allft;1471S Profluor "If you are sinOin the ues...t the new values in Gordon stockinOs will L ceer you up, cluickly, If I went on to tell you what marvelous values they really are, you might charge me with exaggeration. so, I'll 1 p.ay safe. You inspect the hose. But, let me call your attention to a sparklinO value Gordon sheer chiffontnarrow heel stockings, in idl colours, and at a price that will be respectful to your pocketbook 11 , $ Como to our two hosiery tlepartmenta for new values In Gorclon Hosiery. p.1541.3541.63, 82. Gortion 11-line and Narrow Heel styles. Mal raters Gwen Prompt Attenti.ols PEACCK Shoe Creations, $10 to $25 PIRATES ATTACK LINER -- ROB 200 AND KIDNAP TWO Chicago Tribune rreso Service.' AN;ov. 13.--The Norwegian steamer Hirundo, which plies between Hongkong. Swatow, and Bangkok. Siam. 'was attacked by pirates yesterday in Bias bay. The pirates took the steamerinto Mira bay, where they thoroughly looted it. Two Chinese merchants were kidnaped to be held for ransom. The passengers. including more than 200 Chinese, were robbed. The vessel sailed from Hongkong last Saturday. The pirates joilped the ship as passengers. They attacked the bridge and engine room simultaneously at a prearranged signal decrease in the bombings and other phases of crime for the first nine months of the year. The Times, edi. tonal concluded: "Chicago seems to be gaining on her bombardiers." The Evening Post still finds occasion to refer to the city as Al Ca-pones Chicago "--the latest appear. ance of the phrase being in an editorial on theatrical affairs 4n today's Issue of the paper. and its afternoon contemporaries follow much the same bend when the spirit moves them. What Washington Reads. 'Chicago Tribune Press Service. Washington, D. C., Nov. 13.----(Special.--A Washingtonian who reads nothing but his home town papers would never know that Chicago worried enough about its Crime to fight It. Reports through one of the press associations concerning some new Chicago gang outbreak are printed, though not always featured. But news about any action taken to combat crime In Chicago seldom appears. To judge by the space it receives In Washington papers, Al Capone's name has more news value than that of any other Chicagoan. Editorially. the Washington press looks upon Chicago crime in a benevolently, sometimes malevolently, humor. our manner. For example, the Washington Post of Nov. 5' commented on Judge McGoorty's refusal of Capone's offer of truce as follows: "0, justice, what opportunities are lost in thy name! Judge McGoorty of the Criminal court spurned Capone's offer, and told the grand Jury that the time bad come when the pub. lie must choose between the rule of the gangster and the rule f law. This means, according to an ancient and established custom, that the good people of , Chicago will try to live under a rule of law and that Scarface Al will go off In a huff and start up a new racket, besides maintaining all of his old ones. It means that the police must keep up the pretense of pursuing criminals, while, In fact, encouragink. them. " It begins to look as if Chicago will never have peace and tranquillity until the people turn out and elect Mr. Capone mayor." And the Washington Star remarked recently: " Charges that he used gunmen to sway a Chicago election suggest that 15 ,.m..m..0 -; BY OSCAR HEWITT. Chicago is credited with supplying more effective protection to the motorist against theft of his rar than any other city In the country of 600,000 population or more. except Philadel Phia. Chicago has less automobile stealing, In proportion to population, than any other city of the nation containing 440,000 inhabitants, except Philadelphia, Buffalo, and Kansas City. Mo. Consider In, the difference in size the -notorist who drives to the national capital is twice as likely to have his car stolen as if he motors to Chicago. These representations come from the United States department of justice. through its bureeu of investigation. The bureau has collected crime statistics from the large cities of the country New York and Fitteburgh excepted. without reported reason for the first nine Intonths of his year Ratio Smaller In city. The government reports 7,725 automobile thefts in Chit go in the first nine months of the ear: but in propertion to the number of cars and the population thatf is a small number. For each 100,000 of population it represents an average stealing of 228.87 automobiles. There are few cities reporting to the government where the ratio Is smaller. In Los Angeles the probability of having -one's automobile stolen is two and a half times that chance in Chicago. In the New York suburb of Newark. there Is nearly three times as much likelihood of flufferingthe loss of a stolen car as in Chicago. The Al Capone has gathered so much momentum in a crime career that he could not stop even if be wished to." And: " Cook county. Illinois, authorities are announced as hopeful for a clean election. They may get a clean cut one, possibly, but a clean one 13 asking almost too much." Mrs. Hoover Starts South to Visit Her Sick Son Washington, D. C., Nov. Mrs. Herbert Hoover, wife of the President, left tonight for Asheville. N. C., to visit her son, Herbert Hoover Jr, who is ilL The son of the President went to Asheville recently to spend the winter after remaining several weeks at the Hoover camp In Virginia. Chicggo Second of Large Cities , in Preventing Thefts ot Autos 6 OPEN SATURDAY NIGHT UNTIL 9 ,O'CLOCK . ?dINNEAPOLIS following table shows the automobiles stolen per 100.000 population. in ,the 17 cities of more than 440.000 which have reported their crime statiatics to the federal government for the flrat nine months of this year: 'Mello pre Auto 100,009 Population. theft. Pool,. Newark 412.0i2 2.770 623.73 Sun nominee 637.S ;I 3.878 077.20 lAra Angeles 1,233.5431 ;0541 37204) Visshindos 480303 2.290 470.35 Minneapolis 464,733 2.000 413.18 St. Louie 822.032 11138 381.03 Bolton ..... 7117.271 2.903 379.02 Cleveland 900,430 3,33 I 300.93 New Orleans. 455.702 1,673 367.03 Detroit 1,333,083 8.373 $63.43 Cincinnati 419,331 1,512 338.50 Milwaukee 572,337 L 1.801 314.53 Baltimore 805733 2.050 , 233.54 fhicato .3,370.3211 7.723 Mat Buffalo 873.070 1.1241 1116.82 Philadelphia 1,931,430 3,002 151.82 Kea. City. Me 309484 415 103.88 A large percentage of the smaller cKles reportingbetween 100,000 and 365,000have more stealing of automobiles in proportion to population than has Chicago. In comparison with Chicago's 228 automobiles stolen per 100.000 population Gary in the same nine months has had 575. Des Moines has had 607. Flint. Mich., has had 316, Fort Worth. Tex., has had 459; Indianapolis. 608. Jacksonville, Fla., 526; Oakland, Cal., 507; Oklahoma City, 650; Omaha. 725; St. Paul, 302; San Antonio, 509; Seat. tie, 615; Birmingham. 520; Columbus. 444, and Denver,. 345. Does Not Consider Visitors. The showing of Chicago in the federal government data is an the more remarkable because of the enormous number of automobiles which travel Into the city daily. Figures are not available to Indicate the number of thefts in comparison v;ith the number of automobiles available to be stolen. but on that basis Chicago probably would make a better showing for safety than when reAoned on population. ROCK ISLAND. ExcrnsioN FARES TO PEORIA. Very low week-end fares to Peoria and return via Rock Island Lines. Coach excursion tickets on sale every Saturday and Sunday during November. Limited to return on any train prior to and including train leaving Peoria 1:00 p. Mondays. Four trains each way daily. Cali or phone City Ticket Office, 179 West Jackson boulevard, Wabash 4600, or Ticket Office. La Salle Streit Station, Wabash 13200.Adv. SUITS AND OVERCOATS , . Tailored in the athletic, manner for young men THE athletic manner, the vigorous strong sturdy lookingmantier ... that's what young men want .,. . and that's just the "forte", the great outstanding 'ability of O.P.G. And this athletic style is needled ill to stay ... slowly, painstakingly, skillfully, by some of the nimblest and most, ble fingers in the tailoring guild ... and the woolens are so rich, so original in pattern, in texture, in color..,. all in all, it's really no , . wonder young want them so Much QUALITY-SERVICE-STYLE-SATISFACTION $50 GGG stilts and overcoats at $50 are an example of , fine quality at ci very low price. The overcoats are on the 6th floor, the suits, on our 4th floor AURICE L ROTHSCHILD Stale at Jackson CHICAGO the r knox derby Knox has made hats for over a hundred years. Shayne has sold them for nearly sixty. That rather guarantees satisfacticn. bIiii e20skave0 .. ' 40 riet' Ats 711'114- .41(N OX A Shol)fir,Ate n, 1 MICHIGAN at RANDOLPH ST. ,l'Aet - -I -J-l------. . . 111 P1L,N,N Ca CA-ILA 3 ' CIIICAGO ST. ,PAT.71. - - - ro), , , H. a hundred m for nearly ; satisfaction. fglYne 1 (en, ANDOLPH , , 't 4 CLOCK I 1 1 111 I ! i:: . . . P , 6 . ?41INNEAP4 tr to stay of the nit guild pattern, it , GGG. s , fine are c i, I i 4 , -' 0- f i: --t t,.k. or-4- 107 i 2.t.' t -i. i r." le t :- 'I , 1 1- arnt.,444,004..,0 a, ,,.,., ' 1 -7,-,---,,-7:--r-----h-v,-- --,,4-. ' P's,, 4 -, I , 4.11.011...."11 eqolo , , ,... i glatiatt 4"4'...."- 1 ---,.Ip Aeu,-; of ...,.. . ; -1 i . 42-ahlb...- .), j r r , ! N.440 i , , k . .7-z4r bloolhb 144 r 1 74' , .,41 L,a44twk , I C - 'N -11 - Aor , , o ) e, q 9 eral weeks at the Hoover camp In 1 or Ticket ()Ince. L.a ba lie street station.' - - t Virginia. Wabash 13200.--Adv- . . . . . .. . . ,m,,,w,.... A...- , ,,,, .,.,,,, , --, ,- , .. , -..-t-,--... -. --1- ,q,'. -- - ----A-- T-0 ---'10,-"00 , '''' ,,,-,''''-.4.' 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