Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on May 4, 1913 · 66
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 66

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Sunday, May 4, 1913
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I :1 1 r I i I 1 114N Cifirago- Tributter me 'WORLD" GREATTST lerwsrArrit TIM TRIBUNE COMPANY. Pt-BUSHER. ' roulTDED :172.-2 10, 1647. IMTERED AS SECOND CLASS MATTER AEG. a. 1406 AT THE ros-roFFIcz AT CHICAGO. ILL.. UNDER ACT OF MARCH I. 1S70. TERMS Of suBsclurnott. CYPDEPS FOR MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS MT:ST BE A CCOMPA-N I ED BY REMITTANCE TO COVER. Postage paid in the United States (outside of Calcago city limits) and In Mexico: Daily. without Sunday, one year $4.00 Daily. without Sandey. six months 2.00 DallY. 'without Sunday. three months Daily, without Sunday, two months 1.00 eithout Sunday. one month .60 Daily. 'kith Sunday. one year 6.0 Daily, with Sunday. six months 8.25 Laily. with Sunday. three months. 2.00 Deily. with Sunday. one month 75 Sunday Issue. one ) ear 260 Sunday Issue. one month 25 Qire postodice address in full. includIng county and !tate. Pemit by exprees money order. draft, or in registered letter. at our rick, to The Tribune company. publueher BY CARRIER IN CITY DISTRICT. Daily 4six days,. per month .50 Daily aml Sunday. per month Sunday only. one month 25 NEW YORK 1207. ct FIFTH AVENUE. CEOISIC BUILDING. WAS11 INGTON-40 wYATT BUILDING. CHICAGoTRIBUNE BUILDING. -Persors wiehirg to take " The Tribune" by carrier may order it by postal card or telephone etmral luti. When delivery is irregular maks complaint. All unsolicited manusnripts, artlnies, letters, and pictures nt to " i he Tribune " are sent at the owner's risk, and The Tribune company expressly repudiatt s any liability or responsibility for their safe custody and return. SWORN CIRCULATION. Net paid circulation of The Chicago Tribune, es reported under oath to the 1 'sited States 0,;, overnm en t tinder aection 167V, of the postal laws and regulations, be:ng the average front Oct. 1, 1012, to March 31, 10131 Daily 245,449 Sunday 363,119 The above figure's are exclusive of all papers which have been wasted, appiled, veturned; duplicated; deny.. ere(' as complimentary, in exchange, RN Ita mpleg; which were missed or lost, or were late in arriving at their destination, or that remain unsold. 'They nine) are exclusive of papers' paid ter, but on whleb '..one- so paha has been rerun led. SINDAY, MAY 4. 1913. AS A REMINDER. The suggestion comes from Newburvport tlatt the Massachusetts representation at the Panama exposition be " the characteristic buildings of a New England village green, a colonial house, a schoolhouse . a town hall, and a vilite church with a heavenward steeple: (Newburyport rlerald.) The expense Would be inconsiderablea reflection ,N-hich does nothing to make it unpopular-- and the " group would he a contrast to the other structures and would be a silent lesson as to the reasons for New England's greatness." To a turkey trotting generation the suggestion. NVithtbUt being as minatory as Isaiah nor as lamentable as Jeremiah, might he the voice of the prophets. LIVING IN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS. Sir William Os lees suggestion that the lock he turned on the day that is gone and the door be not opened on the day that is to come was hnly a bit of counsel to a hurrying generation to observe the day at hand and not jump over it to reachanother nor ignore it in regret for one that had gone. Sir William has a trick of over emphasis, and, to his amusement, it did more than he intended iu the matter of chloroform and utiddle age. Now he has folk hammering nt him because his philosophy would take away both the sunsets and the sunrises and leave the human existence . in the monotony of LiJon. It -would take away the memory that identities alai enriches and the anticipation which bewitches. Therefore, folk protest that they will not lock themselves in a cell of twenty-four hours and have nothing behind them but a door barred across the entrance by which they came and nothing before them except a door barred across the exit by which they will go out. Sir William merely wished to counsel ezainst walking backwards througa the day tl!at is anti against scrambling throdgh it to reach the next. It was not advice to be an Oyster. "A STEP AT A TIME." .;inc out of twelve serious labor disputes la New York, which have arisen in a space of three months, were settled by tbe bureau of mediation and arbitration maintained by the department of labor of that state. This la equal to saying that timely action and tounsel by the state have averted nine strikes. Through mediation by agents of the government the workers have gained sufficient concessions which made the calling of a strike unnecessary or unwise. There are sone in the ranks of labor who are noosed to this " interference " by the ,-;:lvernment into differences between ernployts and employers. They call the small concessions which the states agents gala for the workers through arbitration an4 compromise " a step at a time " reforms. palliatives that remove no real grievances and ID prely pateh up a tetnporary truce. The more sober labor men welcome this tendency of the state government to take a hand in labor disputes and to insist OD W?ace in irdustry wherever peace can be tonorably had. Too many strikes are tolled at t ii col:ntry for trivial rralons. Some. .s-inece taew of diplomacy, lack of ability er willingness on the part of the rei reseutatives of the employs or employete list?n to reason that precipitate a pro-and bitter labor struggle. The " which strikers or employers win through suc't a struggle, precipitated by lack of rettsonableness by both parties,' are not always commensurate with the snffering, privaticn, or expense which the striks has cost either side of the controversy. Llusiness, especially big business, may or may not have reason to complain of governmat interference and prying into its secrets. The working people, on the contrary, have every reason to welcome this quickened government interest in industrial matters. The more the state becomes alive to questions of capital and labor, the more the fortunes of the latter will improve. At least such has been the experience of working people in those countries that are considered most progressive. SUBMIT THE AMENDMENT. The question before the Illinois house of representatives on Tuesday is not " Shall Illinois adopt the Initiative and referendum." It is, " Shall the citizens of Illinois bave the opportunity to declare whether or not they will adopt it." If given this opportunity they may say yes, or they may say no. If they say yes in sufficient numbers it will thereupon become law. If no. they at least will have the satisfaction of deciding for themselves. Nearly half a milHon voters declared that they wished the submission of the initiative and referendum to themselves and their fellow citizens. The Forty-seventh general assembly said them No. Does the Forty-eighth general assembly, or, father, its " popular branch," propose to imitate its predecessor? We believe the house of representatives will not care to assume this responsibility. It would be a very heavy one. If a vote of 450,000 citizens is not to be held to authorize submitting an important change in our political system to the public for adoption or rejection, then let the general assembly proceed at once to get rid of the public policy ballot. If such a vote cannot procure the submission of a question to the people, the public policy ballot is a farce and a fraud. Juggliug with amendments and delay tile tics are equivalent to a denial to the people of the right to pass epon a public question of the gravest public' import. It will be so construed by the public. RETAIN THE COMMERCE COURT. The president, we believe, will do well to hesitate long before be does away with the Commerce court. That tribunal was created for sound reasons which have not been overthrown by its subsequent acts or misfortunes. The incident of Archbald is wholly irrelevant, while if the court interpreted its powers more liberally than its critics believed they should have been, they should seek as remedy not the abolition of the court but amendment of the law creating it. The purpose of the Commerce court is to relieve the general courts of a special Lind of litigation and to bring about a greater degree of harmony in the body of the law dealing with railroads. This is an important purpose and should not be obscured by prejudiced or interested outcry. The fact that more of its first discussion favored the railroads is not surprising, since it is probable the railroads took up their strongest cases. The fact that the Supreme court re versed the Commerce court in most appeals Is not conclusive, since the court is new and Its powers as yet undefined. The Commerce court is an institution which, despite its unfortunate experience thus far, promises useful service. It should be given a longer and fairer trial. IN FEAR OF FOREIGN CULTURE. Another indication of the fear with which Latin America regrrds the dominance of the United States is given in articles by Prof. Vicente Gay of 'Valladolid, in Espana 3Ioderna of Madrid. lie is persuaded that the Latins must guard themselves against the efforts of the North Americans to dominate them intellectually, to substitute English literature for Spanish, to replace Cervantes with Mark Twain. The danger of North American culture supplanting Spanish in the south is represented as great and as demanding extraordinary efforts (rota such patriots as desire to bold the Latin American states to their ova traditions and history. The difference of tongue, Prof. Gay suggests, is a small barrier to the advance of a foreI7n enitnr-, " If we consider the character of the educated classes," Prof. Gay is quoted in the Literary Digest, " we shall perceive that the difference of tongue is a minor obstacle, for every educated person should understand French, English. German, and Italian. If such classes wish to disseminate a particular type of eultute, language is, therefore, no Astacle to the work. Thus the educated people of South America transmit to all the more ignorant classes all the elements of culture derived trom the North American confederation." The defense suggested is, the diffusion of Spanish literature to keep the South American, constantly in touch with intellectual movements in Spain and to bind him by the works of this literature to the traditions of fhe Spanish people. STRONG ABROAD; WEAK AT HOME. Guatemala's request that the United States restrain Great Britain from dunning it with unpleasant menaces for the payment of debts prcbably will be followed by a request from Great Britain that the United States see to it that Guatemala meets its obligations. In such case it is probable that the United States will advise Guatemala to mend its ways and pay its bills, and the advice will have something of the peremptory sound of a command. Naturally. if the United States is to stand between the Central American states and punishment, it assumes dictatorial 1- authority. It happens that there is a demand in England not only that Guatemala pay up but that certain American states cease default1 jog on their obligations. The state most vigorously, censured at thepresent time is Louisiana. The English are protesting indignantly against default on the " baby bonds," and the London Times is their emphatic spokesman. The Times is not at all satisfied with the explanation advanced by the representatives of. Louisiana that the " baby bonds " are not state bonds, but tax warrants. and publishes facsimiles to show that a foreign buyer could not but assume they were bonds backed by the resources, the dignity. and honor of the state, It also recalls with grid awl lap . dignation Instances of default in other states In other than war obligations. The Times suggests that the American government is stern and effective when it undertakes to deal with a delinquent Central American state, but Is singularly Ineffective when its own states give the case of complaint We can send a mandatory word to Guatemala to pay up or take the consequences. One of our own states may do as it likes. If Mexico were prodding a foreign nation with enactments designed to bring that nation down upon it, Mr. Bryan would be tart and emphatic in his advice, and the advice would have the sound of authority. In Sacramento 'Sin Bryan had the good taste not to be as noisy as a man on the bleachers protesting against an umpire's decision, because be knew that his opinion would have no more effect than one from the bleachers, even If it were as loud. When the United States deals with another nation its a government. When it attempts to deal with one of its own states Ws more like a feeble grandfather with unruly grandsons. President Wilson and Secretary Bryan probably will continue to admire state rights as a doctrine, but they are likely to have revised ideas of its applicability. It would not be astonishing if they found a Hamiltonian taint in their philosophy. SOWING THE WIND. A government investigation into the conditions of steel workers in this country, undertaken a few years ago, resulted in the abolitioa of the seven day week by many steel companies. Various plans haee been adopted by these concerns by which none cf their employes is required or permitted to work more than six days a week. But the reform has been only partial. According to the latest report of Commiseioner Neill of the bureau of labor, 15 per eeet of all the employes in the iron and steel industry in this cteintry still work seven days a week. These 15 per cent constitate an army of men running into a score of thousands or more. These men have no Sundays and no day off. They do not go to church, and have no time for amusement. Most of them are immigrants America to them is typified in blast furnaces, in foremen hissing profanity at them, and in hovels where they feed and sleep. In their native land these men have been peasants. Twentieth century enlightenment had not always penetrated into their humble villages. But religion had. On n Sunday they would travel ten arid fifteen miles to a nearby town to attend church. The new world has started them going backward rather than forward. What sense of religion, what simple humanity they possessed is deadened in them by the long hours of toil, with never a days rest, amidst the infernal fires of the steel mills. Sunday work no doubt is a necessity in steel mills. But this does not imply a seven day NS eek. There are scores of other iadustries that are operated on Sunday the bit Me as on week days. But the employes in these industries are not required to forfeit their day of rest. They are given a day off during the week. Moreover, arrangements for eliminating the seven day week have been successfully made by a part, arid perhaps the largest part, of the steel and iron industry. What was possible for half of the employers to do ought to be possible for the rest. To dehumanize the workers in the steel industry by denying them humanity's ancient eight to one day's rest in seven is to add to the nation's slum burdens and problems unnecessarily. A POPULAR pastor of a rich congregation preached a sermon denouncing the tobacco habit and followed .1t up with a sermon on bridge whist. Some preachers are not afraid of anything. ANYHOW, Mr. Bryan has bad a line trip across the country, and no true patriot wilt grudge him that. AFTER the fatigue and worry of moving and getting settled in your new apartments, how can anybody expect you to go to church this morning! ONE of liarvird's eminent professors says baseball is an injurious game on account of the intf nse excitement of watching the close and brilliant play of the skilled athletes. Seasoned fans mill take pleasure in assuring the good professor that the disgust occasioned bY a bonehead " play furnishes a. sufficient reactiun from the " intense excit- ment." IN A MINOR KEY. Mots to Housekeepers. Sme persons have escaped the horrors of moving Into a cheerless and unsatisfactory fat by resorting to suicide, but we hesitate to recommend this method. It is awfully messy and makes a lot of trouble. If the people next door have a mechanical piano and are given to using it at all hours of the day and night. get a dog that howls whenever it hears one. If they kill the dog, buy a musical phonograph and six dozen,ragtime' records, and use them in self-defense whenever necessary. With 15 cents worth of pure grass seed. which you can procure at any grocery or department store, you can raise . dandelions, plantains. emartweed. dogfennel. sheep sorrel, and a dozen other varieties of equally ornamental vegetation right On your front lawn. There are cases on record In h!ch the young man of the second floor flat has married the young woman of the first floor flat, but they are not very numerous. The courtship is full of annoyances and ments. I ilia Uncommunicative Way. " That old uncle of mire." Mrs. Jenner Lee Ondeg0 WitS s3ying. " is the slyest, most Secretive human being I every knew. When he gets a chill he won't shake, and Is hen he had the measles he wouldn't let it break out on hint.' :Nobody Else to Blame. now did Jagway ever happen to fall into the drirk habit?" " lie Tit VOT happened to fall into it at all: he acquired it by peraratext erdeavor." Stilt EKLIbiting: " You may hileve it er not. ma'am." raid Say111011:11 Storey, with his mouth full. "but I wunst took lust prize at a baby show when wuz a little feller." " For being the finest looking baby?" queried the woman of the house, incredulously. No. ma'am; fur beln the best feedeT." " Nell. believe )oul" she rejoined. handing him another plateful. I !lbw. to Keep W611, 00 1 L By DrI1( A.Evans 4t I Questions pertinent to hygiene, sanitation, and prevention of disease, if matters of general interest, will be answered in this column. Where space will not permit or the subject is not suitable, letters will be personally answered, subject to Proper limitations and where a stamped addressed envelope is inclosed. Dr. Evans will not make diagnoses or prescribe for individual diseases. Requests for such service cannot be answered. SPRING CLEANING. sPRING cleaning is a law of nature. As the glow of spring banishes the winter's chill, everything in nature casts off its winter coat, worn and dirty from use, and takes on clean raiment. The Easter bonnet is buts poor response to the great nature call. The trees shed their old, dead parts and new, clean buds break out. The flowers displace the dirty coverings, the dead grass washes away and a bright green carpet covers the earth. Nature cleans in the spring. , Spring cleaning is an instinct. The animals tumble the winter's waste out of their lairs. The birds that, during the winter, bate accumulated dirty coats are seen to spend hours in washing and cleaning their feathers. The old drake that has been contented to look like an ashbox will give up hours to drawing its feathers throu&li its beak, cleaning and oiling them. Spring cleaning is a custom aid always has been. The cave man had the habit of cleaning himself and all about him in the spring time. Back of his custom lay the custotps of his ancestors; back of the customs of tti ancestors lay the instinct of the, animals; lack of this ;ay tile laws of nature. The groups of women who in the spring of 1913 are organizing clean up movements are not illustrations of lie Vries' " Mutations " or " Sports." They are in harmony with the eternal fitness of tbinrs. They ace links in a chain that reaches back to Noah and his ark laws, to Adam, to the cave man, to dumb animals, to nature itself. The beginning is with the house'. Al! winter long the waste has accumulated there. The housewife has done her best. She has cleaned each day, each week, but the task has been too much. The sun had a short day and could not kill all the offensive matter in all the rooms. The air was cold and could not bettallowed to sweep through and do its full share of cleaning. Therefore, each week the standard of household cleanliness -has gone back just a little. It it were 1000 in October. in November it bad fallen by easy stages to 990, and so on, easily and graduaily, it became imperceptibly lower as the winter went on. Now May is here, and, by one prodigious effort, it must be brought to the normal again. The shutters are thrown wide open; the rooms are bathed in sunshine; thOwindows art thrown open; the rooms are bathed in more than that is required to make up for the sins of the winter. So up come the carpets, and out they go to a race ut lot, where some poor fellow beats therm lie stands in a cloud of dust striking away. It is too bad that the principle of vicarious sacrifice should be carried so far. -41P- Statisties show that janitors and eftrpet beaters die from consumption like flies :11 autumn. Though it cannot be shown by statisties, they revel in colds during the spring cleaning season. How could one expect anything else? There they stand, day by day, breathing in the germ laden dust, the dust that the housewife knows she must get rid of if her family is to keep well. The scoffer says: " Hare you not told ns that sunlight and air kill germi; that dry. jug makes harmful things harmless?" Yes, they do. thren a million germs and these agents would kill but 500 of them. The dftnger of carpet beaters' dust. though, lies in the fact that not all janitors die from it, and non s of tItem drops dead as beats. If they did, carpet beating would stop at once. If the babies all died, or if babies died instantly. from bed milk, bad milk would be a matter of no importance to the community. Everybody would stop using it. Cannot a better way be found? -49,- If there is something to be said against the prevailing practice in carpet cleaning, nothing can be said against washing and scouring the walls and floors, the closets and pantries, the sinks and iceboxes. Spring cleaning assumes a rather broad scope. It has for its object lot only cleanliness, but laying plans for proteet ion against disease that comes with the approach of summer. The doors and windows of the avcrage home have usually been kept closed during the cold, bleak daya of the winter. The air in many such homes is more or less foul; dust and dirt have accumulated. The attic and closets have been overworked by the accumulation of useless wearing apparel, old papers, paper boxes, and odds and ends. The ceilings, especially of the closets, have become dust and dirt laden. In smoky neighborhoods, particularly, the naper on the walls is dirty and greasy from coal soot. During the last days of the winter the good housewife and the good husband have planned for a spring cleaning. They have fa el ;I the problem of cost and combined their best judgments in arriving at conclusions as to what shall and what shall not be done. Unfortunately. all of us cannot step to the phone, call the vacuum cleaners to take an order to clean apartment at No. , or home at such a location. While it is the ideal method of cleaning. it is too expensive for most people as yet. This necessitates resorting to soap and water and hard labor by most people. When the wife and husband planned their spring cleaning they were not wholly influenced by selfish motives. They might leave some things undone. They might get along without such extensive cleaning. But their neighbors have rights. They do not want to maintain a menace to the health, comfort, and happiness of their neighbors. Hence they have endeavored to be more liberal in their calculations. There is no better way. no more economical way, no more effective way, to spend money than in maintaining a clean, hygienic home. . ' The best way to clean a house is to begin i with the closets. See that they are thor-oughly cleaned, and put in order .before I anything else is undertaken. Next, empty and clean bureau drawers, take down curtain"; and portieres, clean and put them aside until the cleaning and decorating has been completed. Bric-e-brae and pictures should be cleaned and placed where they will be protected until the carpets and rugs are laid. Housecleaning. as nsually referred to. has regard only for the dusting of pictures, briea-brac, and books, wiping the (lust from the walls. beating the carpets and upholstered furniture and rugs, hanging the mattresses and bedding, etc., In the sun for a few days. However, housecleaning should have for Its object a little more than this.: It should 1 mean getting the house and its immediate surroundings into a hygienic and sanitary condition. Insects are carriers of infection. They are responsible for many epidemic. They Tony carry the germs of typhoid and typhus fever. The mosquito carries the germ of malaria, the bedbug carries the germs of relapsing fever, fleas may carry the germ of many dlioatoi Mho Luaus tha&-Mks goomia. house fly does by carrying disease laden filth on its feet is pretty generally understood. The necessity for thorough spring cleaning seems to be only too apparent. Every corner, every niche should be thoroughly cleaned and freed of vermin. Cockroaches and all fields which offer good breeding places for them should he destroyed. Containers to foods should be provided to bar their entrance. ' These pests may have paid a recent visit to some outhouses, where they cnawled over disease laden feces, only to hastily return to your kitchen and crawl over your bread, cake, and other articles of rood. They are kind and considerate enough to leave the germs of typhoid or typhus fever. Roaches have an especial liking for dark, dirty, damp corners in the kitchen and about the pantry. For this reason extra care should be used when cleaning and repairing in the kitchen and pantry . to provide against the possible invasion of the cockroach. In rural districts the houses may not contaiu o much dirt as the homes in the great cities, but there are outhouses, such as barns, chicken houses, pig pens, cow pens, and stables, smoke houses, and vvagon sheds which need thorough cleaning. In the spring cleaning season they should all be carefully gone over. All the debris and waste which favors the breeding of vermin must be destroyed. - It should not be forgotten that rats, mice, flies, and fleas are especially partial to fields of filth that are located in and about such areas. They are all carriers and spreadcrA of disease, and, if the home is to be free from dise-ase breeding vermin, their 'habitations must be destroyed. - ' It has been known for some time that the mosquito is the carrier of the malarial poison. No disease so insidiously and secret!, undermines the constitution, and decreases physical efficiency as malaria. To do away with the mosquito it is important that cesspools and mosquito breeding habitations be destroyed. Mosquitoes breed in water tanks, tin cans lying about the yard, barnyard, in the street or road, in barrels used to catch rain water, or that for some other reason contain water, and cisterns and flush tanks in toilet rooms. The water tanks, cisterns, and flush tanks should be covered to keep the mosquitoes out; tin cans or other receptacles containing water and lying, about the yard, barnyard, streets, etc., should be gathered up and carted away to the dumps. . To prevent the development of mosquitoes in dumps, the rubbish should be treated with crude petroleum or coal oils. Where sw amps exist within a given radius of a home they should be drained. Where there are filthy cesspools they should eithe: be filled up or treated with some sterilizing agent, as lime. It may be necessary to treat the swamps with crude petroleum or coal oil. If it :s necessary, it should be done. Flies carry disease germs on their feet, gathered from feces, sputa, dead animal matter, and infected diseharges. The germs they deposit oa the food over which they crawl sir the moist surfaees of the body are often the starting point of a serious epidemic of some one of the many contagious and infectious diseases. Spring cleaning then should have regard for placing the home and outhouses in such condition as Nvill reduce the fly breeding places. All garbage cans or containers should be thoroughly cleaned, repaired, and equipped with an appropriate and practical cover. This will make it easier for the housewife or other person who wishes to deposit garbage or other waste material therein a ud insure proper protection of such waste material against exposure to flies. Manure boxes may become a serious menace to public 'health, as they furnish an ideal place for flies to breed. In their construction, therefore, regard should be had for the exclusion of flies, insects, and rats. Manure bins should be carefully cleaned and, in the rural communities, manure piles should be hauled away, as they are often within the field of Rome watershed front whieh the family well may draw some of its water supply. NVIiere it is possible and praetical the Manure boxes, cellars, pig pens, chicken houses, and the inside of outhouses should be whitewashed. Lime should be sprinkled freely about the area. Flies and mosquitoes must especially be guarded against, ith they are the most common carriers arid dispensers of disease producing germs. After the house has been thoroughly cleaned and refuse containers thoroughly sterilized and rendered sanitary, tiles and mosquitoes should be further guardeN1 against by proper screening of the house. Dr. lIosenau has said: " When the matter is generally understood it will be a greater reproach to the housewife to have mosquitoes and flies in the house than bedbugs." SUBSTITUTE BOUGH FOOD. R. B. S. writes:. " Is it injurious for a man of (10 to take from two to three tablespoonfuls of Epsom salts every -day and, if so, why? If from six to thirty grains of acetenilide is taken every week in headache ponders, what effect will it have upon the heart? Should the use of it be discontinued? Does coca cola contain cocaine? If so, in what quantity? Enough to form a habit?" REPLY. 1. Yea Cure your constipation by eating rough food and drinking plenty of water. 2. Acetantlitie taken continuously produces changes in the blood corpuscles. These changes In time produce headaches and certain types of heart disturbance. Its use should be dircontinued. h. It does not contain cocaine. -0 NO EFFECT ON SYSTEM. E. V. M. writes: What effect, if any, would a floating kidney have on one's system? Would it cause extreme nervousness bordering on hysteria? Would it also cause head noise continually? Would you advise an operation and is it a serious one?' - REPLY. 1. None. 2. N. Sometimes people who know they have floating kidneys work themselves into neurasthenia and 113 steria about it. Th trouble with therm is In their heads and not In their kidneys, II and 4. No. NOT INJURIOUS TO HEALTH. N. IL W. writes: Do you conalder. es. torcycle rlding liable to Injure In any way the health of the average person? I hear motorcycles called kidney destroyers. producers of floating kidney. What Is your opdnionir ' L No. 2. Nothing to it. REPLY. -410 BAND MAY 1TELP. D. H. H. writes: " Can a child born, with a rupture be cured without an operation? If so, how?" REPLY. A band well adjusted sometimes helps the ntuaCif P and fascia to cover over the hole. If this result does not follow within two months It will not follow. No other method except operatIon uestP btr - - - - , .,,ok , iEt ermon lot Zobal2o-' " THE' MORAL NEED OF WORK." BY DR. HtrGH BLACK, Union Theological Seminary, New York City. (Who Will Speak at the Sunday Evening Club Tonight.) ' W HEN speaking of the moral duty of labor we are met with a fur- ther theoretical difficulty, which arises chiefly because of the sub division and specialization in all modern industry. Culture, we are assured, is only possible to those who are not dragged into the narrowing condition of being compelled to do a special kind of work. It la true that there is a culture from which the ordinary worker is shut out, the sweetness and light which come from an extended knowledge of literature and art, the refinement of intellect and taste. But that after all is only on the surface of life, the polishing of an instrument. The culture of character and the culture of soul are not confined to any such select class, and indeed moral strength and true wisdom will be found among the unlettered as often as among the highly educated; for character is produced from the ordinary material of life by the common taske and the daily duties. God does not give us character. He gives us only time; he does not give us results, but only opportunities. . -4,-- The yoke of work is not merely a moral preservative, but is also an occasion for growth in gracious life. Faithlessness here not only opens the door to evils we would have avoided, but also deprives us of good. Sloth is one of the seven deadly sins labeled by the church, for it is recognized as one of the great sources of mischief--" the devil's cushion," an old writer calls it, inducing rust of mind and depravity of soul to all who fall victims to it. Its danger lies in what we loae through it, as well as what we suffer. An aimless, useless life brings at the end poverty of soul, with no work of faith and patience of hope and labor of love meeting their harvest and their harvest joy. The slack heads tend to the empty heart, with enough sense of need to desire but nothing to satify. " Have a lust for thine own work and thou shalt be safe." said St. Hernias, and many have been able to add their testimony to the safety given KING GUSTAV'S presence at the consecration of the large new Swedish church in the Rue Guyot rerves to recall the fact that from the time of the repeal of the Edict of Nantes until the great revolution In 1793 only one Protestant church remained In Parisnamely: the chapel of the Swedish embassy. which was attended not only by the Swedish residents In the French capital. but also by French Protestants. Not until 1878 was church distinct from the legation chapel built for the use of the Swedes on the Boulevard Ornano and King Gustav, then crown prince. also preside( at Its consecration. Since then the Swedish colony on the banks of the Seine has grown to such an extent that the new church has been built, the religious portion of the ceremony being performed by the Lutheran bishop of Wisby. The king was accompanied by the grand master of his household, Admiral Frederick de Peyron. who Is married to a great-granddaughter of King William IV. of England. Mme. de Peyron is the daughter of the late Gustav Foucht. fifth Due d'Otrante. by his first wife nee De Donde, her mother having been Lady Augusta Fitzclarence. the daughter of the first Earl eyf Munster, who was the eldest son of Wiliiam IV. and of the ex-actress known as Mrs. Jordan, but who figured In London previous to her association with royalty by the name of Dolly Bland. The late Due dOtrante was a great-grandson of that infamous Fouche who was chief of police to the first Napoleon, but betrayed the latter. as well as everybody else in turn. eventually bringing his life to a fitting close by means of suicide. The present duke, whose title is of French Napoleonic origin, le, like his father before him, a Swedish citizen, is a captain of the Swedish dragoons of the guard, and chamberlain to the queen of Sweden. He is married to Countess Madeleine Douglas of the Swedish branch of the Scotch house of Douglas. Dorothy Nevin. for many years one of the most notable figures in London society and well known in this country through her entertaining and gossipy volumes of reminiscences. has been laid to rept in the family tomb. not of the Nevins,, to whom she W as only allied by marriage, but in that of the Walpole& to whom she belonged by birth. as the daughter of the third Earl, of Orford and sister of the fourth and late earl. In accordance with time honored custom. the hearse containing her remains was driven three times round the church at Ayleham In Norfolk before her body was finally placed In the churchyard. . According to local tradition, Horatio. the second Earl of Orford. detroyed the tomb of the Scalmers, former lords of the manor of Wolterton, which forms part of the parish of Aylsham. In order to make way for the construction of a last resting place of the Walpole& - It is said that one of the unhappy ladies of this Scalmer family haunts the churchyard, always searching for the remains of her relatives, and it is to mollify her restless spirit that this drive of the hearse three times round the churchyard takes place on the occasion of the funeral of every member of the 'Walpole family. --e-- It does not seem, however. that Lady Dorothy' a death was preceded by the apper-rance of the Walpole family banshee at Wolte-toa manor. their principal country seat. This is explained by the circumstance that the banshee Is only seen just prior to the death of the head of the house. or of his consort, and its last apparition is said to have been On the eve of the pudden and unexpected death of the present Earl of Orford's American wife, who was Miss Louise Corbin. daughter of D. C. Corbin of New York. The banshee takes the form of a spectral coach and four, and is believed In by all the peasantry of the district. A number of them profess to have seen it. and one id man who was paesing the principal entrance of Wolterton park on the night before the death of the late Earl of Orford in 1894 still relates with dramatic detail how he saw the coach PANAMA CANAL StPPLIES FROM GERMANY,. Chicago. April 26.f Edttor of The Tribune j The " nerve " of some American manuftcturers to bid on gweerninent our-pile& specially in a case where they think that they htve. no competition, seems to beat everything- Preoldent Wilson was wise in putting into afoot & law that bad become & dead letter, which la that American articiee should be used in the construction of the Panama canal 111314,4 I i n the Judgment of the, president bide or tenders should appear to .be extortionate or unreasonaNe. He gave a firm In Germany the contract for the construction of two floating cranes for uoein the Panama canal instead of giving this contract to a Cleveland concern whose bid was $600,000 higher than the German firm's. and beside, ULM VI foreign bouat agreestatunVolxtaless by a love of work. When accepted al part of the moral law it does much more than offer safety from temptation; for it brings new sanctions and a new motive. -0-- Industry from this point of view be. comes just another name for conscience. Without this moral sense we to easily fritter away our strength and squander our time, and have nothing left for oar work but the dregs of power. Conscience has been abused by being limited to speculative difficulties about right and wrong, the settling of questions of casuistry. It too often bas lost its re. lotion to actual and common life. Ws need more conscience put into Our daily work, and in this connection conscience le simply industry. Some men of delicate. refined conscience in matters of abstrect morality are traitors to it in their every. day work. If we are not making our work a disci,. pline far our character, if it has no moral contents to us, our diligence will be barrel of real fruit. The true nobility of lift Is honest, earnest service, the strenuous ex ercise of our faculties. with conscience la our work as in the sight of God who gins us our place and our tools and our work. By permission Fleming H. Revell company.: BIOGRAPHY. Dr. Hugh Black, professor of practical theeion, rnlon Theological seminary. New 'York City. wee born at Rothesay. Buteshire. Scotland. in 19018. He was educated at Rothesay academy. Gleam, university. and the Free Church college. Gitegoop The degree of D. D. has been conferred on him by Yale, Princeton, and Glasgow universities. ht 1E41 be was ordained and took charge of the Sherwood church, Paisley. Scotland, later going to et., George's rotted Free church at Edinburgh. se accepted the chair of practical theology in rataa seminary in 1906 and has continued in that poeitioe since. Be is equally noted as preacher anti writer. Among the dozen volumes that have come freak me pen the following probably ere best knewita Friendship," " The Dream of Youth." cot., tore and Restraint," Work." The Gift et De. fluence." " Comfort," " The Practice of Self. Culture." and " Christ's Service of Love." Dr, Black has served as college preacher " at nearly all of the prominent educational Institutions of the United States. LA MARQUISE DE FONTENOY. - I Coo right: 1S13, By the Brentwood Com racy. turn and pass rlght through the Iron gates Just as If they offered no obstacle at all." Wolterton park. where Oliver Cromwel was often a visitor. is full of treasures, among the most curious of which is the key of the great Stamboul mosque of St. Sophia. In the days when it was still a place of Chris. tian worship; a manuscript letter from George II. to the fIrst Lord Orford, concluding, " God bless you! G. R."; the spurs worn by King William IlL at the battle'of the Boyne, Garrick's watch, given him by Le Horace Walpole, and the silver Inkstand used throughout the greater part of his Do-. Iltical career by Sir Robert Walpole, whs . while still a commoner, was created a Knlgtt of the Garter. It may not be amiss in this connection vs recall the fact that a daughter of the house of Walpole came near becoming queen of England in the eighteenth century. At the time when the royal Duke of Gloucester" married the Illegitimate daughter of litr Edward Walpole his elder brother. George had but recently succeeded to the throne and had but two small babies, George. afterA wards George IV.. and Frederick. Duke of York. Their lives alone at that moment stool between the Duke of Gloucester and the throne. and falling them had anything hap. pened to George 111. the Duke of Gloucester would have become ruler of Great Britain, and his illegitimately born wife. the natural daughter of Sir Edward Walpole. by the postmaster of Darlington's daughter. IrOtta have become queen of Great Britain, Soot. land. and Ireland. The romance may be said to have Una when Edward Walpole, second on of the first Earl of Orford, premier of George Land George II.. took lodgings in London over the shop of a tailor, at the bottom of Pall Mall, where was apprenticed a beautiful girl named Clement, daughter of the postmasew of Darlington Between the gay and handsome man of the world and the pretty apprentice a friendship was developed which led Walpole to move to a house at the top of Pall Mall, and the Darlington postmaster to hasten to London. Intent upon taking his daughter back with him to his home. She professed penitence and went to pack her box. Instead of doing so. however, she popped out of the house. ran up to Edward Walpole's residence, took the head of Ms table, and never again relinquished her poeCon. The first Lord Orford threatened that It hie son married her he would beggar him. And so the couple remained unwedded, hop. log to outlive the terrible father. Edward received a knighthood and thesis. retary-ship of Ireland. Three girls werebern and then the mother died, still unwedded. One of them married Lord Albemaritin brother. the Hon. Frederick Keppel, bishop of Exeter; another married the fifth Uri Dysart. while the third, after a first union , with the Earl Waldegrave, who was eerd ried off by smallpox. gave her hand to the royal Duke of Gloucester. In those days the so-called royal marrieds law had not been enacted. and her unieb4 with the duke was so perfectly valid In evert', sense of the word that she was allowed te! share her husband's honors and prerogstfree as well as his royal status. while the three children whom she bore the dukenamidift William Frederick. second Duke of Olette cester; Sophia. and Carolineranked as tulle fledged princes and princesses of the rela'. Ing house of Great Britain. In fact, the sonnamely: the second Dubs of Gloucesterwas considered as of matches' rank to marry his first cousin, Princess Marii one of the daughters of King George III. ' The first Duke of Gloucester, that integer. George M.'s brother, died a little over led years ago, followed two years later to the grave by his duchess. Queen Victoria via devoted to their children and In her pubd lished diaries many affectionate references are found to her aunt, wife of the second ' Duke of Gloucester. who died in 15:57. to her cousin. Princess Sophia, who died Mt married in 1844. two floating cranes 100 dare earlier Oak the American firm could. These two large floating cranes. which ell be ono of the greatest eights at the Panam canal 'when finished. aril pieces ot machine,' not known in this country at all. They sr of the revolving type and can, be used secs' rately or together. They produce their Owl electric power and are capable of lifting 600,0(0 lb.. Their height can be comPareS to a twenty story building and each lel have a boom with an outreach of eighirtv. feet. I am under the impression that Col. Gov' theist could have constructed the Panama canal a t less than half its present cost 'taw President Roosevelt wtkuld have done Irts,t President Wilscn is now doing, that is let the American manufacturers " hold at" Uncle Sam. The immense profits went to the manufacturers, and very little did the web. -Bleu get - - - CO)IRAD GLOM. j tf loaf for tbt Mrs:: bine a a '0151.1 east , 111,0'1 Pa rant proxe , ',eke Mio oes their .1 to thse, weCt. mr. MC t rte. -st club ( take they tIr4,ve. their Mr, latter metar! at 510 Mr. avow their Mr. Chic& Barbs pittai Mr. col() borne range Churl Mr. I :, I Zile CifiCI N Me UORLD, ' ti a Tint TRIBUNE CC 4 "------E0171TDErt ',, .1 --- 1M-rIERED AS SECO! '.11 a. 1406. AT THE PC 3. ILL.. 'UNDER ACT ; - TERMS Of A IDFDEFS FOR MAU BE A CCOMFA.N I ED 1 q COVER. t Eit Postage paid in tho 11 Calcalgo city limits) a 'i Daily. without Sunda: ...: . Daily. without Sandey 'Oa It Cifirago- r- E I 'Tribune, e on f twhoerkcionngtrapryeo,phlea vine fdeignetiavtie own hinenstaitsucesowont dateaftaeusitglinvooththeer setnafites4s . Inly- - ..- 7 N very reason to welcome this quickened LOT- In other than war obligations. lesessa ral me IVORLD, GICATEST NrwsrArrit ernment Interest in industrial matters. The - The Times suggests that the American 'Mr .77' ow- to Keep Well. 0 El ermon to 'Cob al2.:: , c , a A . E H 1 HE RIBU COMPAY. PUB TNE NLISHER. more the state becomes aliye to questions government is stern and effective when it it,,T.. .. of capital and labor, the more the fortunes undertakes to deal with a delinquent Cen- .'111 .142 L T By Van S I I , "THE MORAL NEED OF WORK" , .1. - ' 4 romrDEro ru----z to, lite. of the latter will improve. At least such has tral American state, but Is singularly !net- Dr. WA . BY DR. HeGH BLACK, Union Theological Seminary, New York City. . :.:(t-: "lbeen e wtc'h rkelexperience nt le Ie' .1 Questions pertinent to hygiene, sanitation, and prevention of disease, if matters (Who Will Speak at the Sunday Evening Club Tonight.) of general interest, will be answered in this column. Where space will not permit. or it IM-TERED AS SECOND CLASS MATTER AUG. those countries that are considered most of complaint HEN speaking of the moral duty by a love of work. When accepted al e. we. AT THE PoSTOFFICE AT CHICAGO, progressive. We can send a mandatory word to Guate- the subject is not suitable, letters will be personally answered, subject to Proper isms- L left ftucthoiloQ: raiment. The Easter bonnet is but a poor 11 . .... IL.. 'UNDER ACT OF MARCH 11, 1S70.... . ' tations and where a stamped addressed envelope is inclosed. Dr. Evans will not make mala to pay up or take the consequences. of labor we am met with a fur- part of the moral law it dogewe s diagnoses or prescribe for individual diseases. Requests for such service cannot be I . SUBMIT THE AMENDMENT. W , . ' One of our own states may do as it likes. answered. ' ther theoretical difficulty, which than offer safety from temptation; for is. -i TERMS Of suBsclurnotr. The question before the Illinois house of arises chiefly because of the sub- brings new sanctions and a new mons- " In 11. , If Mexico were prodd- g a foreign nation SPRING CLEANING. house fly does by carrying disease laden filth division and specialization in all 1 COVER. Illinois adopt the initiative and referendum." tion down upon it, Mr. Bryan would be tart Tee:, nt nothing , VEDEES FOR MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS MrST representatives on Tuesday is not " Shall with enactments designed to bring that na- Industry F- EE ACcOMPANIED BY REMITTANCE TO PRING cleaning is a law of nature. modern industry. Culture, we are assured, A on its feet is geinerally understood. e thorough spring cleaning is only possible to those who are not comes just another name for - t ii Pota , s. eorisne.nt -.4.1r a i., sge paid in the 'United States (outsid e of It is, " Shall the citizens of Illinois bave the and emphatic in his advice, and the advice As the glow of spring banishes the Th necessity for seems to be only too apparent. very co 1 I winter's chill, everything in nature so ease, Calcago city limits) and In Mexico: ner, every niche should be thoroughly dragged into the narrowing condition of our being compelled to do a special kind of fritter away our strength and equander-. tee el' $4 00 opportunity to declare whether or not they would have the sound of authority. In Sac- casts off its winter coat, worn and for Ol . t Daily. w ithout Sunday, one year cleaned and freed of vermin. fr'amMhaortha is work. Daily. without Sandey. six months 2 00 Will adopt it." ramento Mr. Bryan had the good taste not dirty front use, and takes on clean Cockroaches and all fields which offer Vrs.-. .;,i .. ! Daily. 'without Sunday. three months i . Daily, without Sunday, two months 1. I.00 If given this opportunity they may say to be as noisy as a man on the bleachers response to the great nature call. The trees good breeding places for them should be It le true that there is a culture from work dhraesgshoefenpoe a which the ordinary worker is shut out, the abused by ennr e bine a -4511 Daly ithout Sunday. one month .60 shed their old, dead parts and new, clean destroyed. Containers to foods should be 1 i. e Daily. with Sunday. one year 8 50 yes, or they may say no. If they say yes protesting against an umpire's decision, be- provided to bar their entrance. sweetness and light which come from an limited to speculative difficulties aboict extended knowledge of literature and art, right and wrong, the settling of question, eget- - mr. - a'. cause he knew that his opinion would have buds break outs The flowers displace the These pests may have paid a recent visit the refinement of intellect and taste. But of casuistry. It too often bas lest its tres- s r Daily, S ith Sunday. six months, 8.25 in sufficient numbers it will thereupon be- dirty coverings, the dead grass washes away no more effect than one from the bleachers, ea ye' 1 ZOO to some outhouses, wItere they cnawled over I e- Dally, with Sunday. three months come law. If no, they at least will have the and a bright green carpet covers the earth. that after all is only on the surface of life, lation to actual and common life. te . se en eces, only to hastily return eeren,t, Daly, w ith Sunday. one month .75 even if it were as loud. . Nature cleans in the spring. disease lad f the polishing of an instrument. The cul- need more conscience put into our d ?is i': 1 ti,y lessee, to your kitchen and crawl over your bread, ture of character and the culture of soul work, and in this connection consciente le o ,, , Sunday issue, one ) ear 2 80 satisfaction of deciding for themselves. When the United States deals with an- --e-- , ISunday issue. one month 25 Nearly half a milHon voters declared that Spring cleaning is an instinct The an!- cake, and other articles of rood. They are are not confined to any such select class, simply industry. Some men of delicate, to ke . , other nation its a government. When it Willi 43ive postedice address in full, including county kind and considerate enough to leave t e , 1 teals tumble the winter's waste out of their and indeed moral strength and true wis- refined conscience in matters of abstr ect and !tate. they wished the submission of the initiative attempts to deal with one of its own states rem of typhoid or typhus fever. Messes lairs. The birds that, during the winter, - Roaches dom will be found among the unlettered morality are traitors to it in their every. -, - Ile mit by express money order. draft, or in reels- oaches have an especial liking for dark, their -1 - I and referendum to themselves and their fel- it-a more like a feeble grandfather with un- have accutnulated dirty coats are seen to ' as often as among the highly educated; day work. to the .1., , erect letter. at our rick, to The Tribune company. dirty, damp corners in the kitchen and about publisher. low citizens. ruly grandsons. spend hours in washing and cleaning their for character is produced from the or- If we are not making our work a disce seselel e pantry. For this 'reason extra care dinary material of life by the common pline for our character, if it has no - President Wilson and Secretary Bryan feathers. The old drake that has been con- m , ond ner. 1 should be used when cleaning and repair- taske and the daily duties. God does not contents to us, our diligence will be bane BY CARRIER IN CITY DISTRICT. The Forty-seventh general assembly said tented to look like an ashbox will give up !z.' Daily 4.ix days). per month I .8'3 them No. probably will continue to admire state lug in the kitchen and pantry to provide give us character. He gives us only time; of real fruit. The true nobility of lifs is . y,:torth- hours to drawing its feathers throueli its e Daily and Sunday. per menth .55 against the possible invasion of the cock- he does not give us results, but only op- honest, earnest , (laugh rights as a doctrine, but they are likely to -1, Sunday only. one month .25 Does the Forty-eighth general assembly, beak, cleaning and oiling them. roach. eorucris:,00lift ()Lir WV ' portunities. I i-r or, father, its " popular branch," propose to :Spring cleaning is a custom tied always .4. esweoytioarnireteittny. carrier may order It by postal or telephone of 450,000 citizens is not to be held to author- lonee Mr. t .! .. ' NEW YOEK 1207. Q FIFTH aveNuEs imitate its predecessor? have revised ideas of its applicability. It ' would not be astonishing if they found a has been. The cave man had the habit In rural districts the houses may not con- it -41- our work. rte.. -st Ckit.isic Ersii,r,ING. of cleaning himself and all about him in the The yoke of work is not merely a moral us our place and our tools and . club Hamiltonian taint in their philosophy. tams SO much dirt as the homes in the great t . We believe the house of representatives preservative, but is also an occasion for WASHINiTt)N-40 WYATT BUILDING. spring time. Back of his custom lay the , cities, but there are outhouses, such as barns, By permission Fleming H. Revell company.: tak! r CHICAGoTill BUN E BUILDING. will not care to assume this responsibility. custosus of his ancestors; back of the customs growth in gracious life. Faithlessness here BIOGRAPHY. t 1 chicken houses, pig pens, cow pens, and SOWING THE WIND. AHY. l-ee If would be a very heavy one. If a vote of tli ancestors lay the instinct of the, anis stables, smoke houses, and wagon shede not only opens the door to evils we would Mr. -Permit's wiehirg to take " The Tribune" by A government investigation into the cone mals; tack of this ;ay tile laws of nature. have avoided, but also deprives us of good. Dr. Hugh Black, professor of practical theeegy ?- seminary. u th e s i. r a N. :. c which need thorough cleaning. btonrnionatThReootlohgelsacaTi. B erne. - , Cen;ral I,,'). When delivery is irregular make ize submitting an important change in our The groups of women who in the spring In the spring cleaning iteason they should Sloth is one of the seven deadly sins la-- their complaint. ditions of eteel workers in this country, un- dertaken a few years ago, resulted in the of 1913 are organizing clean up movements all be carefully gone over. All the debris . beled by the church, for it is recognized as He was educated at Rothesay academy. Ols, toths- political system to the public for adoption are not illustrations of De Vries' " elute- and waste which favors the breeding of one of the great sources of mischief" the university. and the Free Church college. Glastec Mr.,, , All unsolicited manuscripts, artiles, letters, and c P . , devil's cushion," an old writer calls it, The degree of D. D. has been conferred on him by abolition of thee seven day week by many tions or Sports." They are in harmony vermin must be destroyed. 'latter I '. pictures cent to " "I he Tribune are sent at the or rejection, then let the general assembly With the eternal fitness of Mines. They ace - inducing rust of mind and depravity of Yale, Princeton. and Glasgow universities. ra owner's risk, and The Tribune company expressly proceed at once to get rid of the public policy steel companies. Various plans have been, It should not be forgotten that rats mice taseurr links in a chain that reaches back to Noah , an fleas are especially partial to fields' flies d fl " soul to all who fall victims to it. Its 1601. he was ordained and took charge of the Sher at 51Z repudiat, s any liability or responsibility for their , , i, wood church, Paisley. Scotland, later going to et, ballot. If such a vote cannot procure the adopted by these concerns by which none cf and his ark laws to Adam to the cave nen danger lies in what we lose through it, es George,. ; ..- safe cuody and return. of filth that are located in and about such United Free church at Edinburgh. with. Se Ir. If ' submission of a questic;n to the people, the their employes is required or permitted to to dumb animals, to nature itself. areas. They are all carriers and spreaderA well as what we suffer. accepted the chair of practical theology In owes avenu K s An aimless. useless life brings at the seminary in 1908 and has continued in that posit's r r SWORN CIRCULATION. public policy ballot is a farce and a fraud. work more than six days a week. -re- of disease, and, if the home is to be free , nd poverty of soul, with no -work of faith since. He is equally noted as preacherand writ heir er. t ' Net paid circulation of The Chicago Juggling with amendments and delay Mee But the reform has been only partial. Ac- The beginning le with the house. Al! All front disease breeding vermin, their habita- and patience of hope and labor of love Among the dozen volumes that have come freak Tri bra ne an reported under oath to winter long the waste has accumulated there. tions must be destroyed. Mr. 1 7. the IL pited States overnment tinder tics are equivalent to a denial to the people , he ...... , meeting their harvest and their harvest his pen the following probably are best knewns Chic& Friendship," " The Dream of Youth." te cs)., " joy. The slack heads tend to the empty of the right to pas tepon a public question - cording to the latest report of Commiseioner The housewife has done her best. he h cleaned each day, each week, but the task It has been known for some time that the Barba acetion 167V, of the postal laws and Neill of the bureau of labor, 15 per cent of all tore and Restraint," Work.' " The Gift et fa. heart, with enough sense of need to desire patei !r-- the gravest publii-e 7 import. It will be so has been too much. The sun had a short mosquito is the carrier of the malarial poi- fluence." " Comfort," The Practice of Self. t' -11 regulations, be:rog the average front of the employes in the iron and steel industry . but nothing to satisfy. " Have a lust for s 4 - - Oct. 1, 1012, to March 31, 10131 construed by the public. e . ter in all the rooms. The air was cold and uuder day and could not kill all the offensive mat- bun. No disease so insidiously and seeretly thine own work and thou shalt be safe." Culture. and " Christ's Service of Love." Dr Black has served as - college preacher " at sews' , Daily 245449 in this c ,ountry still work .seven days a weesmines the constitution, and decreases bable could not besalloweel to sweep through and physical efficiency as malaria. said St. Hermas, and many have been aall of the prominent educational Institutions of cola l . , borne sander 303,119 RETAIN THE COMMERCE COURT. do its full share of cleaning. To do away with the mosquito it is im- the United States. r ange I 1 . The sident w believe, ill d Therefore, each week the standard of portant that cesspools and mosquito breed- C These 15 per cent constitate an army amen .to add their testimony to the safety given e p, e e, will well to running into a score of thousands or more. 4 The above figures are exclusive of heri Mr. , ! all Paper ISlateh slave been wanted, hesitate long before be does away with the These men have no Sundays and no day off. household cleanliness ha.; gone back just a ing habitations be destroyed. Mosquitoes little. If it were 1000 in October. in No- breed in water tanks, tin cans lying about LA MARQUISE DE FONTENOY. - 1 spoiled, vet aimed; (I optics' ted ; deity. Commerce court. That tribunal was created vember it bad fallen by easy stages to let0, the yard, barnyard, in the street or road, in sense of view b.. ere(' as complimentary, in exchange, They do not go to Miura, and have no time , . for sound reasons which have not been over- for amusement. Most of them are immi- s , an Ita in pleg; which were m lased or and so on, easily and graduaily, it became barrels used to catch rain water, or that r. s ,, . thrown b Its subsequent acts America t theta i tpifie y q o msr grants merca o s yd in blast imperceptibly lower as the witr t n s e ue wen o. ' ,- Inert, or 'acre late in arriving at their th for some other reason contain water, and Copyright: '1S13, By till. Brentwood Company.: . ,,, destination, or that remain unsold. tunes. The incident of Archbald is wholly furnaces, in foremen hissing profanity at Now May is here, and, by one prodigious cisterns and flush tanks in toilet rooms. KING GUSTAV'S presence at the conse- turn and pass right through the iron gates s k , s s. -, 'They also are exclunive of papers' paid irrelevant, while if the court inter - interpreted its them, and in hovels , m sere they feed and d effort, it untst be brought to the normal The water tanks, cisterns, and flush tanks cration of the large new Swedish Just as if they offered no obstacle at all." . ter, hat on vshieh snowier so pal. has again. should be covered to keep the mosquitoes church in the Rue Guyot serves to re- --0-- 1" been reran led. powers more liberally than its critics be- sleep. The shutters are thrown wide open; the out; tin cans or other receptacles containing call the fact that from the time of the Wolterton park. where Oliver Cromwel . - tiered they should have been, they should In their native land these men have been rooms are bathed in sunshine; thOwladoevs water and lying, about the yard, barnyard, repeal of the Edict of Nantes until was often a visitor. is full of treasures, i , .. r SI.NDAY, 'MAY 4. 1913. seek as remedy not the abolition of the court peasants. Twentieth century enlightenment art thrown open; the rooms are bathed in streets, etc, should be gathered up arid the great revolution In 1793 only one Protes- among the most curious, of which is the key i , 1, air. but amendment of the law creating it. bail not always penetrated into their humbl carted away to the dumps. , tant church remained In Paris-namely: the of the great Stamboul mosque of St. Sophlte 1, . . e - .;-- P I -- The purpose of the Commerce court Is to villages. But religion had. On a Sunday However, more than that is required to To prevent the development of mosquitoes chapel of the Swedish embassy, which was In the days when it was still a place of Chris- 11 AS A REMINDER. make u for the sins of the winter. So u s p in duui r I , the rubbish should be treated with not only b th atten e n t y a the Swedish residents tian worship; a manuscript letter from ... ' relieve the general courts of a special Lind they would travel ten arid fifteen miles to a come the carpets, and out they go to a recant crude petroleum or coal oils. in the French capital, but also by French George II. to he first g t t Lord Orford, conclud- King lrlr-illelk Vat t the Massachusetts repreentation at the of litigation and to bring about a greater nearby town to attend church. The new lot, where some poor fellow beats therm Where se amps exist within a given raditie Protestants. itme vIa lI tch a .t g the iven bahtthnic ha y this; I I, 1 1 11 The suggestion comes front Newburvport trig. " God bless you! G. R."; the spurs wo W rn ; s B , ;A - Ile stands in a cloud of dust striking away. of a home they should be drained. h b) o'y Knein Where Not until 1S78 was a church distinct from degree of harmony in the body of the law world has started them going backward i kr Panama exposition be " the characteristic It is too bad that the principle of vicarious there are filthy cesspools they should eithes the legation chapel built for the use of the a ..- t dealing with railroads. This is an impor- rather than forward. What sense of re- career a e crom by m- oSn Sir er. Robert w aaer Weateeldeeslein we stits that more of its first discussion favored the toil, with never a day- sacrifice should be carried so far. be filled up or treated with some sterilizing Swedes on the Boulevard Ornano and King Horace Walpole. and the silver inkstand colonial house, a schoolhouse. a town hall, . , ' buildings of a New England village green, a tant purpose and should not be obscured,by ligion, what simple humanity they possessed -4. agent, as lime. Gustav, then crown prince. also presideti. at used throughout the greater part of bis Pee' lit! cilae still l re prejudiced or interested outcry. The fact is deadened in them by the lotug hours of Statistics show that janitors and carpet It niav be necessary to treat the swamps its consecration. Since then the Swedish and a white church with a heavenward beaters die front coneumption like flies :a - With crude petroleum or coal oil. If it :s colony on the banks of the Seine has grown while s rest, amidst the iu- beate . of the Garter. . t steeple." (Newburyport rierald.) The ex- autumn. Though it cannot be shown by necessary, it should be done. s railroad , not surprising, since it is prole fernal fires of the steel mills. 1 bisboP of WibYto such an extent that the new church boa mony being performed by the Lutheran may not be amiss in this connectiot pense Al Mild be inconsiderabla reflection s is It n ie statieties, they revel in colds during the -4.-- ' been built, the religious portion of the core- e spring cleaning season. How could one ex- recall the fact that a daughter of the hots. ,'44 t Sunday work no doubt is a necessity in Flies carry disease germs on their feet, i ,; 3 'N filch does nothing to make it unpopular-- able the railroads took lip their strone s of Walpole came near becoming queen of , - s ss ems es, et- s ,es. es-- .ass steel mills. But this does not imply a seven peet anything else? There they stand, day gathered from feces, ,.pura, dead animal a. . r'r, cri a rse4 11, has 414101442,01 ..b. 44 4 , lip.1 I t , ll II 1 , , , 1 . i 1 - I 1 .., : 4 . , I . . , I , i ,. ...., -, , , , , , , , , 3 ! :: ''' 1 1 . : t e i , '' . ' 1 I - 4 t ,,311 -:., 1 .,' i ' .,. , . . - ' 5' '..: I: rel i. , . 4 ;, 1 , ',' , 1 : k . , , - ; 4- ". 1 i - r : . , p J i ' e 4 (k, , , 4 ,..' 4 4, i t T 1' f, J . - t .,:, ' : , , . ; r 4 ' . VILE. THE CHICAGO SITNDAY TRIBUNE: MAY 4. 1913.

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