Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on November 10, 1934 · 10
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 10

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Saturday, November 10, 1934
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10
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10 COOKING SCHOOL CLOSES SESSIONS FOR SOUTH SIDE ReopensTuesday for West Side Homemakers. fly KATHERINE KELLEY. ' South side women had their last day yesterday at THE TRIBUNE cooking school conducted this week in the Trianon ballroom at 6201 Cottage Grove avenue. Not only was there a holiday atmosphere of music, speeches, and surprising new recipes, but also the awarding of the grand prizes. always a feature of the last day oZ each week of the school. Next Tuesday at 12:30 p. m. the huff, black, and apricot kitchen with its shining white cabinets, ranges, and modernistic metal tables, will be at home on the stage of Guyon's Paradise ballroom, 128 North Pulaski road. and Mrs. Ida M. Chitwood, home economics expert, will welcome her second group of pupilsthe west side homemakers. On Nov. 20 the school will be moved to the Aragon ballroom for the convenience of north side Women. Ballroom Filled to Capacity. As in the three previous days of the south side cooking school, women eager for new culinary secrets were on hand at the Trianon long before the doors were officially opened at 10:30 a. rn. By noon the ballroom was tilled, and to conform to fire regulations, no others were allowed to enter. Inside the packed ballroom were heard 5,000 or more voices which, during three days of practice. had become expert in harmonizing the old favorites during the community singing hour led by George A. Carlson, with Cathryne Bennett at the piano. Then followed merrymaking with Romo Vincent. Stan Myers and his Morrison hotel orchestra glee club. Invited to Inter Conference. Bob Elson, W-G-N announcer, gave the women some pointers on how he covers sports, particularly baseball. Kathleen McLaughlin, TRIBUNE woman's editor. in a short talk issued a formal invitation to all women to attend THE TaintINE's second annual conference on current problems which Is to be held on Feb. 26 and 27 in the Palmer house. Other entertainment included novelty dance numbers by the pupils of Ermie Schultz school of dancing, Berenice Taylor, soprano of the W-G-N staf; Sara Corinne Mason, soprano, selected as the best woman singer in the 1934 Chicago land music festival, and Stanley Rimkus, basso. There was also a duet by Phil Maxwell, master of ceremonies, and Mrs. Maxwell. Tables Turned on Miss Meade. Ordinarily Mary Meade, TRIBUNE cooking editor, introduces Mrs. Chit-wood at the lecture period, but this time the tables were turned. Mrs. Chitwood introduced Miss Meade to the ballroom full of women who follow Miss Meade's recipes day after day throughout the year. Miss Meade had picked out her most recent original dishes, ham loaf with minted pears, corned beef hash slices, and creole fruit compote. She was particularly proud of the minted pears served with the ham loaf. She cooked orange slices, placed on them baked pear halves mounted with cream cheese and mint jelly and garnished With cherries. Mrs. Janes Wins First Prize. Mrs. Charles Janes, 8419 Loomis street, who has been married 30 years and whose husband is a taxi driver, was awarded the first grand prize, a $207.50 Norge refrigerator. Other awards were as follows: SECOND PRIZEVanity gas range, Mrs. F. L. Self, 4504 Drexel boulevard. THIRD PRIZEFood mixer, Mrs. George Maeltel. 7417 May street. FOURTH PRIZEElectric hostess tray. Minnie Marie Hankes, 9352 South May street. FIFTH PRIZEAluminium matched set, Mrs. Dwight Morgan, 6340 Blackstone aye-slue. SIXTH PRIZEAluminium double roaster, Mrs. Stella Hammen, .6724 Stony Island avenue.. SEVENTH PRIZEElectric coffee maker, Mrs. R. E. Harlow, 7443 Clyde avenue. Mrs. Janes, winner of the grand prize, attended the Tuesday afternoon session but was unable to gain entrance Thursday. She has been going to Tribune cooking schools for four years. When informed by telephone that she had won the refrigerator she was overcome with joy and could not speak. ANTI-WAR PARADE IS STAGED BY 500 STUDENTS IN N. Y. 1 New York, Nov. 9.---SpecialiFive bundred students of the city's colleges and high schools, about half of whom were young girls, held an anti-war demonstration and parade through the midtown section tonight. Most of those who participated in the protest were members of the National Students' League for Industrial Democracy and pther similar groups. Bearing bannerS and placards on Which were inscribed such slogans as " Smash Militarism," " Abolish the It O. T. C.," " StudentsFight Imperialist War," and " We Want Books Not Guns," the students assembled at the south end of Columbus circle. There they were addressed by James Wechsler, editor of the Columbia Spectator, and others who were introduced as students from C. C. N. Y., New York university, and Brooklyn college. GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY "The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want."Psalms xxiii, 1. INDEPENDENT. TOMORROW-SUNDAY. "Old Songs of the Church." WMAQ. IFC. 10 A. M. 9 P. M. With HOMER RODEHEAVER Former Billy Sunday Song Leader.) WILL ROGERS SAYS: "Rody Is the fellow who can make you alLIF whether you want to or not." enjoy broadcast more write either etation for free copy of "Rody's" Hymn Book. Chicago Ethical Society STUDEBAKER THEATER, SUNDAY. NOV. 11, 11 A. M. DR. HORACE J. BRIDGES, "The Gathering War Clouds" IARMISTICE DAY ADDRESS. CENTRAL CHURCH, orchestra Hall. 216 S. Miebirrar-av. REV. FREDERICK P. SHANNON. EMU:10.y Morning. at Eleven. Pk Sample ,Cogking of fEitirt Roma Vincent, comedian (center), and Stan Myers, orchestra leader at the Terrace Gardens. sampling chicken cooked by Mrs. Ida M. Chit-wood at the Tribune Cooking school in the Trianon ballroom. tTIIIBtTICE Photo. BORAH DEMANDS RELIEF WASTES BE INVESTIGATED Calls Expenditures by U. S. Appalling. Washington, D. C., Nov- 9.--Special.--An investigation either by congress or the executive of the " shameless waste " in the handling .of relief funds was demanded by Senator William E. Borah Rep., Idaho on his return to Washington today. Senator Borah ' inferred, .as many Republican orators have charged, that relief funds were distributed during the campaign for political purposes. " There is one thing about this matter of expenditures for relief that must have attention either from congress or the executive department," the senator said. " Every one wants to see those who need relief get relief, but millions never reach those who need it. The amount expended before it gets to those in need is appalling. Administration Costly. "I have had brought to my attention instances in which the cost, or expense, of administering- a fund was about half the fund to be administered. Now, the loan is heavy enough for the taxpayers at best, but this shameless waste, if not worse, will have to have an end, not only in the name of the hungry and needy but in the interest of decency." The senator added that he didn't see how a congressional investigation of the relief administration could be avoided. Senator Borah declined to amplify his statement, made in Chicago, that the Republican party would have to be reorganized, but he said the overwhelming victory of the Roosevelt forces did not constitute popular approval of the New Deal. A great body of citizens voted for the Democrats either because they were on the pay roll and afraid to vote otherwise, or 1 because the Republican party failed to offer them an alternative, he said. Renews Attack on NRA. Renewing his attack on the NP,A, Senator Borah said it had brought about the greatest concentration of wealth in the history of this country and that the Democratic party was the best friend big business ever had. " The NRA has taken the bridles off the monopolies and broken down the anti-trust laws," the senator said. " Standard statistics reports show that for the first six months of this year 402 corporations of a monopolistic nature had net gains of 608 per cent." Hollywood Surgeon Weds Evelyn Knapp Today Hollywood, Cal., Nov. 9.(W)---The marriage of Evelyn Knapp, screen actress, and Dr. George A. Snyder, Hollywood surgeon, will be performed tomorrow in the Santa Barbara home of Phillip Chancellor, the couple announced today. They said they would return here by automobile after the ceremony. 1, ,. CHICAGO A 100 CATHOLIC CHURCH BISHOPS WILL ATTEND CARDINAL'S JUBILEE Plans for the culmination of Cardinal Mundelein's silver jubilee celebration in a great votive mass of thanksgiving at Holy Name cathedral on Nov. 20 are rapidly reaching completion. , The co-chairman of the festival committee, Bishops Bernard J. Sheil and William D. O'Brien, have announced that 100 archbishops and bishops, including Cardinal Patrick J. Hayes of New York, have signified intention to attend. During the ceremony the 500 silver medals struck at Rome by Pope Pius In honor of Chicago's cardinal arch. bishop will be distributed among distinguished prelates and guests attending the celebration. The medal was executed by the Italian sc,ulptor, Silvia Silva, with the cardinal's profileon the obverse side of the medal and the facsimile'of the chair the cardinal occupied during the commemorative mass at St. Peter's cathedral in Rome on the reverse side. SEWELL AVEIY ACCEPTS POST IN LIBERTY LEAGUE Sewell Avery yesterday added another post to the many he now occupies by accepting a place on the enlarged executive committee of the American Liberty league, founded with the Idea of protecting the constitution. " I have an enthusiastic feeling as to the need of the league In meeting our present day problems," he. said, " and I am in full sympathy-with its views, which already are well known." Mr. Avery is president and chairman of Montgomery Ward & Co., and president of the U. S. Gypsum company. Word from New York is that the league plans to increase its Activities in Illinois. A massmeeting in Chicago is scheduled near the end of this month. At this gathering Al Smith and other speakers of national prominence are expected to be on the program. THAT HOT STOVE ALMOST MEANS COOLER FOR HIM Stealing a hot stove is, proverbially, an unusual feat, but Mr. Frank Darmofil went it one better yesterday and returned one. Mrs. Marie Darmofil of 3110 South Mosspratt street wanted Frank, whom she had divorced, cited for contempt for taking a piano and a stove from their home. Thereby, her attorney, Victor Frohlich. said, he had violated an injunction. Darmofil said he had returned the piano, but couldn't do as much for the stove, because it was too hot. Judge Rudolph Desort said that, hot or not hot, that stove had to be returned, or Darmofil would go to jail. The stove was returned within a few hours. II 2 1.1. $3 $350 $4 MEN'S GLOVES of choice imported pigskin, deerskin, goatskin, African capeskin and genuine Arabian mochaat iSWW2M TAX-FREE , Every pair individually cut by hand ' State at Jackson - swam You can't compare an. individually hand cut glove with one that's block cut or machine cut. ' These are hand cutand they fit to perfectionsome are Inaimfacturer's samplesothers were, made , up , especially for us during slack times, when prices were lowall are of choice, care-s fully selected leathers-- all actual $3;. $3.50, $4 values at $2.45 Practically every- conceit?able size, color and style, Maurice L Rothschild OMIREiMaiMM 11 71 , 1 r. 4 4k , , , -f f p y ; ) , , 1 - , , , , , - , , , - SATURDAY. NOVEMBER- :10; 1934-- RELIEF COAL BILL IN OUNTY $195,000 BY NRA IERC Reveals Increase in , Dealer Margin. ., How Washington officials of the National Recovery, administration, who were expected to cut the $1.75 dealers' margin on relief coal for Cook county, instead raised it to $1.88 a ton, thereby increasing the cost to taxpayers another $195,000, was revealed yesterday at a meeting of the Illinois Emergency Relief commission. This means that the fuel bill for famties on relief in the county during the , approaching winter will be at least 82,000,000 higher than it would have been on the basis of prices 'paid In 1933. However, not a single expression of protest was made by the commission members, who have- often remarked that it- is " government-money -" that forms the backbone of relief expenditures in this state. No one pointed out that these funds must come from taxation upon the public. - - State's Largest Coal Buyer. , It is estimated that 1,500,000 tons of coal will be used by Cook county relief families, making the relief commission the largest purchaser of coal in Illinois. About 7 per cent of all coal consumed in the state is now bought by the commission. But the unprecedented volume of buying has not been turned to any price - advantage by the commission. It was learned yesterday that 62.8 per cent of the coal used in Cook county will be from southern , Illinois mines, while central Illinois mines will get 29 per 'cent of the' business and the Belleville , mining district 9.9 per cent. ' Southern Illinois , coal -will cost the commission about 95.73 a ton, taking Into account a discount of 10 per cent on the price at the mine, and a special freight discount of 20 per cent, V which - maxis71itt1e - because of restrictions connected with , its appli cabilit3r, , ' 3 Still Paid in.1933. -:--- , CoMparing with this are prices averaging : $4.17aton ,paid on contracts let to two large coal -compa-. flies Feb. 12, 1933. Competitive bidding was employed then, but since has been 'forbidden under the NBA retail coal code for the Chicago district. Chairman Robert J. Dunham declared that the high prices had at-&acted 1, 1,500 bidders, whereas last year there were but 40. - The commission finally voted to reject-all of the coal bids which have now been under consideration for several months on grounds that contracts under the NRAcode would give no: 'protection against price raising. Executive:, Secretary. Wilfred S. Reynolds termed the-proposed contracts " a plaything." . Users!Will Choose Dealers. ...Instead the commission will employ a Osten' similar to that, now used in the purchase of groceries. All coal dealers with wards will be eligible for relief business, providing they comply with7the' code, and Will lie posted on ' SAY 1 L. THIS PLUNGER GOES UP AND F I DOWN AS EAR4 AS FALLIN-,4 OFF 11 .A LOG ! I Both of these cylinders hold the same amount of oil. But the plunger moves easily in winter grade Iso:Vis "D". - 4IVITS117 We,, 4'.. . . WINTER GRADE IOuVIS y It takes strength to raise this plunger in cold weather. The . , wrong winter oil thickens as the mercury drops, ROA See what you save with the correct winter oil! Stop at any Standard Oil Station and try this "gadget" for yourself 1 " The wrong kind of oil thickens and gets sticky in cold weather. It grips the pistons in your car just the way it grips one of the plungers in the little demonstrator-gadget on display now at Standard Oil Stations. , Stop by and-work it yourself! I You'll see at a glance why it will pay you to fill your crankcase with the right cold-weather grade of anti-sludge IsoVis "Deither low or 20-Wand use no other motor oil throughout the winter season. The free and easy way :that left-hand plunger goes up and down is just the way the pistons and other moving parts of your motor will work either in extreme cold or at high engine heat. 1 This light, free-flowing Iso "D", 10 -W or 20-W, thwkens s; little at below-zero temperatures, and yet thins out so little when the mercury rises or the engine gets hot, that it allows your engine to start quickly with less strain on the starter and drain on th6 battery. Yon get silky-smooth engine - performance without that waste of power, gasoline and money' that .comes with the drag- of heavy , oil. And the reasonif you like technical termsis that these two oils have a remarkably . , - 0- 8 SHORT MINUTES and you're ready for any weather , a list in the various relief stations. Relief clients " will select the dealer they prefer and give him the coal ticket when the fuel is delivered. 4 By. its action yesterdaythe .cOMmission eliminated 1,100 small 'dealers who have: no 'yard:but fhave delivery equipment. -- Mr. Dunham-said- he- believed these . men would be able to make deliveries for the yard dealers, although he was told that this was impossible because it would not be permitted by the coal teamsters' union. , Greater Burden in Prospect. Charles W. McCoy, president of the United Retail Coal Dealers' association, comprising the dealers without yards, appeared before the commission recently and warned that a large proportion of the members would be forced to go on the relief rolls if they were not given a share of the relief business. In addition to , the $2,000,000 increase in fuel cost, the commission therefore concluded its meeting with the prospect that several hundred families will soon be added to the relief rolls. Executive Secretary Reynolds yesterday was notified by Attorney General Otto Kerner that cash relief could not be given to the commission's " clients " from state funds. RENc.,-1 pOLIcg :.;. ..ç ..sgqgi.:mAlyqER. 11N NEW SCAINDAL t PARISI Nov; 9.--L--OPY---Reielations of a new-alleged finanCial swindle of vast proportions, involving the Juggling of millions of francs through a complex - network of companies ,,,today resulted in the arrest of Joseph- Levy. Police-struck at the activities of Levy, and his cousin, Charles Levy, and made a search of their offices. ' t The Levys, charged with abuse of Confidence, floated several hundrede of millions of francs worth of bonds. Several men high in the government were on the directorates of some of the firms -which benefited.- The police charged that the govern. ment paid 1,900,000 francs to one of the Levy -.companies to be passed on by it to manufacturers whose plants were damaged in the war. The manufacturers, the charges continued, did not receive ,' the money. i WOMAN, MAN SEA1N-4 Durant. Okla... Nov.'9.ffp)--The alleged jealousy of his-wife over his reputed attentions to another woman. led to the slaying here today of, Mrs. May,. Whittington. 39. and the suicide of Arthur Smith, 48. ' I:1' "high viscosity index," an unusually- stable body. Let the Standard Oil Servismart take 8 ininiites or, less to drain out that heavy oil and refill ir crankcase with the proper cold-weather grade of Iso "D". He follows' the very latest recoma mendations of motor manufacturers for winter lubrication. He gives you what your engine ne,eds and so saves you real money! I k -11.".......4.11. 4 441-1k AAt WI AT HER isozyls ",D" MOTOR, OIL : , :ZDC a qt. PLUS. FEDERAL TAX ' rs a q TOTAL '-- ' ' 26c a qt. At all Standard Oil Stations and Dealers - , TOTAL ' 1! ' I - Cour. 1934. Standard On C. efl , .ALSODISTRIBUTORS OF ATLAS TIRES AND BATTERIES 'AND STANOLEX FUEL - - , I:1 , . . , , , , - , ' '' . - , t- ',.. ' :,-..- ' , , . , ., , ,,,, . ' Anneenimemeel : , . , ,, , 111111111111111111k. ., , , , E---J c". ,..1, 0 : : c 11 ;11: ql1ww ' . , In 1--- . . ,,,,...,L 13 , , . ,, , ,,..'IL , , . ...1,. . , . . , , ,, . .,,0 , . , ,, , , .,, . . ,,,,A00-------.4.4"..,,,,.,...,, .. . , , ,, .,. ., TRY ... ep, T 'TH I S ONE ' . ,t.,,,I, , igi -, - SAY' t 4, , .-,:,, . ,.. .. 1 ..,. 1,. ,- - ,i , :.., c ,,,,,,,,,,, - , , . - - , 44,,,,:iii, , , , , , , 4, ,,, t BROTHER! :. . ., , ,, jr! fit5-4-.'I' , . ,:,:i.,..-, ,,s4- ..) :,. - t . , . i THIS PLUNGER ' : y ' -N I i!;:,;-:, . ,,,,..5 I, , :. ,,,,,, i ' . . :::: ,-., L,. ' -GOES . UP AND ,. ;' j,:::,: k:::::, :44, -t r--1 , 1p -.P.m..... , b. it. , . c . I - -- '' . ' ITYSTICKS , , , - , , , ..... .,r , ic,:,, A , . , q NI --"71:4:-- u Q, ' ... . , ..v!,--fiTe , ,PAv ',,-4 , , , N. . 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' - ' ,F4-, c','-' :"----i';,-.;.:;:', ',.-;-).-A.:::0::::-:-e.;.:, -.::,1;:;-'; ' .i..1 -0',:,..-1?.i.:'-.4.,:',..1:-::-.. M-j- .i , iiW4A ' ,'. : ,.,-;: i'H-::-.:.- 06',iiii:M5::iiiiii:ig,-: i. -i;i:: . ii'',.i Agi?::.:3ii.,:.,:::i:i:it- ,::fe: :-: ":::.;iii::.:-: :: . . - . , -, . . . ' -.A:: :..: ii-:',:,:' 4::i:.:-:;U::.-;,iii:E:--1-..:. ,:::::',:- ' 1::: $i310-4:0.::::.:: .:,...::::,...,?:...:.,-, . -.?..,-..,1 -: ,, , .. :': :" '; ''A:iNZ.4:4-i:Ii- :1:-::- . -:-:: ., 4'0 ':?!i: 5,:',.,:iiiZli :: f : ::;:',!i'; . 1 . ' , , - ' ; 4: '-':'',,:i i.- :' :;A:,,x,:,- ,,,,,,,,,:.: ',v., , . , -, -:, .0-,.:,::, . -,. ,: ,...: ,,:,, ,,,,,,,:.: ' It takes strength to raise . this , - ,k-:-.5:,.::: - :,::,5,4:::,:,,,,,,:,:, - :,,, :-..., -z- :,:?.i:., - ::, .:0-,..... . . Both of these cylinders hold -zs: . ,,,:,..,.k,. , ;.. . , ...,,. .. ..... 3 : ge '' 4::',.1. 4.,:c.i..1.. i.l.::i;.i.::..:.,:..::..:, .' :0,..... ..:::,:,::::::.::::::::::::;:;::.: , : ::. :::::::::::',..: . : , .:,:::,:,:... : .. ..,..i.,.. , , ......:.,,:.: ,::: the same amount of oil. But . . - - - - , 4 I -r- ..4.:.. .: ,:..., . 4.:..:.,k,:, i:t : e. , ..:. .L...,;,....i..,:: .....4... ,,: . :., ....! si:',...,..;:::..,....:. .:,.. ,: : : ...:' :: ::::.... ...1,..;. : ..,..:: :.. i: :::. i. :it: ..: ....... : v....:.;,:;;:: ,....i: . . . p.lunger. .,.11 cold weather The i - , :-. ,&: -,, ; ;:::::i::::. i;:,,,,,,::.:5,,,;.,,::-;,::",::,-0-. , --,;;Aiii,,i:-- :.,::.:?:.:,:;:,:::mmiRiiii,-,:m.:4,- :: .. ,,,!?: ,,,,,- -;., ::::,:::::::: : 2.;.,--:;,,,,,--A,-,i.-:' --, - t .::-..,;.--, :.44:::.: ,:ii-::-:',.-:,:.';:i:i::::.::.:i,,-::::i?:::::a:1-::..:im., :,--,-.-:: - f: - & . the plunger moves easily in -,,, -- . ..,, .f le-,.::.i:;iii::,-: :.-:--::-:-ii-:i:.i..:::.,::,:f.,::-i-,:K.::-f,,:::,..-.::-.:::;:..:.,-,w.3.-n.4,.. ":,::.: 1 , wrong winter oil thickens ,s i, ,::,,:"-, ..3:,:: .:-:::: . . : i: . ;-c:...,::-afq , ,- , '- the mercury drops , . ,-., -;.,-,-,i,::::.::::::::.:, ,,;:::::,:i::::::::i-,K:i::;:,i:-..,:,K,i,,,,,,,:w., . , 0,,?, , ,,:', ,,,.....,:,....,-;-;--:-,,,,-.,,-,:i,:,,,::,,,.:,,::,:,:::::::::::,,::::,:-,,,,- . .. winter grade Iso:Vis "Ln. F,R,-.:'.:::,:.':,':,..:... ,''' li:1-,;::',1:::-,!,':',.-i t):.:;-;,::-.4:;:::.,i,i:::,:.;)::... . ,- , -,,,--.--,:.,:,;,,,,,-.:-:. -,:', . .., . , ... , .. .;,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,---., :.:.?;3.:iiiii.:', I . , , . , . iel:....e..1.....7..:.. . ' ... d 1. ':.:-....t.. . .' 7 .,,, -'- It ., , 16' : .;:::.,,,::::: .... - --, dr; t '444 -4. -1-0 ' 'W,,,.ii.ii-:4 41:::r PULL ,, ::4-.:-.:,: Pl:..?:4.i . .4title ! r." (:, i:::.:....:.:;;., -.1'.-- -- e , tt -, - ,,,-- v -:.::;:-.:::,:i,:, :::e.::.::: IL ' ) 4a 0 ,,Anr :-.-iiiiiillii WINTER TH E , , ,:?,.:,,,.;,, . ,,,, : 4 . , , 4 , p...,; . i:::::::11 GRADE A imi L NiruLLP RGE 'S :.,,,,,,,,:: ..-i- . . ,:,,,..,::: .,,,,, ,.; , ,,,, ... I WRONG ' : .-.-r,',:gliif , ., e,, .,,. , , , ,,, ,,,,..,,,..., . 1 SO inli 1 S A :- ;2.::: SE , ". 1... 4 R WI MIER ....;.' :,i.,.:,.:, .,. ,,, -0:.,it , , ; ; ,,,,::::: : ' . , .,,,,,,,,,,:l t I P A RI LID." All I , i,1 .q....:Ew...,, ir 'I ,. -...- -. . , . 1., .4. -,t,:-...,:::-...,,f- , .. Atlit, . ,- s '';'.:-.,:::::.:-:, - 1 tiM W IINT sE , a Ni 0 LN ......:. . ,:. . ..g. .- -;:i::: , ...,..... , . . . .. . , , ' , , .- , - I .. .9 .-- . , - ,,,' : . 41---z-A- ...;,-, .-, , 0 . 0 , ):,,lk ,- . 7.?"1 I .-------- , - VP - '' -,---1--- , , . . . ALSO DISTRIBUTORS OF ATLAS TIRES AND BATTERIES AND STANOLEX . . . , - C14 - t1 I k I , ' . , . . . The free and easy. way :that left-hand plunger : - ...... ..... . goes up and down is just the way the pistons and . NO' ... , .. -Other moving . parts of your motor will work . , , . . . , .. . . , ,. , -- - .,..f.:::::::::,,i ci.:. D RAI J AND 0213111a - :, '., '', -: '',.. . either in extreme cold or at high engine heat. ' ft10.0.R.! ! , , , ' I. -This light, free7flOwint, lsoVis "1:r 10.-W.or 0 ID ;', .f:;:iimi:iiii,,,,. 'ir ...':':;!-,' i - CORD VV.. AIME!? ,: , , , 1 , , 20-W, thickens s; litikat'Velow-zero temperatures,' ,:,:$0Wtig: . .:., -1, t ;---i' -.- and. yet thins out s llitie when the mercury rises or ,v1-0:,:,e,,-.-- '"!!;, :- . , , 4 .. '; ;:. . . - ' : ,-. g:::::i...-: .. t:',..V.ii . - the engine gets hot, . that it allows your engine, to ,..,,,,,O ':::::.:IiiA: -,,,, ::;::.:''..4'": 4t-''; :...:::.1....-.; ' : 'Illy ,,,,,, , ,,x, Yf-::,.f.;,:,Y; Nit: . ' - . - 11 start quickly with- less strain on the starter and ,, ,.;.:.::.:44,1::,..., ,,4;:., ,.,:ft-e.,::.:11;.:::,-,.:i,f,:i,-1,:i III- Ih drain on the battery .' You get silky smooth engine 7 ::.!(:'i'llk-!.M5J 5. ,:::.......I.Tititi:j4..- ,............ . . , ......... :--:,' ;::,..:,:"1",:::;;OMMIaai ,- , - . ...... performance 'without that :waste of power, gasoline li- :Ii.' .,.,...-::;.3,1i.,:-i...:.,:,:.:xi::-.:if::-:i:-:::::.::.ii::::ie.::.:.:i::.:4 , An ORE ,i 'KATE. ' -. :'.:i: :1;.n.:.:iignffigge ' and money that , Come . with :the drag a remarkably of heavy :, .g' :: R?'' :.,'; . .,:'. , -::4.0,0,:WI,Iiii,';''::,:i -:-, , ...itotal,4, Orhireb 0 . .. :-:;,.,; ..' . ; , ' , oil. And the freasönif '; you like - technical - - ,..,:;,i,:rsi- v... ,...W.- ss:::;.:-:..eniiiq .,-....i.:::. ''',,,..14,4.' ;,- -'--?'-'2,:WN:m: ; cgs termsis that these two . oils have ,;(11,,r,:: .:0".. ,.-- . ...:F:::,:,:,:got .i . 4 v 0-w .00. , 64 BELOW ZERO . - tz -... ; . - ., - ', ''''':i:: ..-' . :.,;.$.:: - . 0-7 IUR if.Sttl f BELOW. ,ERO - . i - ..:E.:i.:;- :..:,,.-N. . :iii::-4 ,e1; , , , - - , , , ;, t - t ........................ ...- .,..:: ::i,:.:.i,--,:,.v-:,.:., - - , . , , -.......-....... .... . , :...:.:.,.:.,.::,...,....-..y....:.: , , GET OUT ,, - '. ........-......-..-:...............-...................-.............,.......-....-::........-.2....--..,,,:: :,::1-.!-:::v3i-A T -, , " -- " -- - --, - . 1.4m:A '- ISO:NIS D MOTOR OIL , , I 0 25c a , -, ci' ts 4. . ....................... --- ..... . . -- L ., . SLUDGE,' ? :, , .;'::.!1!::;44,;;:' ..:.-;lk:iiiiiiiiii:i:,:i:::.:7.1',. , PLUS.FEDERAL-TAX f ' iC a qt; ''. . ,,,', .. ''''Al 7 , :' ;1 's . ,0 ' " You OLD POWER ' C - . : ) i:151:4:i' ',,:.--::',-!, -,- : 4.AtirAggia::, ' , - ,,,,, WASTER I 4 ': . , ,. ,:i::..,, k-1,1:1glantg:.i ', TOTAL t. -:.;. . t .--!': L---.?..:- '. ,.. .'-..- . e. : 26c a qt.. -1 t'n" 4'N, -- - 116 ; --.;,,,,.,..::?;.--a,, '--.--..::-"-K--- 4j :- ..- . At all Standard Oil Stations and Dealers . : : - , UPtlittimal 4,11, , 1 4. I : r " , . , A A - Cour. 1934. Standard 011 C .. , , - - . , . sial'"?,:;:'::k:::':.!:.:::1':'::rtg :::7"7:7 - ;77,1 '. PM,,,,31,03.e: ' :'. : :'::.:'::::':1'7: 4 .f.'..77.7.4N, : :::::.:,$,::ti,T.i6:::,(,, ...... - r' ,. . . .-:7,...7 :,!':::-;'::' F-, -':,: ,::',4,v,::- :,::.4, --,::e it.,,,::::- ,:, : ::,.::::';:!Y:::1.:':.ii,, ' ' ::,::.'' .,-.,p,- ' ' :::,:: ::::.::ii,J.4.:::::,:::i::.,,,,:,3isl-M.71"4.,,.4-, .;:',:,;.;;:::;.:'::: '.1i ..:::::".!: --41.:::::::-.14, - , '.H...' ',4, '':,,..i.;::.::;:-::!4.::.5:.:;i::;;:..:.:'1,,.. ..: ..":4..'1:!.',;::.::'9.!':,r ,,1 ':'''' : ...:',.::::;',;:',.:.?::::.:::::!i!.::.:;.:!..:.:1..:- - ....'-.7 7!:;.;::;'.:tiO'',:::.,-:,. ,!.9.,.; .!.;s:i0:1.:':"::3:..: ::::':4';-....','!:''''''''.4-''';': ' r4". ::,.!:::A ,,- ,!:,::::':'..'sii:-.4?,,i i' ' ''4,i't:,:::::::::::':VIsf, ' ' :t: :; 3 .,,.! , :-:,--0.' ..,,; ,., 5 0 ....,,,,,. -,i:,::!:::,'',:d' :. ., 4 r' ,,,;,z,:::.;1,:::,:,s,,rv.,4 ,.........,....:..:..., ....0,,:" 1..,.4,,.., .....:, nti. :. .:i ' :.e7 . :::::!4111.1 .5.. 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' --,44. 4. :i5,41 ''...'!".1 i..ekikt,;,:".,,,1'.. 4':' 'e,',k-4'0 "I''' ;:i'", :,.. :-::::'.....'.: 1 ::'!.:::: . : . :.!';!..'...r.::!. -:.: ::,:' t--::::''..tks 7,','-: 1 I L .-- ':'r---::.::'-'----:-;::-...:fkil ' ...':: -4- A -:' -::..:',-':-:::.:;:-:;:s.,- :::-::":::-:.: 1::.-.::::::::::-.?::::;-,:,..:.,:.4??.:::.;:::::-.;:::::::::::::::.::::,:.:'.:::: .. .,.. . ::; . .: . : : :. :: '-':: - - - , , , , ' AIMOM00 - , - 7 4 ' , , I . . I d' .. -

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