The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on March 30, 1956 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, March 30, 1956
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Page 3
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FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1956 BLTTHEV1LL1! (ARK.) COURIER NEWS HOLLAND NEWS By Mrs. Ed Hampton. It Enter Services Evangelist Priscilla Price will hold services at the regular hour Sunday morning at Church of God. From two until four in the afternoon the youth of this church and visiting churches will hold a sing festival which they plan to continue, alternating in different church communities. The worship service at Church o£ Christ will began at ten for Sunday School. Unpastored at the present time, this church plans on a visiting minister delivering the Easter message. Through sunrise prayer services at the Methodist Church at six- thirty Sunday morning, organ music will be played softly-_and reverently during the devotional hour. A breakfast will follow. At First Baptist Church Rev. Harold E. Bailey will hold a brief sunrise service about six o'clock. •Three Grasses on a Hill" will be his subject. Rev. Don Maxfield, a chaplain of 'Blytheville Air Force Base, pre- Ruth Roman Gets Divorce SANTA MONICA, Calif. Iff) — "He told me I was stpuid and said he wished he never married me," testified actress Ruth Roman winning a divorce from Mortimer Hall, Los Angeles radio station owner. Superior Judge yvalter H. Ode- mar granted the decree yesterday on grounds of mental cruelty. Miss Roman received custody of the couple's son, Richard, 3, and $500 a month for his support. They wera married in 1950. Suspects Have Pocket Stew HARRISBURG, Pa. VP> — Two men were hauled into the Harrisburg: police station and booked on charges of "disturbing the peace. Sgt. Paul Towsen ordered the pair to empty their pockets. Results: Two ears of com still in the husk; three oranges; a handful of string beans; 2J4 wrinkled hot dogs; a half loaf of stale bread and one brown banana. "We were going to make a bit of tasty stew," one of the men explained. sented unbiased religion in his talk at Tuesday's Parent-Teacher's Association. "Is It Well With Your Child Spiritually?" was his subject which he answered with the direct reply "If It be Well with the Parent." Girl Scouts and Brownies gave a repeat performance of folk songs and dances which they did during Scout anniversary week. The Brownies represented little English maids as they sang and danced "Queen Mary". "The Crested Hen", a Danish folk number, was performed by the scouts. Mrs. Witt Smith, Sr., was elected president of Holland Parent-Teachers. Retiring president, Mrs. Cleatus, was made vice president; Mrs. Evelyn Samford, secretary and Mrs. Andrew Jenkins, treasurer. Tops at Bottom WAYNESBORO, Va. (SI — Mystified Waynesboro city workers retrieved 16 garbage can lids from the bottom of South river. More were at the bottom, too deep to be reached. How'd they know .about it? The cans themselves were still in the back yards of irate householders who flooded city hall with complaints. Future Farmers of America had their fathers as guests at a father- son banquet Friday night in the school's Lunch room. A parliamentary procedure team performed a short skit showing correct steps in business transaction of an organized club. Senator J. P. Patterson of Caruthersville addressed the group. Fathers were introduced by their sons. Board members and honorary guests were introduced by President Jackie Kenley. The barbecued hair, dinner was served cafeteria style to the seventy-odd present. Donald Long is instructor of the local PPA chapter. Pictures of the event were made by Howard L. Yeager for the chapter scrap book. "Comin 1 Round the Mountain" is the title of the three act comedy chosen by the senior class to be presented at eight o'clock Prida in the school auditorium. "Comin' Round the Mountain" is a truly novel comedy of happen ings in the back *oods of the momv tain country. Memory marvel William Wallace, associated with International Lectures of Independence, Mo., captivated his audience of school students Wednesday at assembly. Mr. Wallace performs feats of miracles through a visualizing process trained to a high degree of efficiency. He has appeared in Ripley's "Believe It or Not" series. Considered a .twentieth century mental marvel, his ability to retain ex riences is said to be unequaled. School superintendent L. N. Kinder Wednesday attended a school administration dinner at Rustic Rock in Sikeston where Everette Keith, executive secretary of MSTA gave the address. Senator John Noble and Dr. W. W. Parker, president of Semo State College, were honored guests. Wednesday night Mrs. A. W. Phillips was hostess to a canasta foursome. Her guests were Mrs. Nina Richard, Mrs. Carrie Kelley Easter Greetings May the coming of this Holy Day lift your heart and may you find peace and comfort in the beauty and magnificence of your church this Easter Sunday. Blytheville Federal Savings & Loan Association -OPEN- ELLIS & HARRINGTON SHEET METAL WORKS 203 North 1st St. Next Door to Westbrook Machine Shops , Gutter Work - Duct Work All Types Sheet Metal Work Prompt Service—All Work Guaranteed -Phone 3-4161- The Angry Hills -^ . By Loon M. Ura © WS b» Un M. Urii. Us«f by Ofi «M Mo* HMM, hc,Dii(rik«W * MIA. THE STORY: Mike Morrl.n, an Amrricna. ha. bec» caught bj the German Invasion of Gr«ce In 11M1. Wor«e. he *>«• information tnnt tne U*rmnn« want, a coded ll»t of Underground lenders ke wa« lo delirer to London. A Brit Ink Intelligence agent, Soutar, U killed d»il»I <*e «"cape. • « • XII HEILSER had told the American Embassy quite truthfully that he wished he knew where Morrison was and that be was looking for Morrison day and night. He did not, however, mention what would happen when he found Morrison. The Embassy even went so far as to oblige Heilser with two pictures of the American. One from a dust jacket ol a book, another from a passport. Unfortunately one could not identify his own mother from such photos. The trained agent takes certain paths, certain risks. The trained agent puts his mission above his life. Not so the desperate amateur. He will be unorthodox, develop the cunning of a wild animal to keep alive. Heilser reconstructed the chain of events. First, Mosley's call from Kalamai informing him that Morrison had not escaped from Greece and had been located in the B.E.F. Heilser had dashed to Corinth. Morrison had never showed up. Then, Mosley's body was discovered near the beach at Kalamai and Heilser knew the desperate amateur had won a round. Next, Soutar's body was found near the railbed outside Naup- lion. Heilser had questioned every prisoner and guard who rode the train. Heilser was able to establish the fact that Morrison had been on the train with Soutar and that they had tried to escape a few moments apart. Soutar had failed, Morrison had succeeded. Zervos stood in th« drawing room with his hat in his hand. His envious eyes moved around the luxurious suite. Soon my time will come, Zervos thought. Reward from these German louts is small but a man can make his own rewards. He, Zervos, had played the right side. German occupation was a fact. A man does not want to be a government clerk all his life. He thought of some of the wealthy Greek citizens. He, Zervos, had the power of the German police behind him. Soon he would be paying friendly visits to these wealthy compatriots of his. He would advise them, in a nice way of course, that they were suspect by the Gestapo. Zervos could be their friend and benefactor and could arrange protection for them. Unfortunately, such protection would cost quite a sum of money Zervos' dream vanished as Heilser entered. For a second they exchanged stares of mutual hate, distrust and fear. Zervos shrugged his shoulders and flopped his hands to his side in a helpless gesture. "He has disappeared into thin air. We have turned Nauplion inside out." Heilser squashed his cigaret. "Do you know what kind of a man we are up against? We are up against a cornered rat. Nothing is more dangerous, more ingenious than a man who fights for his life." Then Heilser began to recite, as though he were speaking to himself: "He will try to get to Athens sooner or later. He will try to contact someone here. It will be someone Soutar told him to contact. One of a dozen known sympathizers of the British whom we already keep under scrutiny." • * * MIKE MORRISON glanced around at the walls and stopped again and again to gaze at pictures of men with bushy beards or women with startling big black eyes. Scattered around the room were rudely built chairs and tables with a large loom in the center. In an instant his mind flooded with recollections and he bolted up, then overcome by dizziness,, and flopped back on the bed—3 six-foot-wide bed built over an oven. A handsome, tanned girl of 20 stood over him. She had' huge black eyes and her jet-black hair fell softly onto a pair of smooth brown shoulders. She wore a multicolored skirt with a wide belt that reached clear up to her short bolero jacket. "Help me up—I've got to get to Athens. . .." "Calispera," the girl whispered and ran from the room like a startled fawn. Mike tried to struggle up. Out 01 the corner of his eye, he spotted his clothes on a chair near the bed. He reached out and worked through the pockets until he felt a pistol which he placed beneath his pillow. In a few moments the girl returned with a man. * * * THE man was short and stocky and bald except for a horseshoe fringe of hair. He sported' an enormous, neatly waxed, handie- bar mustache and wore a ballerina skirt with long white stockings banded in black around the knees. He had on a white blouse and a small cap falling away into a long tassel, and on his feel were pointed slippers with bright red pompons. The ballerina man announced with much gusto in broken English, "I am Christos Yalouris, and this is my niece, by name— Eleftheria. Eleftheria, takes care of my aged mother in Dernica but I sent for her to attend you. And what is your name?" Mike's hand reached up and felt the bandages binding his head. His fingers traced a large scab which ran from his forehead to his jaw. "I'm—I'm sorry. . . . Forgive me. My name is Jay—Jay Linden," Mike said. "Where—where am I?" "You are in Paleachora." ; (To Be Continued) and Mrs. Abernathy-of Steele. She served a frosted drink in tall amber glasses with a frozen dessert. In room 1026 at Baptist Hospital, Memphis, Mrs. Claude Samford is 1 , recovering nicely from surgery ten days ago. She will probably return lome today or tomorrow. Guests in the nome of Mr. and Mrs. John Duvall within the past ew days include Mr. and Mrs. Louis White of Osceola and Mr. and Mrs. John Wint of St. Louis. Mr. Wint las recently arrived from England, laving been in the .regiment with ;he Duvall's son airman James J. Creasy who is stationed near London. Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Pinkston of Sayti were here Thursday at Mrs. Maud Richard's before their departure for Ions, Mich., where they visited Mrs. Naomi Pinkston Bookout, a patient of an lona Hospital. Accompanying the Pinkstons were! Mrs. Nellie Allen and Ray Pinkston of Kennett; Cleo Pinkston and .Rev. J. L. Pinston of Marmaduke, Ark. Billie Lutes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Lutes, is visiting a sister, Mrs. Jerry Reid, in Blytheville. Having lost his left leg in an "unloaded" gun accident last, October, Billie is awaiting an appointment for an artificial leg fitting. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hampton, Jr., were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Max Parker in Keiser. Mrs. Parker returned to her home Saturday, having undergone surgery for the removal of tumors at a Memphis hospital. She is an elementary grade teacher there. Mr. Parker is with Keiser Supply Company. From Gary, Irid., Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Collins, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Lester, Harry Brown and John Cohoon were all end of week guests with Mrs. Freddie Collins, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lester, Mrs. Chester Brown and Mr. and Mrs. Russet Cohoon. Arriving at different times during ! the week, Mr. and Mrs L. T. Stinnett' and Mrs. Pearlie Lovell of Lansing, Mich., Mrs. Maudie Stinnett and son Douglas and Mrs. Bonnie Smith of Niles, Calif.; and Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Duncan of Bowling Green, Fla., all met here in the Stinnett home to spend the next few weeks together. All are former residents. From Van Wert O., Mr. and Mrs. George Height and daughters were week-end visitors of Mrs. Height's parents and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Pruitt and Diane. Mrs Height was formerly Kuth Pruitt and granddaughter of Mrs. Henry Barber. In the Cardinal Smith home Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodman of Osceola were Thursday night guests. The Smiths had returned that, day from Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberts, in Memphis, whose new baby son was born Sunday March 18. NOW! Get Meyer Z-52 Zoysia at its cool, blue-green best ... plastic packed for freshness from nearby GRENADA GREENS / ... to you.' Plant now with plugs . . . right in your lawn of other gran. Meyer Z-52 crowds out crabgrass and other grasses and weeds. If you plant now in newly prepared ground, you'll have a carefree faum of Meyer Z-52 this summer. Sprig planting in a lawn of existing grass is not recommended. It's a thrill to open a package of Meyer Z-52 Zoysia Grass in 2-inch round plugs from Grenada Greens. They look and arc a healthy, lush green on arrival . . . eager to grow into a carefree lawn for you. NOW IS THE TIME TO PLANT Lay a permanent, self-renewing, durable carpet of blue-green splendor on your lawn. Plant Meyer Z-52 now! It's a dependable, economical grass that takes the severest winters and hottest summers in stride—requires less mowing . . . even does the weeding for you . . . and grows in the shade. 2-INCH ROUND PLUGS are recommended as the easiest, surest way to plant and growth is rapid. Bareroot sod for sprig planting is also available. Set out 12 inches apart, 160, plugs will plant 160 sq. ft., 300 sprigs will plant up to 125 sq. ft. GUARANTEED TO GROW in the Blytheville area, or replaced immediately. Meyer Z-52 is packed and shipped to you the day it Is dug from carefully selected rootstock, grown only at Grenada Greens ... the South's finest turfgrass farm to serve you. Write for free information. n wrf mvftt Z-M Zorri* 3° f*f*tMr . Inc. ORDER NOW! Meyer Z-52 Zoyjii—re- cently released M a lu- pcrior hybrid lawn gran by the U. S. Dtpt. of Agriculture — is Available in limited supply 'only. Don't be disappointed. Order Meyer Z-52 Zoy •I* newt Do not confute this grats with Common Zoysia, Zoysia Matrella or other grasses. All Shipments PREPAID DEPT. 44, GRENADA, MISS. John H. Kraft. Warrw I. Snco*. pr«»id»nt Yici-pr««. t 9*11. mgr. Please send Meyer Z-52 Zoysia gna to arrive on_ - - for which I enclose my check or money order. Mock nw<4 *•*: *ff'V !»«»• D * IM» Mil- * I" r*l» Q >" (Kit a s ITM rtt •> u* M«CI a s>* •*« D I MM >*f. rf M •l*|i a $M i*t. (•«« : D' *IMM Pk* tf IM (for plug shipping, please specify: f] D ' NAME. ADDRESS- OITV L _ZONE STA1 Miss Liberty To be Museum NEW YORK W)—The Statue of Liberty, friendly, beacon to those arriving from foreign shores, will become the home of an American museum of immigration. A five-million dollar drive is under way to construct the museum as a national shrine in a star-shaped, stone-walled fort on which the base of the statue rests. Purpose of the museum is to dramatize for posterity the epic story \ of immigration in the building oi j America. j President Eisenhower has endors- j ed the project. Going to Dogs VANCOUVER, B. C. (fl — Tiki Graham captured 405 votes and third place in the race for chairman of student undergraduate so- cieties in an election at the tJnl- v:rsity of British Columbia. Tiki, a French poodle, wai put on the ballot as a student prank. His campaign slogan: "Friond of the underdog. * F.r aches, pains, cuts, bnitei, fewM, c.lds, headaches, bites and stinfi. *TJ Bob's Gypsy Rub Liniment Arailable at your favorite tnit coulter C. G. SMITH PRODUCTS CO. Store Fixtures FOR SALE Waggoner hot water heater and double sink, 1 metal 2-wheel truck, 8-drawer storage counter, 11-foot Hussman open dairy box, 1 meat block, 1 Hobart slicing machine, l S.teiner sausage mill, 1 8x8 Hussman walk-in cooler, 1 6-di*awcr desk, 1 adding machine, 1 pair Defiance scales, 1 14-ft. Hussman meat counter and pans, 1 24-ft, double gondalia, 41 ft. of wall shelving, 1 Coke ma- j chine, 1 6-hole frozen food box, 2 checking stands t 1 National electric cash register, 1 National Manual Cash Register, 1 pair U. S. Scales, 1 pair Dayton Scales, 1 5-hole open frozen food box, 10 telescope buggies, 16 buggies with baskets. CALL ROBBINS BRO. Osceola, Ark. Phone 1021 or 863 Let Us Worry About Your TERMITE TROUBLE Due to the fact that termites are becoming more prevalent in this country each year, all the new homes, as well as the old, should be under termite insurance. We find 71 lot of practically new homes with major damage caused by termites. Call us and one of our representatives will explain our termite insurance plan to you. All Work Guaranteed TERMITE CONTROL CO. SUPERIOR 535 N. 6th. State License Blytheville, Ark. Phone 2-2350 BF Goodrich PICK-YOUR-PRICE We're leveling stocks, ' rstocks bal'OC 6 , J/ inventory on Jj^JTuVrf. P' ck V° ur pr ' Ce ' • B.F. Goodrich Guaranteed NEW TREADS The N*w-tar Tube[ fess with greater skid resistant*, pat- I anted bruise-blowout protection. B. F. Goodrich SAFETYLINER TUBELESS Extra-High Clearance Trade-In Allowance 25% OFF list price as special shipment trade-in allowance on NYLON Safetyliners SAFETY-S TUBELESS Same famous tread design as formerly eame an new can . .. NOW WITH BRUISE-BLOWOUT PROTECTION. tube-type SAFETY-S IA 75 • •"•6.70-15 vilhtjt •ade-in 7.10-15 7.60-15 $20.45' $22.60* B. F. Goodrich brand new EXTRA-SERVICE 45 THE TUBE-TYPE ECONOMY TIRE 12 ^^ ^^ us l 1-Ku.e •J 1C Of ^^ E E (without trade-in) <C 3 /O W F F AS SUPER TRADE-IN List Price $57.55 SALE PRICE B. F. Goodrich NYLON-PLUS LIFE-SAVER TUBELESS WHITEWALLS B.F. Goodrich EXPRESS TRUCK TIRES • F»Hy GwmHed • Im prked igmli^i mdi tin W 95 4.00-U ft/im.rj rtpr r*rr*«4ihb *. 1 OO PUTS A NEW TIRE ON YOUR CAR DOWN B.F.Goodrich FIRST IN RUBBER - FIRST IN TUBELESS 417 W. Main St. Phon® 3-8116

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