The Leaf-Chronicle from Clarksville, Tennessee on August 6, 1972 · 47
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The Leaf-Chronicle from Clarksville, Tennessee · 47

Publication:
Location:
Clarksville, Tennessee
Issue Date:
Sunday, August 6, 1972
Page:
47
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Jane Fonda: 'An Acfress lnJKIi RGuoluiionaiQ PolSS-so' EDITOR'S NOTE When Jane Fonda made her first movie, an acquaintance described her as "a proper young lady." She's still young, but the descriptions have changed. She's called revolutionary. Communist and even traitor by some, j: By MARY CAMPBELL j AP Newsfeatures Writer NEW YORK ( AP), What path did Jane Fonda take from . Daddy's little girl to Hanoi? Jane, 'daughter of Henry, did her first acting just after high school, with her father in summer stock, in "The Country Girl" in Omaha and "The Male Animal" on Cape Cod. She did her first movie, "Tall Story," with her godfather, Josh Logan, producing and directing. An acquaintance says she was, then, "a proper young lady." These days, spearheading the traveling anti-Army FTA Show, showing up in North Vietnam for two weeks, bragging that her suitcase contains a few tops and a couple ' pairs of slacks, she is called a lot of things, but "proper young lady" isn't among them. Some think she's a Communist or a revolutionary or guilty of treason;. , - ; . "I don't think I know enough to say I am a such and such and so and so politically," she says, as she stops in New York en route to : Hanoi. -' '" "I'm hot a revolutionary. I'm an actress with revolutionary politics." j Rep. Fletcher (Thompson, R.-Ga., asked the attorney general to bring treason charges against Miss Fonda, saying that Radio Hanoi had quoted her as uring U.S. military personnel in Vietnam to disobey orders. Before she left for Hanoi, she said, "Who are we (the cast of the FTA Show) to tell soldiers? We don't have to go to the brig. I don't think our job is to tell them not to fight, or what to do. We're showing them there is support of their anti-war sentiments." The' present Jane Fonda was born, full grown two and a half years ago. She says, "I reached the age of 32 and discovered I'd wasted 32 years of my life. I realized it because of the war, because of the kind of questions that the ' Vietnam struggle is forcing us to ask ourselves about who we are, what our country means and what we're doing." There's no doubt, she says, but that she'd have developed revolutionary politics sooner if she'd been living in the United States. But in 1965 Miss Fonda married French film director Roger Vadim, whom she met when he directed her in "Circle of Love" in Paris.' She settled into life in France and family life, which included daughter Vanessa, born in 1968. ; "So 1 split. I think it's sad so many people want to leave America. I think you should come back to your country when it is going downhill. j got off the plane in Los Angeles I had been in India on the way and Indians were on my mind. Ramparts Magazine was on a, newsstand there. On the. cover was an American' Indian woman looking angry and the words lotted Power.'' I thought, what ilthis? It blew my mind. I hadn't known anything; I couldn't believe what we had done to the Indians. ! j "When I get an idea, I usually plunge in. I plunged. m i : t , f r I rK 1 i Law a n L J y iff . .. j $ i AntlMilltary Tour AP NewsfMtura ? , On tour in the Philippines with her FTA show, Jane Fonda exchanges smiles with students at a Manila school. Miss Fonda, Donald Sutherland, rear center, and other entertainers put the nonracist, nonsexist and anti-military show together for GIs and traveled to bases to give it, first in this country and then overseas. A movie was made of the five-week tour of the Pacific. ' . i "In trying to make up for 32' wasted years I went very fast and tried to make contact ! with as many people as possible." Miss Fonda spoke out on women's rights, demonstrated on behalf of welfare children and California farm workers and arranged bail f orlsome Black Panthers charged wih illegal possession of weapons. Then, she says, she decided to concentrate "on ending this war helping to have l hat happen. ;"The war relates, to everything. What we're doing to Vietnam is exactly what we did to American Indians, not only in terms of ' killing them off and destroying their land but pitting them against each other : We're destroying their culture.? That is racism and genocide and we have a history of that." :j F - ' .?' jf- I t AP Wlrephoto So is the next step the violent overthrow of the American government? ' t l-K :' -. ' ;j . ' . f 'To me revolution means rapid fundamental social change. I don'f. believe that the kind of change that is necessary is going to happen through evolution. Who wants violence? I don't..' I hate violence. But I don't think it is going to be up to us to decide." ?w.nimer; Chorus. Concert erybody else is much more conservative, Vadim continues to live b France. "We're separated, not Regally, just separated. We're friends. My daughter is over there now." Hanoi Visitor Jane Fonda wears a helmet during a visit to an antiaircraft gun unit in Hanoi. Miss Fonda recently visited iWh Vietnam. The photograph is a radio photo monitored in Warsaw, Poland. Is Saturday At Lipscomb AP Newsfeatura Actress And Activist Jane Fonda gestures as she talks earnestly about her political beliefs in a New York interview. Miss Fonda, who won an Oscar for "Klute," calls herself "an actress with revolutionary politics,'! and has recently become one of the most spotlighted female political activists. Her main concern at present is to bring about an end to the war in Vietnam. - ' I ' I -l - : ! ' .4 s t; :. . ; Jane Fonda was nominated for an Oscar for "They Shoot Horses Don't They?")ast year but did not win. This year she won for "Klute." Some have speculated that the climate in Hollywood has beconie more accepting: of an actress with revolutionary political ideas. Miss Fonda says, "I guess they just thought I gave a better performance. I thought so, too." v IS . David Lipscomb College will present its summer chorus in a free program Aug. 12 at 8 p.m. in McFarland Hall. Soloists Jerry Jennings and Marion Cawood are members of the Lipscomb faculty and have sung in opera in Europe as well as in solo engagements in this country. : - , Jennings, a tenor, is under contract with Columbia Artists ami sings frequently in New York and other cities throughout the country. ' -: j ' Miss Cawood is now appearing as soloist in a comic opera program at Cheekwood in Nashville and will be soloist with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra in the coming season. She is a Soprano, . : t Director of the chorus is Dr. Gerald Moore, assistant professor of music. Students to be featured in the latter number are. Gil Lamb, Nashville, drums; Bobette Bonds, Libertyville, . III., vibraphone; and Annette Johnson, Glasgow, Ky., electric piano. ; , ; i

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