The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 4, 1953 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, May 4, 1953
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Page 7
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MONDAY, MAY 4, 1953 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Big Hydrogen Blast May Be Included In Next A-Tests Bj- ELTON C. FAY WASHINGTON (AP) — The next series of atomic tests in the Pacific probably will include hydrogen explosions of unprecedented magnitude. Using 'knowledge and materials i tried out -cautiously In two previous series involving "thermonuclear" experiments—the most recent of which reportedly produced the mightiest manmade blast so far—scientists and military men are setting the scene for what is expected to be a still more awesome test shot or shots. The majority of the comparatively minor-stale explosive tests of devices and weapons now under way at the Nevada Proving Grounds apparently represent preliminary work for forthcoming experiments in big-scale explosions of nuclear fission and hydrogen fusion gadgets in the pacific. Apparently convincedMn the past two tests at Eniwetok" Atoll that a hydrogen explosion can be produced, the efforts of nuclear physicists now are directed at (a) stepping up the force of the explosion and (B) detonating the hydrogen bomb with more economy in the use .of fissionable material. To create the heat and pressure needed for triggering a hydrogen device something like a standard • atomic bomb explosion must be produced. Material-wise, this Is' costly. And there are reasons to believe that the present heat-pressure requirements for touching off a hydrogen explosion are greater than that which can be produced by a single atomic bomb. Dr. W. F. Libby of the University of Chicago, in a report Saturday to the American Physical Society here, said there was a big Increase in the atmosphere last November of the amount of tritium, a possible ingredient of H-bombs. He made no mention of H-bombs, but other scientists noted that the dates he cited coincided with atomic tests at Eniwetok. The atmosphere normally contains only very minute quantities of tritium, a form of hydrogen. Libby said that between Oct. 14 and Nov. 17, the amount in the air tripled, and then gradually went back to normal. He said such an increase could be caused by a period of drought. The Atomic Energy Commission a month ago made plain that Eni- wetok Atoll, used for big-scale tests since 1948, is too small for new tests. The ABC said it now will begin to use Bikini Atoll, locale for the 1946 tests against naval vessels. Use of Bikini, an abandoned and deserted atoll since the 1946 tests, is necessary to 'accommodate the rapidly expanding program of de veloping and testing new and 1m proved nuclear weapons." said the AEC. It added that Eniwetok will remain the headquarters and principal operating base for the Pacific Proving Grounds. Taken together, this suggested that Bikini, lacking the housing, laboratories, dock facilities and other permanent Installations of Eniwetok, may be used for super- explosions which could damage or destroy facilities at the latter atoll. Western Electric And Union Agree To New Contract NEW YORK agreement In contract negotiations including a wage increase, was announced here today' between the Western Electric Company and 16,500 CTO installation workers in 43 states. A company spokesman announced the terms of the settlement, reached after six weeks of negotiation. There was no immediate statement from the union, the CIO Communications Workers of America (CWA). Wage boosts ranging from 5 to 13 cents an hour are contained In the new one-year contract drawn up last night, the company spokesman said. He said that under the old contract, which expired HJarch 23, they earned from $1.13 to $2.45 an hour. Heavy Rain, Hail Hit Louisiana NEW ORLEANS W)—Two drown- Ings and an estimated crop damage of Hi million dolors are counted in the wake of heavy rain, wind and hail in Southeast Louisiana, principally In the Baton Rouge area. The dead: Mrs. Edna Boudreaux, 85, and her 6-year-old grandson, Jack Boudreaux, who were swept away yesterday In their car by the floodwaters of Ward's Creek, six miles south of Baton Rouge, Thunderstorms poured S.S inches of rain on the Baton Rouge area. Almost 100 persons were rescued by boat as water in some residential areas rose to a depth of six feet. Empress, an Indian elephant, served on both sides during the Civil War. Both the South and North used her for hauling supplies at Nashville, Tenn. PAGE SEVEN By RICHARD KLEINER NBA Staff Correspondent NEW YORK — (NBA)-Percy Faith feels a trend coming on. He should know; he helped start it. Tills particular trend (Trend No. 16 in the record business this year) is the "Big Orchestral Interpretation" trend. Faith's part in it was a record called "The Song From 'Moulin Rouge,' " which made so much dough the Moulin is out of the Rouge, Coming up next~lT~a""klng-_ Big Orchestral Interpretatio Faith, the east coast music dire tor for Columbia, has recorded tr Background music of a new flln 'Return to Paradise." As an Simo vatlon, it's in two parts, and w re on both sides of the record. H thinks it will go; you might sa he has Faith in it. As a by-product, he says th double-header platter means there no worries about which is th 'A" side and which the "B." DICK'S PICKS- TOP SINGLES: Two new voices worth hearing are Bob Whalen (RCA-Vlctor) doing "Is It Any Wonder" and Bob Santa Maria (MGM) on "You're Mine, My Love"; old favorites with new hits are Jo Stafford (Columbia) with "Just Another Polka"; June Christy (Capitol) doing "Great Scot"; Tommy Edwards end Hank Williams (MGM) who each recorded "Take These Chains From My Heart"; Rosemary Clooney and Marlene Dietrich (Columbia) with a fine duet called "Dot's Nice—Donna Fight!" and Hay Anthony (Capitol) with "The Hokey Pokey. " POP ALBUMS: Lion Records are out with four more of their "Designed for Dancing" series. These have orchestras led by Ramon Argueso, Billy Barrett, Shcp Fields and Teddy Powell in albums of mambos, square dances, pops and all-time hits, respectively. The last has 20 songs, dreamy and danceable. CLASSICAL: Rlmski - Korsakov's Scheherazade, Op. 35 (Leopold Stokowski and the Philharmonic Orchestra of London, RCA-Victor), is an exciting version of an exciting piece; Helen Traubel Sings Folk Songs and Ballads (RCA-Victor) has Miss Traubel' warm, full tones and appealing t songs, including favorites like, "Greensleeves" and 'Come Back to Sorrento." ONLY THE BEST li Goodfnough far Raw Attunl! feu* ST.JOSEPH ASPIRIN FOR CHILDREN WORLD'S IAMBT fflll* A5F1HN KDI QflLMN a FARMERS Bank SAFE DEPOIST BOX PROTECTS You Against and NOW AVAILABLE! In an effort to meet the needs of the people in BIytheville and the surrounding area, your Farmers Bank & Trust Co. has installed the largest and most modern Safe Deposit Box service between St. Louis and Memphis. Yes, over 800 modern Safe Deposit Boxes have been installed in our big vault! They are now available in three sizes, so come in real soon and order the size you want. Orders are coming In fast ... be sure you get yours in. You'll be surprised at the low rental charge! THE FARMERS BANK' ™ ST COMPANY ' The Oldest Bank In Mississippi County "TIME TRIED — PANIC TESTED" F.I).I.C.-llO,Ofl« r.ch Depot!! Mcmlwr Fedrra! Kr*rrvr System i "Of course," said the executlvc- I arranger - composer - conductor- golfer, "We really don't make 'A' or 'B' sides any more. We have two strong sides—the one we like most may flop." And, even' in these days of unbreakable records, a flop is undesirable, • • • Pity poor Dennis Day v The RCA- Victor tenor has four children— which Is not why he needs pity— and they like to hear Daddy sing. OK, figured Dennis, a flgurer as well as voice-conserver, I'll let them play my records. The kids would have none of that. They turned thumbs down—eight thumbs. Canned music, they said, is OK for other kids, but not for the children of a well-voiced father. So Dennis sings his lullabies in person. * * * THE POPULAR SIDE: Worried Columbia has waxed many Jimmy Boyd records, to be released from time to time. There's even a Christmas song for next year already finished. They're afraid his voice will change any minute. . . . Why are country songs popular? Here's the explanation of Sunshine Sue Workman, CBS and Mars Records star: "There's so much conflict and confusion in the world, and our kind of music is so simple, soothing, reassuring, direct, that people just can't seem to do without it any more." ON THE CLASSICS: For the first World Health Organization Reports Drop in Tuberculosis GENEVA, Switzerland M—The I (lie disease, which ranks with " " ' ' ' cancer and heart disease In its clciulliiiess. "no longer represents U. N. World Health Organization (WHO) reports a 50 per cent drop since the war lu Hie death rate from tuberculosis of the respiratory system—one of the major killers of mankind. A report issued last night said Ime in its 17-year history, the Boston Symphony Orchestra will make a transcontinental tour. Conducted by Charles Munch and Pierre Monteux, the RCA-Victor recording unit will play concerts in 26 cities, including Detroit, Atlanta. New Orleans, Dallas, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Toronto and Montreal. the aspect of a social scourge." The report stUd (he "extraordinary" cut in the tuberculosis death rate—"one of Ihe most sensational developments ever recorded in the field of public health"—was due to: 1. Energetic mass action for the early detection of tile disease through X-rays and other tests. 2. Prevention through BCG vaccination. 3. Control of such foodstuffs as milk. 4. Improved medical facilities due to the development of collec- ANN PINKHAM' reporti doctors' findings on What every girl should know about sickening MONTHLY CRAMPS! T«itt show they tan gtlen ba stopped — even the very first dayl Here's wonderful news for women and girls who suffer the tovtuvra of "bad dnys" of functionally- caused menstrual pain — headaches, backaches and those "no- good," draggcd-out feelings. It's news about a medicine — famous for relieving such suffering . . . even on the very first, worst day of your period! HOW IT WORKS: Pinklmm's acnefl- ciaL action includes a quieting effect ^ kou contractions I tJiat may cause 9 "periodic" pahis. In doctors'tests. Lydla E. Pinkham's Vcgeuible Compound gave complete or striking relief of such distress ... in 3 out of 4 cnsesl I.ydia Pinkham's 13 scientifically mailcrn In action! That's no sur- S rlse to the thousands to whom it us brought thrilling relief! So — starb today taking Lydla PiHfchnm's. See if you, too. don't en- Joy the same relief! Get, Lydla Pink- nnm s Compound or new. improved convenient Tablets (with added iron). Both are wonderful, too. for relieving "hot flushes" and other functional distress of change of life. live Insurance. 5. Recent progress In treatment methods. By 1950, the report said, the death rate from the disease had dropped to 32 per cent of the prewar level In Sweden, 40 per cent in Norway, W per cent in Denmark, 49 per cent in Switzerland, 62 per cent in Prance, 53 per cent in United States ana 59 per cent in Britain. It added that in the 21 countries publishing reliable statistics, more than 430,000 persons alive . today would have died of tuberculosis if the average prewar death rate had remained unchanged. The Perfect Gift May 10 CHOCOLATES ejjette-lfffrf) h the Trade Mark «/ (hi World's Flnett Cantfitt Mother's Day SPECIAL! Reoular 39 95 Platform Rocker Priced for This Week NO MONEY PAY ONLY 1.25 A WEEK WADE FURNITURE CO. "Trade with Wade & Save" 122 W. Main BIytheville

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