Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on October 15, 1899 · 17
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 17

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Sunday, October 15, 1899
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SPORTING., NEW YORK FIGHT GOSSIP. I. OILER TELLS OP trim B191 prifiGHTA-ND OTHERS TO COME. alefereo Thinks a Postponement la Likely and That There Will Be a 1 War of Words in Any Event - The Sailor" to Go on an. Exhibition Tour for Big Money If Ile Wfhs.. Interesting Features of Reeent Battles. BY GEORGE SILER. NOW York, Oct. 14.SpeciallThe big eght scheduled to take place at Coney Island on Friday, Oct. 27, may be postponed. Brady Insists that the injury to Jeffries' arm. received yesterday, has disabled the fighter, and after the accident set out to find O'Rourke, who had gone to Philadelphia with George Dixon. Brady would reither trust the affair to a telephone nor the Western Union, so sent Joe Macias, O'Rourke's secretary. to Philadelphia to break the news as gently as possible. O'Rourke returned from the Quaker city this morning and went direct to Sharkers quarters to talk the matter over. lie returned to the city about I? o'clock tonight and I saw him about half an hour later and asked him what he intended to do about the matter. " Make him fight on the 27th, of course. Sharkey sprained his ankle, cut his foot. stepped on a piece of glass, which required four stitches, and today Armstrong cut a gash over his left eye; and we'll be ready. When Sharkey fought Jeffries in San Francisco he had a lame back, but they would ,not listen to a postponement then., and We will ce now." O'Rourke and Brady had not met up to this writing. but are liable to before midnight, and I look for a merry war of words. If Brady insiats upon a postponement-I do not know what there is left for O'Rourke to do. He can, of course. claim the $1,000 forfeit, but that would hardly cover training expenses. Furthermore, everything looks trosy for an immense house, and the photographers claim they have everything perfected to take the pictures of the fight, which also means a pile of money. O'Rourke is aware of this and he may weaken to Brady's 'arguments. I was informed today that the -photographers have arranged to place enough arc lights over the ring to cover its entire twenty-four feet. These ought to Make it as light as midday. George Dixon was matched today to fight 'Young Whistler in Baltimore a week after his fight with Will Curley. and with Eddie Lenny in this city a week later. Brady will divorce himself from all small fights and fighters after the Jeffries and Sharkey championship battle. Brady, it will be remembered. contracted with a half-dozen English fighters. with liberal guarantee, and those that have contestedviz.: Dobbs, Craig, and Jordanhave from a ;financial standpoint been failures. Jordan and Santry were to have battled at Coney Island, but Tom O'Rourke, who had a verbal contract with Santry to meet Oscar Gardner at the Lenox club, explained matters regarding Santry and Gardner to the Coney Island officials, and secured the contest for his club. Jordan had $2,500 guarantee, win or lose, while Santry fought for 05 and 35 per cent of a $2,000 purse. The receipts of the fight hovered around the $3.000 mark. and as Santry received $1,300 for his share and Jordan $2.500 for his, the promoters, that is, Coney Island and Lenox club folks. including other expenses pertaining to the night's Vilort lost over $1,200, Santry's victory adding $600 to that amount The day previous to the Santry-Jordan fight Brady offered a $5,000 purse for the , Frank Erne-Jack O'Brien lightweight cham- splonship battle. which good judges of the eame tigured was far too high. Brady tried to get O'Rourke interested in the contest, but Tom said be would not touch it at that price. Bill then thought he had put his foot in it again, and concluded to keep his hands off of small fights and fighters. The articles for the Erne-O'Brien fight call for the contest to fake place at Coney Island Oct. 26, the night before the date set for the Jeffries-Sharkey fight It is doubtful, however, whether the ConelaIsland club will be able to pull it off on that night A short time ago the officials of the three big clubs, the Coney Island, Broadway, and the Lenox, agreed not to clash in dates. Announcements were then made that Oscar Gardner and Ben Jordan and George Dixon and Will Curley would meet on Oct. 25 and 26 respectively. At that time it was considered a foregone conclusion that Jordan would defeat Santry, but as the latter turned the tables on the Englishman the Gardner-Jordan match had to be declared off. The Dixon-Curley date, however, still holds good, but it was hinted last night that a movement was on foot to make the Dixon-Curley fight a curtain-raiser to the Jeffries-Sharkey contest. A meeting of those interested was held this evening, when the idea of a curtain-raiser to the big fight was tabooed. O'Brien and Erne will, therefore, have to fight Oct. 25, the date left open by the falling through of the Gardner-Jordan match. Brady is a hustler from way back, and there is no getting away from that. It's a Well-known fact that he is Champion Jeffries manager-fa-Ltd that he thinks Jim will defeat Sharkey. There is a lot of uncertainties in pugilism as in other matters, and Brady, knowing this has contracted with O'Rourke to show Sharkey, should he win from Jeffries, for six weeks at a salary of ;1,000 a week. I called on Tom Sharkey at Newdorp, S. the other day and found him working like a Trojan and looking in excellent conditicn. It is needless to give a detailed account of his daily work. Suffice it to say that he is at it morning and afternoon. I saw him punch the ball and box six rounds with big Bob Armstrong. Tom wallops the ball as bard as anybody and showed some speed in boxing. He did not cut loose at Bob as hard e-s he generally does because there were too many " Peeping Toms " around. Armstrong has improved wonderfully in boxing. and those that have seen him at his best ith Sharkey say if he would go at others as e does at Tom he could defeat any of the beaveweights. Sharkey is confident of win-Mlle and says the fight won't go the limits. Clarence Forbes, who is matched with BurrY Ware of England; George Connolly. E.tiche Connolly, who fights Matty Mathews; t' " Lavigne, and Frank McConnell. the do Welterweight, weerweight, are all in the Shar- kIf e , y cam p and working as hard as the sailor. L'itvigne. while a bit down in the mouth on count of his defeat at the hands of George McFadden, is still eager for the fray, so to Itr)ofeale " I only got what I gave a number others, and that is all there is to it," he aYs. Lavigne is matched to fight Dal Haw- kins of California. The important fistic event of the week was that between Bea Jordan, champion of England, and Eddie Santry, which the latter Von in the sixteenth round. The articles of agreement called for 122 pounds. give or take two and there is no doubt that JordatAad the advantage over Eddie from three to four pounds. Santry told me he el ghed but 120 pounds when he left Chicago on Friday. Oct. 6. He arrived here on Sattrday evening, Oct. 7, and the following zooming weighed 130, and that after taking a Turkish bath. This worried him somewhat, and he immediately set to work to pull oft the superfluous flesh. He overdid it; however, as when he came to town on Mon-dal, night he weighed but 119 pounds. The by vrere then weighed in at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. and Santry CPPed the beam in his undershirt at 122. while Jordan just made 124. Jordan. who Is a stockily built young fellow, was considerably stronger that Eddie, and showed It in the clinches, in all of which he handled Santry easily. The Englishman, who. on the strength of defeating George Dixon was considereda sure winner at post time, so to speak, was a 1 to 2 favorite. and at this Price considerable money changed hands. The backers of Jordan, however, felt a bit uneasy in the first few rounds, as Eddie easily avoided Benz rushes and did not forget to Delver him strongly. In the opening Mind. after slipping away from a rush, he! nailed Jordan bard and almost had the fight won. as the latter was just turning into 4 Queer street." Santry held back, however. and when the gong sounded denoting the end of the round Jordan had recovered somewhat. The latter continued his rushing tactics during the first half-dozen rounds. and although he landed hard and often he received as good as he sent. Seeing he was going on the wrong tack, he changed his style and contented himself with jabbing his left to the face and occasionally planting his right to the body. By Using these tactics he outpointed Santry and at the end of the fifteenth round held a fair winning margin. Eddie went in to do or die in the sixteenth and rushed Ben into a corner where rapid exchanges followed. During the fusillade Santry. after avoiding a swinging left. hooked his right Over on Jordan's jaw and followed it with a straight left that reached the pit of Ben's stomach. The latter reeled into a clinch, hung on a few seconds, and then fell on his back, bringing Santry down. with him. where he laid until counted out. It is difficult to say which of the two blows did the business. I think it was the body blow, as Jordan when being counted out worked his hands over his stomach, indicating the seat of his trouble. Had the blow on the jaw been the cause of the knockout he would have been unconscious, and therefore unable to indicate by any movement of the hands as to where he had been hit. Eddie came out of the scrimmage with a big lump under his right eye and a few aches on his body. Jordan was also bruised up. and when seen after the contest and asked as to how he felt, said: "ll'im hall broke h'up. This will break the guvnr's 'eart." Immediately after the contest Sam Poo ler, Santry's manager, matched the latter against Oscar Gardner to fight on Nov. 14. Jack Moffatt could not get on with anybody. but will probably be matched to fight the winner of the Joe Gardner-Jimmy Handler fight, which takes place at the Hercules club next Monday night " Mysterious " Billy Smith was willing to meet Jack, but Tom O'Rourke had his eye on Charlie McKeever for Smith and matched them last Thursday to fight at the Broadway on Nov. 7. " Spike " Sullivan had an easy time of it defeating Jimmy Murray of Cincinnati at the Hercules club last Thursday night. The Westerner made a fair showing during the first three rounds. but after that did not have a ghost of a chance, as the fighting Irishman battered him all over the ring and won hands down in the sixth round. " KM " McPartland received a decision over Owen Zeigler at the Broadway club at the end of twenty-five rounds. The " Kid had all the best of the milling during the first ten rounds, but Owen got down to work after that and more than held his own to the end. Referee Johnny White's decision was loudly hooted and hissed at. Zeigler put up a game fight and had the " Kid " in distress several times. He had him going in the last round and McPartland's seconds threw -water on him to keep him refreshed to the end. The regulars said it was the worst decision seen here in a long time. Dan Creedon and Pat Ready fight at the Broadway club next Tuesday night. Ready was defeated by Harry Peppers at the C. AA. last winter, and Creedon, if any good at all, ought to win easily. I attended a stag given by the " White Mice association on the East Side " (Germany) last Thursday night and witnessed a boxing match, with a fake knockout thrown in, by a pair of German boxers. The maater of ceremonies, a fat German. introduced the boxers as follows: Shentman: It gifts me blesher in invit you tr see der fite here ternight by Mr. Hen-fly Stuphnoodle and Mr. Shakey Wunderlich. der life bunching pall." After a give-and-take affair of three rounds Wunderlich made the following announcement: " Shents: I'll now manage ter gife yer er imitation to er fake knockout or how er man gits bunched before he gits knocked out." Then Stuphnoodle sailed into 'Wunderlich, knocked him three times, the latter staggering to his feet after being down a few seconds. The third time he arose Stuphnoodle cracked him on the jaw and he went down for the limit. He was loudly cheered when he arose and had free beer for the balance of the night HARVARD SCORES AT WEST POINT. Crimson Players Beat the Cadets by- a Score of 18 to O. West Point. N. Y., Oct 14.--Special-- Harvard defeated the cadets by a score of 18 to 0 in a hard fought game on the parade grounds this afternoon. The crimson players were in good form, but the unexpected strength shown by the cadets resulted In a comparatively small score for the visitors. During the first minutes of the first half It looked as though Harvard would have a 'walkover, but the soldiers soon pulled themselves together and put up as pretty a game as ever was played on the West Point gridiron. Bettison stood like a stone wall against Harvard's onslaught, and the crimson fighters soon stopped paying him attention, and tried Farnsworth. They were more successful in that quarter. The plebe stood the hammering of the whole Harvard line for some time. but the continued onslaught weakened him,. and it was through him and. Smith that all gains were made by Harvard. In the second half the crimson players fought hard to increase their score, but the cadets played as a unit and bravely held them down. to another touchdown. Gierash had, a great opportunity for a goal from the field, but the ball sailed outside the post and a groan went up from the Harvard rooters. Lineup: West Point. Harvard. Smith L. E. Icampbell L. E. Farnsworth L.. T. Swain. ... .. T. Goodspeed L.. G. A. R. Sargent L. G. Betti son C C. Sargent Hopkins R. G. Burden R. G. Bunker R. T. J. Lawrence R. T. Keller R E. Hallowell R. E. Lahm Q B. Daly Q. B. Rockwell L H. B. Swain L. H. B. Glade R. H. B. Warren R. H. B. Ennis 1' B. Kendall F B. UnipireMoyles RefereeLangford. TimekeeperCadet Adams. ELEVEN POINTS FOR. PRINCETON. Columbia Makes a Good &bowing Against the Tigers.. t BY HARRY BEECHER. New York. Oct. 14.fSpeciaLlColumbla made Its initial bow in football togs this afternoon at Manhattan Field. and while the result favored its Opponents. it was by no means disgraced when it Is taken into consideration that Princeton was the opposing team. Columbia was on the debt side of the account for eleven points, and there are a great many other colleges that would envy Columbia the result of this struggle. It is too early yet in the season for feet, snappy play. and the game as a whole showed a listless movement. as if the heat took all the steam out of energetic play. A fair sprinkling of supporters from each college was present. and here and there a watchful spy from New Haven. who was attempting to get a line on the Tigers' style. It was a peaceful struggle. free from any slugging, with only a few injuries. and. with the exception of a side line row. free from any unusual excitement. Princeton showed itself to be strong in the kicking department, and its full back. Wheeler. Practically kicked his side to victory. The Tigers' rush line was slow and loggy, due to a surp h lus weight and hot weather. The half backs lacked snap and dash. and were generally downed with little gain. Columbia had good defense, and worked tackle plays with considerable vim. but was sadly deficient in punting, losing on the average ten yards to every exchange. Columbia's fumbling was also a noticeable weakness, and gave little Poe another chance to sneak the ball for a run of forty-odd yards. It was the most sensational play of the game. It was after Princeton had returned a kick from the fifty-yard line that the moat exciting play of the game occurred. Denman grabbed the ball at Oolumbla's forty-five-yard line. coiumbia's back Plugged into the line at center. He was firmly tackled. and the bunch of men finally fell squirming to the ground. Out of the scrimmage rose the ball, and Poe, who seems to know when such things are going to happen. picked it up like a flaeh. and legged away for forty yards to a touchdown. It bappened before Columbia realized the situation. No one was in front of it, and it seemed the easiest kind of a. thing to doif you know bow. It was a similar play to that he made in the Yale game last falL Wheeler kkked an easy goal. - Columbia- Position. Princeton. Position. Slocovitch. Neid- Paltrier. Beardsley.L. E. linger ..R. Es McCord T. la Smythe. Beandeley.R. T. Edwards G. .C. Lorigacre. Bruce...R. G. Booth C Mika. Dana-- """ "" RBI GT. Wright ., Miller L. G. Lloyd Knapp, E. Putnam IB'')uerke e 'it(1-B. L. FL B. Wilson Q B. Levick LJoanreernDenynan...L.B....ILHF: Bc3It..II,Rvehiteeer,e. B. 13. I ScorePrinceton, 11: Columbia. 0 Referee-- Lehigi, Longford. Trinity. UmpireDashiell. lainestrienliendricksola. 5.11210 snialltes taxa, - - BADGERS' EASY VICTORY. DEFEAT NORTHWESTERN ELEVEN BY AN OVERWHELMING SCORE. - Wise WAIL Team, However, Proves Weak in Defensive Work-O'Dea Gives. Another Remarkable Exhibi lion of Kicking-Peel. Gains Most of the Ground for the Cardinal, the Evanaton. Enda Reinw-Weak-Tvro Goal. from the Field Registered. Madison, Wis., Oct- 14.--tSpecdallWisconsin ran up against a. little stiffer proposition than it had counted upon this afternoon in the Northwestern game and for a OCTOBER 15, 1899-SIXTY- PAGES. time it looked as though its goal might be crossed. The fmal score of SS to 0 was made Only by the wonderful punting of Captain O'Dea, supported by what Everts Wrenn characterized as great end work. On every punt two or three of the team were ready to down in his tracks whoever caught the ball. Twice the lanky Australian sent the pigskin whirleg through the air for sixty yards, to which fumbling by the Northwestern backs at one time added ten.. Twice, too, he sent the ball squarely between the goal poste. No less remarkable than. O'Deaes 'work was thaz of Pee le. He carried the bell close to MO yards, making- five touchdowns in all. The ball was probably in his hands half of the time when in Wisconsin's paosession and repeatedly he picked his way around the end and through openings in the line for gains of ten and fifteen yards. The great surprise of the day was when Northwestern sprung the old Pennsylvania, tandem play on tackle. Sterting in the middle of the field it pushed the ball steadily down towards the goal, while the Badgers did not seem to know what to make of it. With the ball on Wisconsinal twenty-five-yard line the purple made the mistake of trying to repeat the performance of the cardinal Captain and score a goal from the field. A poor pass from center gave the Badger ends an opportunity to get in and block it, thus epoiling Northwestern's cmy. chance in the game of scoring. If Northwestern had continued to pound away welt its tandem play itedould probably have advanced the ball some distance before the Badgers learned how to stop itpossibly for a touchdown. In working this play Captain Little was almost a team In himself. Several times he broke through the line for five yards or better and all through the game he was the life of the team. Badger Defense Disappointing. Wisconsin's defense was a disappointment, and the Northwestern players all unite in saying unless it is greatly Improved in the next week 'Yale will push the Badgers all over the field. The one bright feature of the game was the way in which the punts were sent off and covered. Captain O'Dea's high twisters gave the ends plenty of time to get down the field, and when the ball came down Cochems. Juneau, and Blair or Curtis were waiting to down the runner. Northwestern, on the other hand, seemed unable to get Its kicks off. Half the time they were blocked, or else Machesney, who did the punting for the purple, was tackled for a loss. Once when Wisconsin punted the ball out from its twenty-five-yard line Captain O'Dea tried his new twister, which goes high and then comes down almost In direct perpendicular. It was a puzzler for the Methodists and the Badgers got it on a fumble. Northwestern. was weak at end, and not only did the Badger backs repeatedly circle them for good gains, but punts were run. back again and again for considerable distances. Three thousand spectators were on Randall Field at 3 o'clock when the game was called. The Evanston aggregation trotted on the field first, and went through a few formations. Northwestern kicked off to Cochems, who returned It to Wisconsin's twenty-yard line. O'Dea. immediately went back for a punt. and sent the ball to the middle of the field. Northwestern started in with some straight line bucks by Pierce, and made its first down, but lost the ball on an, offside play. Peele was given the ball, and went around right end for fifteen yards. Five yards on an offside play by Northwestern took the ball up in the neighborhood , of the Evanston goal. Blair and Jolliffe together advanced the ball five yards. Poole made a nice run around end. The ball was then en Northwestern's twenty-five-Yard line, and O'Dea kicked an easy goal from the field, four minutes after play started. O'Dea's Pine Kicking. , O'Dea caught' Northwestern's kickoff and brought it back twenty yards. A punt gave -the Methodists the ball on their 50-yard line. Being unable to gain, McChesney punted to the Badgers' 35-yard line. Five yards on an offside play, ten yards by Peele, and four by Blair followed in quick succession. Peeie then went around the end for one of the big runs of the day, crossing five white lines before being downed. A quarter, back pass neded five yards. After another five-yard gain by Jolliffe Peele went around for a touchdown. O'Dea kicked goal, making the score 11 to O. Northwestern kicked out of bounds at Wisconsin's 20-yard line. O'Dea. punted to the center of the field. The Evanston men were unable to make their distance and kicked. O'Dea returned with a sixty-yard punt. Northwestern kicked again to Wilmarth, who returned ten. yards to North-western's 50-yard line. Peele made six yards around end. Blair tried Little, but made no gain. Van Hart got the ball on a fumble by Wisconsin. The purple started in on its tandem play on tackle. The ball was pushed steadily down the field until it was on Wisconsin's twenty-five yard line and it looked like a touchdown for the Methodists. A place kick was called for and the crowd realizing the danger of a score began to yell " Hold 'em Wisconsin." A poor pass by Ryden gave the Badger ends time to get in and block the attempt.. O'Dea at once went back for a punt. The purple backs miscalculated their distance, so that the ball when over them and before they could pick it up was on their ten yard line. The tandem play was called into requisition again and netted ten yards before the Badgers could stop IL McChesney then kicked to Peele, who returned the ball to the visitors' forty yard line. Peale, Joliffe, and Blair rushed the ball quickly down the field for a touchdown. O'Dea missed the goal, leaving the score 16 to O. Northwestern kicked off to Peele. O'Dea punted to Northwestern's fifty yard line. The visitors were unable to gain and were forced' to try a kick. This was bloeked, Curtis getting the ball on the twenty-five yard line. Time called. Scoring Become. Easier-Rodgers was put in at center by Wisconsin In the second half, and A. Chamberlain taken. back to right half, The Badgers took a, big brace, and did not allow the visitors to make any gains of importance. Wisconsin kicked eft to Woolbert, who was down on the ten-yard line. Machesney kicked out of bounds on the thirty-yard line. The Badgers pushed the ball down the field for ten yards, then O'Dea kicked a goal from the field. Score, 21 to O. Several Interchanges of punts followed, in which Wisconsin came out ahead. With the ball on the visitors twenty-yard line Pee le went through between Lerum and Blair for a twenty-yard run for a touchdown. Score, 20 to O. More punting followed . until a place kick by Northwestern was blocked by Blair, resulting in a loss of twenty yards. Another blocked kick cost them ten yards more. Pee le and Chamberlain quickly pushed the ball down to the visitors' goal, and Pee le went through for a touchdown. Northwestern began to show the effects of the hard game, and several substitutes went In. Wisconsin In the few minutes left to play worked the ball down the field for an PROTECTED CRUISER OF THE GRIDIRON. (Adapted from the New York Journal other score on good straight football. O'Dea kicked goal. Score 38 to O. The lineup: Wisconsin. Northwestern. Cochems .1... E. 117anhart R. D. Blair L. T. I Little R T. R. Chamberlain..-I.. G. I Dietz. Lawler R. G. A. Chamberlain. Rodg-;Ryden C CT'S C !.1. Johnson L. G. Lerum ....- ..... .It. G.INVarti .L. T. Curtis -It. T.;Elliott. Campbell-L. E. Juneau .. T . - - .. R. E. ilklochesney Q B. Wilmarth. rott. . . .0. R. I West ... . . ... ..R. IL R. Pee'.e 1,. IL B. I Pierce --.P ,...1, 11- B. Jolliffe. A. Cham- Woolbert.inneo..F. B. berlain .R. H. D. - O'Dea I' B.- Score--Wisconsin. 38; Northwestern. O. Touchdowns-Peele. 5. Goals fmm tieid-ODea. 2. Gno,'.s--0'Dea, 3. tmpire-E. Wrenn. Referee-Darby. Linesmen--Amierson. Campbell. Time of ha1ves-25 minutes. IIA.INOIS IS BEATEN BY INDIANA. Team at Champaign Plays Another Disappointing Game. Champaign. IlL Oct. 14.epeelal.1--By alti,ost a repetition of the Notre Dame game one year ago. Illinois was defeated by another Hoosier. team this afternoons the score being 5 to O. The one touchdown was made In the second half on a sort of a fluke play by Foster. Indiana's quarterback. who secured the ball in a general mixup and ran sixty yards through an open field almost unseen. The victors were a husky lot of players. their line being especially heavy and strong . and the Whole team played good football from start to finish. Illinois in straight football undoubtedly outplayed its bulky and luckier opponents, and at no time. aside from the one ecore. allowed Indiana to approach nearer than thirty or forty yards to the goal line. During about three-quarters of the game the home team did not attempt to rush the ball In the least, but kicked as soon as it secured PO.SSeS. Si 0 111. and on the exchanges of 'Walls Johnston had a -Attlee the better of it. although Pike kicked well. As soon as Indiana had scored Illinois seemed to wake up, and by aggressive playing landed the ball on the Hoosiere seven-yard line just aa time was called. The work of Pike. Foeter. and Captain Hubbard. for the opponents. was of a first-class order. and they were responsible for neatey all the ground-gaining of their team which was chiefly made on a peettliar formation . similar to the old guards' back play. Illinois defeneive play in the first half was fine. but the men were penaLzed no lees than seven times for off-eideeeplays. which spoiled many of their best gains. ' The one run of Wadsworth on a double pass. the splendid bucking and defensive work of Johneton. the beautiful handling of punts by Lundgren. and the fine all-round work of Adeit were the feature of the Illinois' play. The last-named made one fine - run around the right end of thirty yards. but was unfortunate enough to fumble the ball when within eight yards of Indiana's goal line. The lineup: Illinois. Position. Notre Dame. Position. Martin and, Fre TIC ifi ILE. Ray L. E. Pollard and McCor- Neizer L. T. mick It T. Johnson and David-Briley ....... G. son L G. McLane C Hurley C. Clayton L G. Pike . H. G. Searil L. T. Barbour R. T. Actsit L E. Aydelotte II E. Wadsworth Q B. Foster Q. B. Lundgren H. B.IMcGovney,,..L. H. B. Cayou and Hall.L. H. B. Hawley R. H. B. Johnston F B. 1 Hubbard F B. Place and &ateChampaign. oet. Touchdown by Foster. RefereeFulton of nil-note. I:metreBrown. of Cornell Linesman l Illinois. iTime of halvesTwenty and A ce vatrtty-five lineIl e minutes. State University of Iowa, 35; Penn, O. Iowa City. Ia.. Oct. 14,--1Specia1:1Footbal7: state University of Iowa. 35; Penn College of Oskaloosa. 0- - . - Northwestern; A" 6; South Side A" O. Is a fiercely-fought game yesterday morning Northwestern Amderny defeated on Shepherd Fie Li the 5611a...1z Elide Acadvaar lut a scere ot to O INDIANS GET PENN SCALP. CARLISLE TIGIASI DEFEATS 'UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. Woodruff's Famous Eleven Is Beaten on Its Own Grounds by a. Score eel to ISGuards, Back Play Is Success.. fully Repubied and the Bed Men Effectually Outplay the Qua 'Dere in Most of the Departments of '..412se GameHudson's Clever Wicking.. Philadelphia, Pa-, Oct 14.--ISpecial.1 The Carlisle Indians defeated Penn today by the score of 16 to 5. The result was a complete surprise and supporters of the red and blue are crestfallen and dejected tonight. Penn's defeat was clean and decisive. 'The Indians won because they played a faster, more consistent kind of football. Pennsylvania lost by reason of a number of things, a weak line contributing more to the downfall than any other fault in the team. There Was no luck lying around loose on the gridiron today. There were no flukes, and what few fumbles happened brought no marked advantage to either team. The Indians played straight, old-fashioned football, with little use of tricks. Pennsylvania had recourse time and again to the redoubtable guards back formation and employed the double, pass frequently. But at only one period in the game did the guards back avail to any great extent. The redskins had been on the trail of that famous mass play for moons and they stopped It repeatedly. Again and again Penes guards plunged into the line, only to be dashed to pieces upon the Indians defense. Penn's ends were outplayed at every point, and it was through the tackles and ends the Indians found most of their openings. Coombs of Pennsylvania outpunted his opponent at every kick, but the advantage of his superior expenditure of leg muscle was lost by the slowness and inaccuracy of his ends in getting down the field. Pierce kicked with less precision over less ground. but the Indian ends were always in at the death and the Penn player who caught rarely advanced the ball before being downed. Penn Kick. Goal from Field. It was this same excellence carried too far on the part of the Indian ends which ree suited in Penn's only score. Pierce punted from his own 5-yard line. Kennedy caught but was toppled over by Sickles before the ball reached his hands. For this Penn received 15 yards and a free kick, and with this opportunity and at a difficult angle a goal from the field was tried successfully. The favorite ground gaining method of the Indians was to send the backs through between tackle and end, and the men with the ball seldom failed to find a hole. Both Gardiner at left end and Howell at right end found great difficulty in getting into the game. the Indian interference proving almost puncture proof. Hudson's work in the back field has never been surpassed on any gridiron. He fumbled but once, although the game was made up largely of exchanges of punts, and he often ran the ball back twenty yards or more. His specialty is kicking goals from the field, and his ability in this line was greatly feared by Penn backers. He missed an easy chance during the first half. On a second trial, from a greater distance, he sent the pigskin neatly whirling over the bar. Woodley replaced J. Gardner at quarter back, and Perin's team work improved. A new spirit seemed to enter the hearts of the dwoe ag gre de r s of ff etnhsei vree dp laanydi nbgl ua d The laeffttetrhtehi the Indians' line hard. The Indians went to or a r il y t haenmd over r gliukaer dts e n back tenpins. The Indians recovered from their demorali- zation on their own 5-yard line and held Pennsylvania from further gains. formation p i e ce t e m bowled p McCracken's work at guard suffered because of his unfit condition. Penes whole team showed the effects of the short practice season. The most prominent shortcoming of the team lay with the end e and tackles. The work of the center men was was lamentably weak, both in offensive and almost faultless, but the rest of the line defensive work. and the position of quarter back was equally in need of improvement. There was practically no wind when elle teams lined up for play. What little breeze there was was blowing right across the field, giving no advantage to either team. Captain Wheelock won the toss for the Indians and elected to defend the west goal. - Indians Hun the Ball Back. Hare kicked off for Pennsylvania, Wheelock caught the ball squarely in his arms on the twenty-yard line, and it was evident, from the start the Indians would make long gains on running back Penes kicks, as the end rushers were not within ten yards of the Indian Captain when he caught the ball. Wheelock ran it back ten yards before he was downed. Pierce fumbled on the next play, but Sickles saved the ball and Miller plunged through left tackle for a five-yard gain. He followed this up with another dash for three yards at the same point. but Seneca, who tried to force Penes cervter, was downed by Coombs without gain. Miller again worked left tackle for five yards and Pierce made a like number through the center. Seneca bucked the line for a six-yard gain, but fumbled the ball, and Howell fell on it for the red and blue. Penn then began a series of futile plunges against the Carlisle line. Coombs, Snover. and McCracken all tried to advance it,. but failed to gain. The redmen then started to rip Penn's line up in great shape, but their ground gaining was stopped by fumbles. Coorabs dashed through Carlisle's left tackle for twenty-two yards, the longest run of the game for Penn. He passed every one except Johnson., who brought him to the defense ground on the Indians' thirteen-yard line. With the geal in sight, Penn. tried to ham-mer e a way through the line. Coombs. Mc- cken .1 heandinaHiaanres wweerreealpluu ttriend; not them one of could gain against the stubborn the fourth -down a quarter back kick was tried to the right side of the line, with the result that Hudson secured the ball outside bounds on the Indians' ten-yard line. Seneca got around right end for two yards, and Captain Wheelock then decided to punt out of danger. , Madsen Dropkicks a. Goal. After trying in vain to push the ball over for a touchdown the Indians carried the ball un the field to the thirty-yard mark and the Hudson dropped back for a kick. As Hud- son dropped it the ball seeeee ground exactly on the thirty-four-yard mark, and his sure right foot lifted it over the bar for the first score. The teams had been playing just twenty minutes. Hare kicked off to Hudson on the Indians' fifteen-yard-line and the latter ran it back to the thirty-yard mark before he was downed. Pierce got through the center for five yards and Seneca made seven more at right tackle, Pierce's fumble onb the nest FOOTBALL SCORES, OCT. IL Chicago ' 17; Cornell, 6. Wisconsin, 38; Northwestern, O. Carlisle Indians, 16; Pennsylvania, 5 Harvard; 18; .West Point, O. Princeton, 11; Columbia, O. Xichigan, 17; Western Reserve, O. Indiana, 5; Illinois, 0- Yale 12; Dartmouth, O. Oberlin, 12; Purdue, O. play lost the ball to Pennsylvania, but the Quakers were unable to advance it and Coombs kicked out of bounds to the Indians' twenty-yard line. It was brought in and Wheelock punted- to midfield, where Scholder stopped Kennedy without gain. Snover was thrown back on a center plunge and McCracken took the ball on a double pa, which also resulted in a loss. Coombs again punted and Overfield got the ball at the Indians' thirty-yard line on a fumble by Johnson. Hare and Kennedy were unable to gain. and with but a few seconds to play Coombs tried for a field goal from the forty-yard line. It was a weak effort, the ball falling ten yards short of the bar, where Hudson got it and ran it back to the twenty-yard line just as time was called. Pennsylvania had not lost all hope. It had been clearly outplayed by the Indians in the matter of ground-gaining, but the Quakers had really taken the ball closer to the goal line. There was no change in the teams when they again came on the field. The first part of this half was chiefly devoted to punting. Then Hare created the little enthusiasm for the red and blue by plunging through center for eight yards, but Snover and Zimmerman could not gain, and Coombs was again forced to punt. - Hudson got the ball on the Indians' thirty-yard line and ran It back ten yards before Overfleld brought him down. Pierce went through right tackle for four, and Johnson skirted left end behind strong Interference for ten more. It was now on Pennsylvania's forty-yard line, and Pierce took it ten yards nearer the Quaker goal. On a center plunge Johnson followed It with an eight-yard gain through left tackle. Penn Tries a, New Quarter. At this point Woodley came on at quarter back on the Pennsylvania team. Coombs, who had been badly used up early in the half. went out of the game, and J. Gardiner went on at right half . back, while Reugenburg was moved to full. Stehl was also substituted at right tackle instead of SnoVer, and Oglesby took W. Gardiner's place at left half. Johnson went through right tackle for five yards, and center plunges of Pierce and Seneca took the ball within ten yards of the Quaker goal-- With the line in sight nothing could check the advance of the red men. Johnson crashed through left tackle for four yards,- and then big Pierce hurled himself against the center. The two teams piled up in a great heap. but when they were untangled It was found the Pierce was stretched across the line and the Indians had scored a touchdown, ten minutes after play had begun In the second half. Wheelock kicked the goal, and the score was: Carlisle, 11; Pennsylvarda, - McCloskey now came on In place of Over-field at center. It was at this stage of the game that the Quakers showed anything like their old-time ability to gain ground. Hare and MceraCkex-In-tera.plowed their way through- tharindkinr:11115'fo-ciains of three and four yards each, and the ball was taken on short, steady plunges to the Indians' five-yard line. It was then passed to McCracken. who tried to circle the left end. No one avas helping-Lim tinthe interference, and as Rogers came tearing through McCracken dropped the ball, Scholder falling on It for Carlisle. Whe:t1411en 2111....tuazicazalt edy at the 55-3rar - o was- tackled by Seckles when attempting to make a fair catch. There was a long powwow between the opposing Captains and the officials, with the result that Pennsylvania was given a fair catch and fifteen yards for the foul tackle. This took the ball to the Indians' 20-yard line, where Pennsylvania decided to try for a goal from place kick. The angle was a most difficult one, but with-1. Gardiner holding the ball-Ilare kicked a pretty goal, making Pennsylvania's score of the game. Quakers Try to Tie. But five minutes remained to play, and all the Quakers could hope for was a tie, end small chance of that. Wheelock kicked off to Hare on Pennsylvania's fifteen-yard line, who ran it back twenty before he was brought down by Sickles. McCracken lost three yards on attempt to buck the center, and Reugenburg kicked to Hudson at midfield. Kennedy was hurt, and Smith was substituted at left half back. On the next play Johnson got around left end for fifteen yards, clearing everybody but Woodley, who finally brought him down. - - Pennsylvania was given the ball for holding, and McCracken got through center for six yards, but Zimmerman fumbled and the Indians secured the ball. Seneca then dashed through right tackle for a beautiful run of forty yards, Woodley finally bringing him down. Pierce made five more through center, and In the next. play Johnson took it over for another touchdown. Reugenburg blocked Wheelock's try for goal. and the score was: Carlisle, 16; Pennsylvania, 5. Hare kicked off to Hudson on the fifteen-yard line, and the Indian quarter back ran It back to the thirty-yard mark. Time was called, with Carlisle In possession of the ball on Its own thirty-five-yard line. The lineup: Pennsylvania. Position. Indians. Position. NV. Gardiner, Ogles- Rogers . E. by L. E. NN'heelocit L. T. Zimmerman L. T. Scott L. G. Hare L. G. Smith - Overfield. MeCloskey..C. Redwater .R. G. 1.1cerackn R C. Warner, Scholder..R. T. Snover. Stehl R. T. Sickles R. E. Howell R. E.iltudson Q B J. Gardiner. Woodley 'Seneca L H. B. Q B. Johnson. Miller-R. H. B. 7Cennedy, Smith.L H. B. Pierce P. B. Reugenburg. Gardner . ... R. H. B. Coombs, keugenburg 15: Pennsylvania. 5. TouchdownsPierce, 1: Johnson. 1. Goal from touchdownWheelock. Goal from fieldHudson. Goal from place kickHare. UmpireW. H. Lewis. Harvard. RefereeW. H. Corbin.. Yale. TimekeepersProfessor George Heekman. Dickinson: J. H. Minds. Pennsylvania. LinesmenWilliam Being. Carlisle: Hodge. Pennsylvania. Time of halves-25 minutes each. Knox, 6; Grinnell, 5. Galesburg, Ill.. Oct. 14.(SpeciallAfter a close and exciting contest Knox College eleven won the football gams with Grinnell's team this afternoon 6 to 5. Much feeling was aroused among the spectators by the Grinnell men's slugging. Bell's thirty-five yard run and touchdown as a brilliant feature. The lineup: Knox. Grinnell. Lathe R. E' 'Lyman L. E. Smith R. T. Test L. T. Braden ... ..... ..13. q. Thiel L. G. 11 arbaugh.. C Wheeler. Boggs .C. I'la.r -.- 1. G. Capron ..,, it: G. Bell L T. Se Bows R. T. Ackerson I, E.iDouglass R. E. Stevenson -..,......Q. 13, 1B0 Yle . St B. Hopkins R. H. B. Bird L. H. B. Dodge L. H. B. Fisk R. H. B. Evans. Wbetmore..F. B. Knapp F. B. ScoreKnox, 6; Grinnell. 5. Place and date Willard FIstd. Oct. 14, If499, TouchdownsBird. Bell. Goal from fieldDodge. RefereoBoopte. I-moireBeadle. LinesmenBose and Manning. Time of halve9-25 and 20 minutes. Lewin Institute, 28; CIA. Athenteum, The Lewis institute defeated the Athenaeum team in a one-sided -contest yesterday. the score at the end of the ten minutes halves being 28 to O. The lineup: -- - - Lewis. Athenteum. Goehring T. E. iSfordue R. E. Sullivan R. T.43,un4rum R. T. Chadwick R. G. lriochhouse R. G. Ludwi g C.1W ins' ow Mencel L.- G. Warrofi L. G. Stoll L. T. ''ttandier L. T. L. E Mora ache L. E. Burrell .. Q. 11.1Hewlett Q Hinchliff R. H. R. Replogle .R. H. R. Stein H. R. Jilergong L. H. B. Varn4-11 F B. Burnham ir B. TouchdowngHtnehliff 12). Varnell MI. Burrril. GoaleVarnell. 3. Referes--Sloan. - Minnesota, 35; Carleton, 5. Minneapolis. Minn.. Oct. 14.---(SpeciallThe University of Minnesota football team won from Carleton College today 85 to 5. Carletores only icor, wag on a goal kicked from ths field. The university team showed great improvement over Its former appearance. At the end of the first half the score was 12 to k but Is the second half the university Wen played a bard. fast garnet. Williasus;12; talon, 5. WIT1larnetown, Maas Oct. 14.--(SpeciallWm. lams defeated Urnon this afternoon on Weston Field by a seore of 12 bo 5. Union got Its score by a placed kick ir01:31 the Add from the:13-yaird i. PART THREE. SPORTING. -.4PAAP4IAAPdhoA0404A1A04' RUMBLE CORNELL'S PRME MAROONS DECISIVELY DEFEAT THE TEAM FROM rnticA. Score at the Close of Thirty.Minuto Halves Is 17 to 6Showing of the Visiting Eleven, Is a Distinct Die.. pointmens. Their Play Being RaggedCoach Stagg's Work with - the Chicago Men Develops Remarkable Improvement. Chicago humbled the pride of Cornell yesterday afternoon, sending the Ithacans home disgracefully beaten. That the work of the Cornell team was such a distinct disappointment after the boasts it had made of certain victory was one great surprise. Another and even greater surprise was the beautiful work of the maroon team, which played Cornell to a standstill, and did not permit its much-vaunted end runs to materialize once. The score was 17 to 6. The most significant fact about the whole game is that Captain Kennedy did not play. Had he been in condition it is only a question of how much larger the score against Cornell would have been. Captain Kennedy said after the game to a big crowd of students, who began to celebrate: " Well, the Cornell fellows came out here and met the farmers. Here we are. They had their practice game. I thought they would need me. but they didn't." The result of the game was not only a triumph for Chicago, but it was one of the greatest triumphs Mr. Stagg has ever experienced as a coach. The work he accomplished in three days with what was a thoroughly broken up and disorganized team was nothing short of wonderful. No such rapid improvement has ever been shown by a Western team in so short a time. Sueeesefully Revives an Old Play. Coach Stagg brought out the tackle back play he invented several seasons ago and tried it on Cornell. It was remarkably effective. Slaker's work was the best of the day. He went down the field yards at a time. He did not fail to make two yards on any attempt. a remarkable performance against a team supposed to be first-class in the East. Wellington's work was also especially worthy of commendation. Cornell's end runs, which were thought to be the chief play to be feared by the maroons, failed every time, Hamill's work behind the line In tackling the runner being probably the best he ever did. He thoroughly redeemed himself for any poor work he may have done this year. It was not a spectacular game, but it was good football. Chicago plugged the left tackle of the Cornell team until he was used up. trying the other side of the line occasionally, and in the second half Cornell began to bring in new men. A guard and a tackle bad to be substituted. Captain Star-buck was carried from the field. fighting against being removed, but thoroughly battered up in going at the maroon line, which held in a most remarkable manner at times. Walbridge got enough and left half back position. - Chicago played the same team throughout the game, not a substitution being necessary. Cornell's Interference for end runs was broken up by Wellington's weight smashing Into it. along with that of Slaker and the other backs. Cornell absolutely could not gain with it. The line bucking of Cornell was erratic. At times good gains were made and at other times Chicago managed to stop the rushes completely. The crowd was a disappointment. The big stands were not nearly as well filled as had been expected, 'which was probably caused by the protest of many lovers of football against $2 rates for good seats. There were probably 6,000 people at the game, and they saw one of the finest and most exciting contests witnessed on Marshall Field in a number of seasons. Bar Against a Hot Time la Lifted. The University of Chicago band played " There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight and went unrebuked. although that is a tabooed melody at the university, its moral tone not being considered altogther compatible with scholastic life. Chicago rooted better than it has in a long time. and the short. choppy yell of Cornell adherents rivaled the Chicago shout What advantage there was in the wind at the start Cornell secured, winning the back. giving Chicago the ball near the middle of the field. It was a critical moment. Everybody was on edge to see what the maroons would do and what their plan of attack would be. Henry gave the signal, one tackle dropped back. The formation was at once recognized by old-timers as the play which Stagg invented several seasons ago and worked havoc with against the Western teams. Would it work against Cornell? It did. The first play was a line buck. Slaker's hooded head broke through the Cornell line for a short gain. The play was not sufficiently decisive to relieve the crowd. Another of the same kind was tried and Slaker had earned a first down in two scrimmages for Chicago. The crowd breathed more easily. Chicago could make headway. Succeeding plays confirmed the fact that Chicago could get through the line without trouble. Henry a little later got a twelve-yard gain on a short run by a delayed pass. Everything was going well. It took Chicago five minutes to get to the center of the field. Then came misfortunes. First Hamill lost trying for an end run. then Wellington was forced back, and to crown the trouble a high pass went over Wellington's head, and Chicago lost twenty yards. but retained the ball. It looked dark, but Slaker began some magnificent line bucking and Chicago rushed the ball up the field by short bucks, the Cornell line yielding to the pounding of Wellington. Slaker, and Hamill. The ball walked along until it was twenty-two yards from the Cornell goal. Then " Duke " Wellington wiggled out of the bunch, and. zigzagging down the field, scored a touchdown, while Stagg did a war dance on the side lines and everybody yelled himself hoarse. Chicago had scored just seventeen minutes after the &tart. Considerable money changed hands on that one occurrence. The punt out was a, failure and Chicago could not kick goal. Cornell Leads for & Time. Cornell scored next. It came about through a bad kick by Wellington, which gave the ball to Cornell within reaching distance of the goal. Previous to this Cornell had got up within five yards of the maroon goal, but had been forced back by beautiful defensive work. Cornell began sending Starbuck plunging through and over the line and Cornell soon scored, Starbuck doing most of the wont and carrying the ball over. Cornell kicked the goal and was one point ahead. It looked like a case of the side having the ball walking down the field with it and that the call of time would cut an important figure, but this proved an unfounded fear. Chicago's next score came aftet a funny performance. A Cornell man got his back In the way of a kick and sent the ball scurrying towards his own goal. Chicago got the ball. It was only a few yards from the Cornell goal. and then began a magnificent struggle. the first downs being measured nearly every time by the linesmen. and often a few inches settling the possession of the ball. Slaker's battering-ram head was again sent hammering away st Cornell's line and another touchdown countedt. This time a. goal was made and the score was 11 to 6 in Chicago's favor. Chicago's score was made with one minute to play. so the rest of the half was devoted to kicking off. In the next half Chicago kicked frequently. having the wind and not caring to wear out the men unnecesfarily until within a favorable distance of the goal. This came about the middle of the last mit. Chicago again sent Wellington and Slaker battering away at the crumbling defense of Cornell and made the score 17 to 6, and Cornell had no hope of winning the game, but fought pluckily to score again. It was without avail. for Chicago improved as the half went along and seemed to hold better then than at any time, which was probably due to the weakened condition of the Ithacans. It was one of the prettiest contests eve! , seen ea Marshall Field, and means a grey) g ! f ii 1 .- 164 ,. I ; niona . ,i )E T TIT1 In,.p NEW YOT PILLER TELI AND 0 nefereo Likely an4 War of W Sailor" t. Tour for Interest 1111 Battles. BY Now York, Zght scheduled ea Friday, Oct. - - - , . 1r PAECT TEIREE. spoR.G4 t 4 - PART TFIREE. 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Only by the wonderful punting of Captain ,. ?et Penn's defeat was clean and decisive. The O'Dea, supported by what Everts Wrenn ,' ( Newe Indians won because they played a faster, characterized as great end work- On every ,-- ye e: more consistent kind of football. Penn sylpunt two or three of the team were ready to eee ; :, ,,;: vania lost by reason of a number of things, le , down in his tracks whoever caught the ball. 4 -, L Apo . , ii -., a weak line contributing more to the down- Twice the lanky Atzstralian sent the pig ekin :: e vi are 1 : , :::,: fall than any other fault in the team. There :;. 'eeeeeZIT40e- oe ::: :: whiring throug th h e air for sixty yards, to 't . 1..0 e : was no luck lying around loose on the grid- which fumbling by the Northwestern backs e , , , . Iron today. There were no flukes, and what - - at one time acided ten- Twice, too, he sent ' .0,,, e',., a,..00e. ;", -,e,,e, few fumbles happened brought no marked the ball squarely between the goal poste. -Nee, 'eeeersose , , : :, ee , advantage to either team. , - ,,,,,,,s No less remarkable than. O'Dea's 'work ,..4148... . , - . :f - e : e ::,. The Indians played straight, old-fashioned was that of Feele. He carried the ball close eesea . I ::::e:04 ,-, football, with little use of tricks. Pennsyl- to MO yards, making- five touchdowns ee- in all ,, - , ,:ee-,,,e. ., .e,,.: e e vania had recourse time and again to the The ball was probably in his hands ba ,, ,-, n of redoubtable guards back formation and est '" :,', ., e.: , : '; ,I e :',-'......: ti, the time when en WiSCOriSiIeS pamession arid , ' employed the doublee pass frequently. But , '' - seese f . e,: repeatedly he picked his way around the end , ...e , :., -, ;:.: ,--- ' eee e-ele ,;, , -.' :::;:, eti ,e, at only one period in the game did the and through openings in the line for gains of .., - --e ,,: ::,; ea. , ee"eeee-,:e ,:e ::':!, et ee guards back avail to any great extent. The ten and fifteen yards. '" 'tee, :".:,':: :,:'..ii :,:::.:,'V'',,-',,:ek , : :-,:;:::":4::::::; ..1;, 4;'',. redskins had been on the trail of that fa- The great surprise of the day was when ,:;e :-,! 7: ,y i.,, '7. : i.Z, , It.,. 71. .:, : , mous mass play for moons and they stopped Northwes tern sprung the old Pennsylvania A e-e,, 's e '27 Ir e, , 1 ,' ,i :: e e ,e,:e. -. ::": ::, :1,6; fee' it repeatedly. Again and again Peares r tandem play on tackle. Starting in the mid- ' e ere, , ., r.:c!,,...t,::,,. ,, ::,;: ,-,..,.: guards plunged into the line, only to be Elle of the field it pushed the ball steadily "e-,' ill , , e: ' ...':',;::',,...e:' r,, , , ,:-:,,,.:,: '. 0 fre e, dashed to pieces upon the Indians' defense. ,,e, e : -: s - :: e e ;e:i.,,,::- '',:: " - ." Ye,: ..e e Neal down towards the goal, while the Badgers i, A e ez ,,,e, 4z...eh - , :: ,,' ,: te fee Penres ends were outplayed at every points did not seem to know what to make of it. , ;ergo", : e ::',. :,..: k: e, ee : :::ee,,,,e ' ee eee and it was through the tackles and ends the With the ball on Wisconsines twenty-five- teee,11.:7::.''.:','" ': ' ::, i';, : N , N O' :' Indians found most of their openings. yard line the purple made the mistake of ' tee: . :: '''',e,',,,.: e s I!; l'-;';''''"''' 'i1:r' Coombs of Pennsylvania outpunted his op- - trying to repeat the performance of the , ... -a, : ",, :,'. e , '',, e e -' e".:e: 1! 4 A rl A ' 4, i ' . ponent at every kick, but the advantage of cardinal Captain and score a goal from the "4., .., ,': ., - : ,, ..",e-. e , .4 eee", Ilecet,,, N-9 , l',:,, ,:, ..,, ,.::;1 ,. ...:44' -41' ,... 3.3'..i,...'.',. , his superior expenditure of leg muscle was field. A poor pass from center gave the o s Badger ends an opportunity to get in and Wee e V e , ela ), , . :el : ... "-, e , de :, ,eeeeek, ,,,"" , lost by the slowness d inaccurac y f his thus - -fewe e ee - . :- eee e e , -7,,,,,e, 's; field. i ends in getting down the Pierce ee e ieeet , l e' e: ,, ':. - block it, us epoiling Northwestern's cruy A V 7,40. ,',,' 7.!, :, ,.. ' ..., . -'s ) ,. st :, ,?.:71. I kicked with ground, less precision over less chance in the game of scoring. If North- ,,,,,..i,...1,.,.,:p , .,, ,,,:e,s., k" : i T.:.:-::,- ,,. , ..,-.,,,, I but the Indian ends were always in at the etee,.....s. western had continued to pound away whet ikiltici: '' ...e- ,kee :, : e: ....., t ,.t4',,,, ''eee"-b!1;":-' ::"e: re death and the Penn player who caught t - e '' ' " ' " ' ' e 4 ee - .,- eee th ,, rarely advanced e ball before being Its tandem play It-Could probably have ad- 3N, ,, c,,, :,: : :,7'...i :' A,c.r: ..: : I r N. , ; , i ,' vaneed the ball some distance before the 4":.,,,eat.,e,'eie:e: : : , :.-e. e e ee ,:: :":- ,,,e e, 'e downed. - Badgers learned how to stop it-possibly for 1:1-..i.:?: -':' :' :::c.:.;;, fv ':- :: ,:::: ,...,:;,:f!!'or. $ n di. , .-i,4-,..7 Pen Kick. Goal from Flel - z.Z;:.- - : ' :: , ' ,- trg 4,: a touchdown. , e t : :::':-:: ::': ,: i "' ,, e.-te,.' ";;- i It was this same excellence carried too fee In working this play Captain Little was , ee, .,41"..: - . e,,;" ,, eeereeee: e ee!'"',1e".',"7-5e,-.' e, on the part of the Indian ends which re- "' s- 'lessesob, ' t e almost a team in himself. Several times he 4, 'tti. er; , , , . i I uited in Penn's only score. Pierce punte . :., 4,, 44, , , ..e broke through the line for five yards or k . , e, ,ee i ,. ee, ",,,e e : ':, , 4 te from his own 5-yard line. Kennedy caughl better and all through the game he was the - ' -,a, -''''' : " " '''''",,,' V : but was toppled over by Sickles before the , - - . life of the team. ' - '- '-'50 e;,,, - ee ) -'1 , ball reached his hands. For this Penn re- Badger- Defene.eDlianpointtnN. '.....e N,,,,.- ceived 15 yards and a free kick, and with ,: :, " Wisconsin's defense was a disappointment, : - .: t e this opportunity and at a difficult angle a I and the Northwestern players all unite in ,,.,, s ' ...,-,v-"::.::::' goTahlefrfoamvortihtee fieoludnadagsaitrnitendgsmuceetehsosdfuolfl3;11. c saying unless it is greatly Improved in the '. ' ' , next week 'Yale will push the Badgers all - i I e: e - . . :: e:: Indians was to send the backs through be- over the field. ,, tween tackle and end, and the men with the The one bright feature of the game was the 7. ,,'4:',:e:': : -' ::': :"::' ball seldom failed to find a hole. Both way in which the punts were sent off and : 4 :':'''',':;:, Gardiner at left end and Howell at right end covered. Captain O'Dea's high twisters I ,:e found great difficulty in getting into the e :, game, the Indian interference proving al- ,'' - - - : gave the ends plenty of time to get down the .., field, and when the ball came down Cechems, --.,1 ' ':I':.: - : g'' .:.. : : :,,.:-. most puncture proof. s Juneau, and Blair or Curtis were waiting to ::' . " . never :: e, Hudson's work in the back field ha : - ' : " : down the runner. Northwestern, on the :-:. e , . , been surpassed on any gridiron. He fum- other hand, seemed unable to get its kicks e e ,:e: -: -.. 'ea..-e" ;::': : ::::, :: : bled but of h nce, although the of g m off. Half the time they were blocked, or ,i e 1111 1) p largely game was made mdandee else Machesney, who did the punting for !-', ' 0 ' 4' ': ', :,: ., , ,.,,::. r ,yr., , :,,: often ran the ball back twenty yards or the purple, was tackled for a loss. Once lee ' more. His specialty is kicking goals from nbnngbttyhacek in first this h n half On a ':,::, :-, , :, , when Wiscons i f in punted the ball out from e ' , - : e' '7',,, the sle missed was o e as its twenty-five-yard line Captain O'Dea -, A : , -: , , 'let :,, ::: greatly i d is ability feared by tried his new twister, which goes high and 1 ' : ' - '4,, :is"' an easy chance durraei then comes down almost indirect perpendic- '1114 ' - second trial, from a greater distance, he sent tear. I '''''"e ' t was a puzzler for the Methodists ., , , : ,., ,i , k''s " 1 ' -. ' e',...ele the pigskin neatly whirling over the bar. and the Badgers got it on a fumble. , , Woodley replaced J. Gardner at quarter Northwestern was weak at end, and not - -"'''.-- back, and Perin's team work improved. A .. . ....... --,.,,... --........41- ea41,rbl el. mnanhemr aYki,it ecamee to enter the hearts of the I . , , - - , , , - - , , ' , , , , , - , , - ' - , - - - - , - ------- -- --,-e;it-c;st. .. . R. H. B. j a.J. u. am v ., a Lu o cal-Lieu. Oskaloosa. O -- - - fifteen-yard-line and the latter ran it back to the thirty-yard mark before he was - Williatax,-12; 'Union, IS. and seemed to hold better then than at any Vheelen.lita..ills- F. IL Scoring Become. Basler. downed. Pierce got through the center for m time, which was probably due to the weak- 'olumbla. O. Referee Rodgers was put in at center by Wisconsin :Northwestern; A., 6; South Side A., 0. wiamotown. Maas., Oct. 141,--(SpeciallWIll ened condition of the Ithacan. more ms eea afternoon Weston 4 reDashielt LehigiL In the second half, and A. Chamberlain taken In a flereely-fought game Yesterday m Jive yards and Seneca made seven at orning ta dfted Union this osi It was one of the prettiest contests eve! - r aa- cc- 5sAtne a haivaa--- back to right half, Northwestern Amiderny defeated on Shenherd kl The Badgers took &big A.- atk, Ed - Academy 14 41, score ot a to 0. right tace, Pierces tumble oa the IleZt aatki the So ue . , i etiki tizora tue sita trum tjae.:4-3-ard ulna seen en Marshall Field, and meatus agree) a s ac c . . - Field by a aeore or 12 to 5. Union gnt its b

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