Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California on July 14, 1961 · 3
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Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California · 3

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Oakland, California
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Friday, July 14, 1961
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3
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Miss U.S.A. Surprises Daddy bE fl mW. iM r AP Wirephoto MISS USA SHARON BROWN AIMS FOR UNIVERSE Louisiana beauty won scepter, crown at Miami Beach MIAMI BEACH, Fla., July 14 - UP) "My daddy will probably faint when he hears this," said Sharon Brown moments after she was crowned Miss U.S.A. "He thought I should improve my carriage. That's why I went to modeling school." Roy Brown, a contractor, had not' come to watch his daughter compete in the beauty pageant, and Sharon was anxious to break away from the well wishers to phone home the news: "I think I'll call collect," she said and laughed through her tears at her joke. The 18-year-old brunette from Minden, La., won the right last night to represent the nation against 47 foreign entries for the Miss Universe title. The last 90 minutes of the two-day competition will be televised nationally Saturday night. Sharon was chosen to succeed Linda Bement of Salt Lake City, Utah, last year's Miss U.S.A. and Miss Universe, from five girls who reached the finals. The four runners-up, in this order, were Pamela Stettler, 18, of San Rafael, Calif.; Karen Weller, 18, of Las Vegas, Nev.; Alexa Currey, 22, New York City, and Suel-len, 19, of Fairfax, Ala. Sharon, at 5-foot-7, was one of the tallest of the 43 girls who competed in the Miss U.S.A. contest. Her measurements are 36-23-36. She has been a model and beauty contest winner since February, 1960 when she won the "Miss Stock Show" crown at Waterproof, then her home town. "The Rotary club entered me," Sharon said. "I was a senior in high school. I won, but when the contest was over they told me not to enter another without some training. "My parents thought it would be a good idea; my father thought I didn't walk properly, so I was entered in a modeling school at Monroe. I drove the 100 miles every Tuesday after chemistry class?' "I'd like to do some television commercials like opening refrigerators, but I'd probably get my thumb jammed in the door," she said. "I'm going to finish college first." Sharon has just completed her freshman year at Louisiana Tech, where she is majoring in speech and drama. A newsman asked her what she was going to do with the $1,000 she had won. "What," she cried, "You mean I've won $1,000? I didn't read about that. I have no idea what I'll do with it." JFK Offered Foreign Aid Compromise Church Group Blocks Move Of Night Club Judge Sherwin Indicted for Tax Evasion Continued from Page 1 maximum sentence of 5 years imprisonment and $10,000 fine , on each count. For filing false returns, the maximum sen- !. tence could be 3 years impris- ' onment and $5,000 fine on ' each count. Sherwin's attorney said government officials have also hinted at a possible civil liability of $65,000 in taxes and penalties. The . Government claims Sherwin reported $21,222 in-' come and paid $5,743 in taxes ( in 1954 when tne income : should have been $33,993 and ;the tax $11,396. In 1955, the declared income was $20,796 - and the tax $5,582, instead of $32,664 and $10,732, the com plaint charges. It lists the 1956 f income declaration at $22,986 i and the tax at $6,414 and says those figures should have fbeen $35,354 and $12,007. Sherwin, 60, had been an attorney here since receiving I his law degree from the Uni versity of California in 1926 i'He served in the Assembly ' from 1944 to 1953 and headed ; the important Ways and Means Committee. ; He was appointed to the i Superior Court here by then ' Gov. Earl Warren in 1953 Auto Makers, Union Get Down to Cases DETROIT, July 14 If) After nearly two and one-half weeks of bargaining, the auto companies and the United Auto Workers came to grips today on issues that could lead to a strike in the auto industry if they aren't settled by the end of next month. The issues represent the union's bread - and - butter demandshigher wages and improved fringe benefits. General Motors Corp. served notice yesterday that "both subjects will be a most serious pari, of our collective bargain ing talks until the very end." Present three-year contracts with GM, Ford and Chrysler expire Aug. 31. GM Vice President Louis G. Seaton said, "We say this be cause it is obvious too great an increase in employment costs whether in the form of wages, fringe benefits, or both, can only push up costs to the point where renewed inflation would again result in rising prices." The union singled out GM in outlining its wage demands for the first time. They figured out to an increase of at least 26 cents an hour in the basic wages of GM's 310,-000 production workers. This would include the 17 cents an hour cost of living allowance UAW members now receive in addition to straight time pay of $2.55. The UAW put no estimates on its wage demands but it issued a statement declaring it was inaccurate and mis leading to say they would i union's bargaining team , at amount basically to an in-1 GM, said in no way could the crease of 26 cents an hour. UAW Vice President Leonard Woodcock, head of the 17 cents cost of living allow ance be considered "new money. WASHINGTON, July 14- (UPD President Kennedy was reported today to have found unacceptable an initial Republican compromise offer on foreign aid financing. This beeame known after Kennedy met with five Demo crats and two Republicans of the House Foreign Affairs Committee on his request for authority to make advance foreign aid commitments for as long as five years and to finance the program from Treasury borrowing. Rep. Walter Judd (R. Minn.), a GOP foreign leader, countered with an offer to accept the five-year advance commitments but require Congressional control of actual spending on a year-to-year basis. Judd did not at tend the meeting today. Rep. William S. Broom-field (R., Mich.) said after the 45-minute session with Kennedy that he felt the President might be willing to reduce the length of commit ments to three or four years. But Broomfield said he got the idea Kennedy would stand fast on his proposed financ ing, which Republicans oppose as "back door financing." Broomfield called the discussion with Kennedy "very healthy" but emphasized that "nothing concrete was decided." He said Kennedy listened carefully to the opinions of the House members as well as giving them his own thoughts. Oakland Tribune, E 3 Fridav. Julv 14. 1961 ml - , Protests by a church group will prevent Slim Jenkins from moving his night spot to a former mayonnaise factory. Jenkins must leave the lo cation at 1748 7th St. where his night cluz has been an Oakland landmark for 26 years because the building has been sold and will be torn down to make way for a service station. Ttoday James Quinn, hearing officer for the city manager, turned down an application for a cabaret permit for Jenkins' proposed new spot at 975 West Grand Ave. Quinn said he had no al tentative because of protests by 13 members, mainly wo men, of the Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church at 1028 West Grand Ave., across the street and 227 feet from the proposed new location. A city ordinance prohibits operation of a cabaret within 300 feet of a place of worship if there are protests. Jenkins has operated his spot for more than a quarter of a century and all city de partments, including police report the place never has been a problem. STORM MAY V DELAY 2ND ; ASTRONAUT - CAPE CANAVERAL, Joly 14 (UPP Bad weather in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean is threatening United States , plans to rocket another man j into space next Tuesday. Scientists running the Na tion's $400 million "Project . Mercury" astronaut program were keeping a close watch, today on an area of thunder- showers about 200 miles east of the Lesser Antilles. The "weak to moderate easterly wave" was reported moving westward early today. A more northerly course might carry it east of Grand Bahama Island into the spot where the astronaut's capsule would plunge into the sea. . Sculptor Nicolosi Dies at 67 in L.A. 1A)S ANGELES, July K-tfl Tyoe-iv-tVi ATiiaIvCi C7 nn sculptor whose works are displayed in many of the nation's.-large cities, died yesterday; apparently of a heart attack. Nicolosi, also a poet and an author, was born in Italy and came to the United States when he was 19. i WslflZ'Zm ill Vl .J i I J i 1 I HERE ARE ADDRESSES OF NATIONAL AND STATE LEGISLATORS U.S. Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel end U.S sen. Clair Engle, Senate Office Building wasningion, U.V.. Rep. Juffery Cohelan, 7th District, But Auuma o Aiill.. Oik . n. i-fc,- B! nw. wevi yc r. minci , gin, rcfi, juhi r i Baldwin Jr., th, House Office Building, Washinoton. DC (Cohelan represents Berkeley, Albany, Emeryville, Piedmont and uamano, west ot LaKesnore Ave and the Municipal Auditorium; Miller represents Alameda, East Oakland and Southern Alameda County; Baldwin represents contra Losre ana soianc Counties). Stat senators and assemblymen, trie state capitoi Buiiaing, Sacramento, cant Alameda County-State Sen. John W Holmdahi. Assemblymen Carlo), Bee, 13th District; Reeen w crown, ton, Nicholas Petris, ISth; Walter I. Dahl, Hth; William Byron Rumford. 17th; Don Mulford. 18th. Contra Costa County State Sen. George Miller Jr., Assemblymen Jerome R. waidie. win District: jonn i ,nox, inn. BROADWAY AT 20TH OAKLAND ONLY e TE 2-1111 e SHOP THIS FRI. TIL 9 P.M., SAT. 9:30-5:30 Low price! 3 carefree styles! NEW SHAGBAR DRESSES Shape-up longleg panty girdle by BESTFORM! Small price for all this famous figure control! Power net with satin elastic hip panels, lace panel front, vertical stretch back. Slimming split hip, thigh control, too. 1" stay-up top. White. S,M,L,XL sizes 5.95 With zipper, 2" stay-up top 6.95 CORSET SHOP, Capwell't Basement, OAKLAND eaklanoiiftgribune OAKLAND'S LOCALLY OWNED LOCALLY CONTROLLED DAILY teeHHU on Continental Side ef San Francises Bay Established February 11, 1174 Member America Newspaper puoHsnen Assotietii Charter Member Audit Bureau of Circulation Complete Associated Press Service For Metropolitan Oaklet) Pull United Press International Service MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press is entitled fx delivery to the use for republication ol all the local news printed in mil awoiaair as wall as all AP newt dispatches TNE TRIBUNE PUBLISHING CO PUBLISHERS JOS R. KNOWLAND, President and JOS R KNOWLAND, J St.. Assistant Publisher and General Maaeeer WILLIAM F KNOWLAND Assistant PHaMsher and Editor. MAKOLO B FOHSTEREK, Secretary Treasurer PUBLICATION OFFICE: Tribune Build Inf. corner of Thirteenth and Franklin Street I rIW( Te! IWplti&elt" -0M. Entered es second-class matter Feb reery 11. mt, at the Pest office at Oakland, California, sneer Act at Congress March o, nWv r wni Dal hi One week One Month l One Yeai VM BT MAIL (payable In advance) (Miry tno Jiinwr California Nevada and Ollllk . One Month IS ' Owe Year Sunday Only California Nevada and Oiliest One Month J-J One Year M at Other States Daily and Sender on Month " One Veer av ceases: Deity etten. lew pBpjH0asfewaaTaEsWM .I I ElI -J . i fj V I I Iff '"v ,V f New1 Sid Jerome cotton threesome, com- TfEEfi i isftii : iawL ifini JeLla n , j. , JfeJ, fji pletely washable, tubfast, easy-care! ff Jkj A-Sheath style: button and bow trim, L Vir GsV-' Jit pockets, back zipper, fall-tone stripes. aii tne ma-news sx nem: opur Dermuaa coiiar. ran coiors. r , bh i m ' I (.-Shirtwaist: classic plaid! Tab-button j tf I New Cupioni rayon dresses 5.99 ''. -MeH 9niK I 9 B. SIZES 12 TO 20f Wi TO 2AVi HHH: H tow price: Dig cnoice: mmSm 7 v 7 C 4 l cittcidiu, tiidyenid, lurquoise, DiacK, wniTe V Ogaef&s JnwWfiPMfcWw. v :T Itl ' . M IJl Itfl 5PORTC.WFAR Cim..!!1. B..i rtAlfl AWn jjKSBSH TV BH t:- it iu m ii i iin i si r::zwjnbUBbi iwr: swass!BrssssswiesaA. iim i t er.y am Mr sr a t t eaa i i i wwassssssssvai w .- i " i j Yassssessssssswai Wf"W'' BT aawawa aawajf -wajwaawaja aw. m mm 11 IF X V . ' MmMW' IbW I COTTON SWAP r inw.l I R. .-.. OAKLAMIi W ' '-el. .. A ' ' -fk 5

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