The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on November 11, 1955 · Page 1
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 1

Publication:
Location:
Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Friday, November 11, 1955
Page:
Page 1
Start Free Trial
Cancel

BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS THE DOMINANT NEWSPAPER OP NORTHEAST ARKANSAS AND SOUTHEAST MISSOURI YOL. LI—NO. 196 Blythcvllle Courier Blythcvlllc Daily News Blythevllle Herald Mississippi Valley Leader BLYTHEVILLE, ARKANSAS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 195D SIXTEEN PAGES Except Sunday Published Daily SINGLE COPY FIVE CENTS Egypt Said Purchasing Italian Jets Report Says Pact Sighed 6 Months Ago By FRED ZL'SY ROME (AP) — The Middle East Arms race took a new twist today with a report by authoritative sources that Egypt has a contract with an Italian firm for 30 Vampire jet fighters. If the fighters are delivered— under an agreement reportedly signed six months ago—it would mean . Egypt was getting arms from a NATO member as well as from the Communist bloc. It seemed reasonably certain pressure would be brought on the Italian government to block delivery of the Vampires to check a dangerous arms buildup where Egyptian and Israeli guns are glaring: at each other. The Western Powers favor holding down arms deliveries to both sides, through fear of a major Arab-Jewish conflict. Getting- Red Arms Egypt already is receiving large : Jpments of weapons from Com-1 munist-government Czechoslovakia j via Russian Black Sea ports. This! deal is reported to cover 200 So-j viet-built MlG jet fighters and 100 Russian-made tanks plus a half dozen submarines, all at cutrate prices. Buchanan Gains As Vote Recount Ends WORK FOR PEPPERS — If you have any household jobs, might hold on to them until tomorrow. Blythevllle High School Red Peppers Club will be out tomorrow in search of such jobs as they are doing here. It's annual fund raising program. Pictured are Anelia Wood, Toby Long and Gena Gaines. (Courier News Photo) Brazilian Capital Tense After Army Ousts President Luz Big 4 Parley Set to Adjourn Wednesday By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER GENEVA (AP) — The Big Four foreign ministers decided in secret session today to adjourn their current Geneva conference with a final meeting next Wednesday. The American delegation issued * this formal statement: Margin Higher After New Check Of City Ballots As lawyers for E. R. Jackson and Toler Buchanan looked over their shoulders, Mississippi County's Election Commission this morning set about recounting the 4,050 votes cast in last Tuesday's municipal election. Early recount showed little change in the total. Election Commission met in the court house at Osceola and approved a request by the Jackson forces # # # "The ministers at their private meeting this afternoon, bearing in mind their agreement at New York ] that the conference would last • three weeks, agreed to organize i their work here so that the con- j ference could finish its work on j Wednesday." | This will conclude the conference '. one day short of the three-week target. The conference so far has been I notable mainly for the evidence it j has provided that Soviet foreign policy tactic 1 - have taken the, most radical shift since the death of By FRED L. STROZIER RJO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Brazilian army, led by Gen. Henrique Teixeira Lott, A correspondent for the National ; ousted provisional President Carols Coimbra D. Luz and took over the government early today. HMI quoted mn^ei Ga°mai Ab"! The navy and air force refused to support the army coup and issued a joint statement del Nasser as saying some of the pledging loyalty to Luz. A few hours later the fashionable Copacabana Beach section was j Joseph staiin more than two years new Communist-supplied arms ai- rocked by cannon fire from Copacana fort. \ ago ' ready are on the Egyptian-Israeli — - - + Witnesses said the fort's, big! guns were fired across the bow In Stoning Incident border. Informed sources gave this account of (he Italian deal: Six months. ago Egypt signed a contract with the Macchi Co.. which makes Vampires under license from the British designers. for 30 planes to be paid for in cash in Italian currency. Deliveries are expected to start next month. Under a previous arrangement. Macchi delivered 16 Vampires to Egypt prior to last February. From French, Too Egyptian Intelligence sources were claiming 1 Israel received 36 French-made Mystere-3 jet fighters in recent months, six of them passing through Rome only 10 or 12 days ago. The Egyptians are believed to have signed for the Vampires after the French turned down their request for Mysteres. The report of Egypt s deal with Macchi may give new urcency to Israel's request for U. S. arms aid. MORE In New York. Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe SharetL said his country, "if driven to a light cor- Three Youths Get Suspended Terms In Circuit Court Three young men, who pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the widely-publicized "stoning incident" relative to the death of a Negro woman here 4ast summer, were given suspended sentences yesterday. Hugh Ma honey, 18, and Jim mi? grand larceny. He was arrested in connection with the theft of an es- Koonce. 18. both of Joiner, and Mil- Ion Burks. 17. of Burdette appeared before Circuit Judge Charles Light yesterday. They were being held in connection with the death of Lettle Gil-1 Charles liam. 55 year old Negro who was i B»™ " >' cnl '' s suspended walking home on July 9 when hit inj afler he pleaded guilty lo a charge Harder Tactics Unless evidence of Russian be- a warship heading out of the: havior at the current Big Four harbor and that the ship turned: conference is completely deceptive, Dac jr j the softer line of Soviet strategy Army units took over central; has been replaced by a return to police headquarters and the office much harder tactics, of the mayor, and issued an order; For the first time since the closing all stores at noon. Other! Kremlin started its more concilia- units surrounded government build- j lory approach toward the West in inas, the radio station, the post! early 1953, a Soviet spokesman has office and several newspaper build- been speaking out in blunt, uncom- i]),T S p omising terms on great issues. Lott issued a communique claim-! Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov ing support of the president of the ! has made it unmistakably clear Supreme Court the-presidents of i that the major aims of Soviet world both houses of Congress and most army officers in Rio de Janeiro and the interior. Conflicting Reports Luz was rumored to have taken refuge aboard the cruiser Barrosa, but. other reports said he and several ministers had been arrested. The Navy Ministry was surround-. ed by armed marines with field pieces spotted strategically nrarby. ner and our existence is at stake. , would "seek and accent arms from' passing truck. any source in the world." But he; Lengthy Investigation added he knew of no offer by Russia to sell Israel weapons. timated S400 worth of clothing from a BIytheville cleaning establishment. Luther Halbrooks was i sentence " was haPPenina. A special session of Ci MS culled to decide who Jackson Calls City Election Fraudulent Mayor E. R. Jackson's petition filed with the County Election Commission charges there were sweeping irregularities in the city election of last Tuesday. It asks that all the ballots be thrown out and, in the same breath, petitions for a recount. Leveling serious charges at the I that illegal votes were cast by out- conduct of the election, Jackson's of-town residents and in any num- petition asks that none of the ballots be counted because the election was not valid. ber of ways. Complaints The Mayor's complaint says same Jackson's complaints were i pe0 ple voted twice. It says some brushed aside by the ^County^Elec- j voted in the wrong ward. It says " —i-.-i- •--•-> - ballots weren't counted at all. It mtaintains that ballot boxes used tion Commission which told him he was entitled to a recount -jy the Commission, but that his other j in some instances were illegal, complaints would have to be pressecl through the court. This immediately gave rise speculation that Jackson wo contest the election regardless of the outcome of today's recount, which he obtained. Jackson's long list of complaints j It further states the ballots them! selves were incorrectly printed and to i that irregularities existed in han- policy remain unchanged. The July smiles at the summit conference here have almost vanished in Molotov's November presentation of Russia's position and aims. The latest piece of evidence in this em prying pattern came yesterday when the Soviet foreign I f ar ns to state that, electiorTjudges ; jority of the "legal 7 ' ballots cast | Osaka's 17 largest libraries. The would i dling °f what it termed "baby" 1 voters (presumably, maiden vot-- ersi. absentee ballots and issuance of poll taxes in general. However, the Mayor's petition Japan Likes GWTW ___^ __ ._.._, . t OSAKA, Japan </P) One book Is on the order of "the election goes so! winds up by claiming that the ma-1 among the top five in popularity in that the votes be recounted. Jackson's petition listed more than 20 complaints regarding voting procedure in the election. Without Authority Commission Chairman Jesse Taylor told the Jackson forces that; the Commission does not rule on these allegations, but only on marking of ballots and tabulation of same. Oihe'r charges, he informed them, must go to court, which would have to authorize opening of the sealed boxes which contain ballot stubs. However, Taylor said the Commission was of the opinion Jackson was due a recount., Then with the other two commission members—D. Fred Taylor of Osceola and Johnny Crain of Wilson—the counting began. The Count Up to noon, here's how the vote changed: Seay , box — Buchanan lost one when ballot thrown out. City Hall box—Buchanan gained one on count and Jackson lost one. Gill box—No change. Water Co. Box—No change. Ward Three—-Buchanan gained two and Jackson lost four. Ward Four — Buchanan total same (174). Jackson lost one v»te, recount total 190. Absentee — Same. Adjusted recount total — Buchanan 2,030, Jackson 2,016. Claude Cooper and Ed Cook were on hand with Jackson and Joe Rhodes was there with Buchanan. Rio de Janeiro did not even knowi the eye by a rock thrown from a I <* abandonment of pregnant wife. Judge Light ordered the defendant to pay Mrs. Holbrouk's lyin Later she was taken to Chicka- sswba Hospital where it was deemed In keeping- with its po!'ry of try- i r.eressary to remove the damaged ing to,prevent a Middle East arms' eye. Shortly after the operation, she pact Washington has been in no hurry to supply the list of arms for which Israel has been shop- died. That set off a lengthy investigation' by Sheriff W. R. Berryman and Chief of Police John Foster Berryman finally came up with the Sharett said he was "disconcert-j il[Test of the Uiree youths who stood ping. Welcomes Offer expenses and the court costs. Coy Wolford, Franklin Pennington and Don Pennington were given sentences of six, t\vo and four years respectively in the state penitentiary on charges of burglary. Judge Light suspended one year of Franklin's sentence. Judge Light told the youths that ed" by British Prime Minister j Eden's statement Wednesday night See MID-EAST on Page 8 Red Proposal Defeated In UN Committee ence placed on each. Autry Speaks L. H. Autry. superintendent they were eligible to apply for pact ; role after serving one-third of their •- sentence. James M. Moore was sentenced to two years for burglary and grand Burdette Schools and longtime state legislator, and the Rev. Orville McGuire spoke in behalf of the boys. The Gilliani incident climaxed a scries of .similar reckless behavior on city streets which had Negro residents and some white people more or less terrorized during early summer months. During that time, a white woman was hit by a rock, though not injured; a bottle was thrown at a larceny. i parked car and a Negro man was ..UNITED NATIONS. N. Y. i/P) — The U. N. Political Committee, after three days' bitter discussion, beat down today a strong Soviet ard A?inn drive to invite North Korea to its debate on Korean prob-; knocked down by some object, stick* eills - ins* from a parsing vehicle.. The GO-Nation commitlee, how-1 However, when the Gilliam woman ever, approved a U. S. proposal to j <ilc[i an investigation got going full invite South Korea to take part m j throttle, the incidents subsided, the debate. This followed the pat-1 Jud Li5nt Wam0( , the b u t tern of previous years, but the issue . (n . co ,, ]d be reca , led into court on was much more hotly contested this ; lne mnns]nu6htei . clllll . fif , lf tney time - i failed to behave themselves. The first test came on the Amen- ! can proposal, which was approved: In ° tlwr actl ™ yesterday: 44 - 5, with nine abstentions. But Perry Todd was sentenced to 21 Syria insisted on having a vote on ; years in the state penitentiary after her proposal to invite both North j a Circuit Court jury returned a ver- and South Korea. The vote on this was 14 in frvor, .34 against and 10 abstaining. diet of guilty to a charge of carnal abuse involving daughter. his 12-year-old Last year only the five Soviet i Willie Gene Daniels was sentenced bloc countries voted to invite the j to three years in the state peniten- North Koreans. tiary on a charge of burglary and Couple's Hearing Is Continued The cases of Alice Nails and Arthur Guajardo, both charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor, were continued to Monday li.im'ster spoke on disarmament. j didn't count the votes properly, and ' were cast in favor of Jackson. There had been .speculation here The bloodless group was carried: that Mnlolov might make some out so quietlv most residents ol | gesture, toward agreement with the 1 West, perhaps on President Eisenhower's proposal for immediate U. S.-Soviel exchange of military blueprints and reciprocal aerial i- spcction, Instead Molotov delivered the Soviet spokesman at the Eisenhower plan. Rejected Finn Terming Russia's attitude 1 book: "Gone with the Wind." would assume the presidency. Luz, former president of the House of Deputies, took over as hardest blow yet struck by temporary president only last Tuesday. The navy and air force issued a joint statement saying they "re- Grahnm Surbury this j pres j den [ bec °^ e of his decision by Judge morning. The Nails woman was released on her own recognizance and Guajardo posted a SoOO-bond in the state cases. Louise Acree, charged with selling beer to a minor, was released on $75 bond. Her case was continued to Tuesday. The city case of Ora Lee Dankey, charged with driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, was continued to tomorrow. Olin ChailJand forfeited a $10 bond on a speeding charge and Robert II. Rhodes forfeited bond of $19.75 on a charge of operating a vehicle with improper lights. main and will remain loyal" 10 the President. At midmorning, the capital con tinned calm, but an air of ten sion was apparent in official circles. Cabinet ministers. including Minister of Justice Prario Kelly were reported under arrest. . Only last night Gen. Henrique Teixeira Lott. who had been hold inp; (he lid down on army elements which wanted to prevent the inauguration of President-elect Jnscelino Kubitschck. resigned as war minister in a dispute with Lii7. After resign ins, Teixeira Lott went to the central army barracks of the federal district and took command. Issues Proclamation He, issued a proclamation to the nation saying a movement was being made against the temporary 'Eternally Grateful' Eisenhower Leaves Denver for Washington By ERNEST B. VACCARO DENVER (AP) — "An eternally grateful" President Eisenhower left Denver for Wash- Farm Production Equals Record WASHINGTON OP) — America's harvests are bountiful again this year, aa big as the record set In 1948, In reporting the huge farm output yesterday, the Agriculture Department said one cause was the farmers' abllty to grow 9 per cenfr more per acre this year than in 1948, the previous pcr-acre year. highest yield- The government has been trying to stem the overflow of farm products, in part through cutting down on the amount of land allowed .'or production of certain crops. Up 2 I'cr Cent In estimating the 1955 crops the department said; Corn output would be 3,182,870,000 bushels, 2 per cent above last month's estimate and 7 per cent above the 1954 harvest. The department's gonl for thi.s year was three billion bushesl. The 2 per cent hifjT.ise in the corn, crop estimate is not expected • to depress slumping hog prices much further, however. Corn Is used for hog feed. The new feed grain crop over-all is almost up to the 1948 record. Besides the near-record corn output, sorghum grain and barley production is the second largest on record and oats is the largest. All-time highs were reported for soybeans, hay milk and eggs. Cotton output Is ahead of 1054, til though grown on n per cent fewer acres. The rice estimate falls U per cent below last year's total but 25 per cent less land was devoted to the grain, in ihe case of n colonel whom the re-signed war minister wanted to discipline for political activity. The proclamation said the decision hitci provoked the army and injured its honor. A special session of Congress was called for 6 a.m. KST Gen Alvaro Piuza dc Castro, formerly chief of staff of the army under the late President Octulio Vargas, had been called nut of retirement by Luz to take charge of the War Ministry. Foes of Kubitschek consider him tlu political heir of Vnr^a-^ who killed himself in August. IBM after a coup by some elements nf the armed forces. But Teixiera Lott ruled out any coup tn prevent the installation of Kubitschek, advocating strict compliance with constitutional processes. He had attempted to discipline Col. Jurandyr de Bizarra Mamcde, a member of the staff of Hie Superior Wfir School, for a speech on Nov. 1 which was interpreted as encouraging Kubil-sohek's foffs, Kpjcctcd Hrqucsl But Uw. rejtctcd n request to send the colonel back tn regular army duties. Luz. president of the House of Depu'ies, succeeded to the presidency Tuosdav when President Jono Cafe Filho look an indefinite leave to recover from a heart ailment. 1,117, hnrl denied he Sec BKA/1LIAN on PSRC 8 ward the 'plan "negative," Molotov; ington today after telling of his thanks to all who have aided him in his illness. 'phe President's plane took to the air at 9:02 a.m. (MST). Speaking from the ramp of the Columbine III in raw, damp 36-degree weather, the it would create confi-i President said that the misfortune of his illness made him aware "of how good people are." rejected it and assailed every American argument advanced in "Good Luck. would "be "favorable" if the plan! pj| a j a]lf j for Officers' Wives Print Paper First edition of Lhe Oificers Wives . Briefing came off the presses this! BIytheville Officers Wives Club and contains various reports on thei All three physicians flew back to the capital with the President. Several hundred people, many of UK-MI air force personnel, were waiting at the landing strip for Eisenhowers arrival. A 28-piecc air force band, many of the musicians wearing gloves, \1 [ struck up snappy tunes, nnd tn the people around the world Snyder. the ProMflem's own doc-! A cordon of air police was who had ".-.out up their prayer---" ior; and Col. Thomas W Mailing-' thrown around the landing field for his recovery wlu'n he wns ly. nf the Army's Walter Reed and extra procnutions were being s'ricken seven week.s ago tomo: p - Hospital in Washington f Str-t: IKE LEAVES on Page 8 row. ' The President spoke but briefly', after he and Mrs. Eisenhower i drove up to the ramp of their ] piano to lie greeted by a bi-p-ir-; ti.':;m qronii header! by Democratic, Governor Ed John>tm ;md Repub- the bulletin which will be published monthlv. Weather camel's hair (op roni mid n brown hat. "Not Wholly Lust- Standing on the sixth slop nf! the ram)), he spoke simply and \ with no word about any major' domestic or foreign policy. "Apain. it is time for Mrs. Eisenhower and me to say goodby," I "We leave under somewhat un- NOKTIIEAST AKKANS.AS: Clear; usual clrcum.staiu-e.s this time." to parity cloudy this afternoon, to-} Ho referred thus to his illness night and Saturday, .somewhat I nnd .said that the seven weeks lie warmer this afternoon, scattered! .'pom in the hospital ha not been Miowcrs Saturday colder Saturday i "wholly a loss" for it gave him afternoon. High this afternoon low 1 «"ri Mrs. Kbeiihnwer an under- fOs, low tonight low to mid 40s. , standing "of how good people are." MISSOURI: Partly cloudy this- He (hen paid the medical staff. afternoon; colder northwest and central; turning much colder north tonight and over the state except- extreme southeast Saturday; snow flurries northwest and partly cloudy elsewhere tonight: Saturday .snow with rain or snow south; low tonight, 20 northwest to near iiO southeast; high Saturday lower 30s northwest to 50s southeast. Maximum yesterday--*!. Minimum this morning -15. Sunrise tomorrow—6:30. Sunset torlny—1:5«. Mean temperattirn— M 5. Precipitation 2-1 hours (7 n.ni. 10 7 in.)—none. Pri'cllptiuion Jan. 1 to (liUc~45.LS. This Date Last Year Maximum yesterday—78. Minimum this mornlnt-—45. Precipitation Jan. 1 to dALc--31.93. niir.sf.s. corps m on, enlisted men and oltiers a!. Kit/simons Hospital j "my very graU'iul thanks. ' "They have done so much," he added. A crowd of several thousand turned out to bid farewell to the beaming President along the six- mile drive from the hospital to the air strip at. r.owry Or. White With Him Riding in a big black limousine wilh Mrs. Eisenhower and Mrs. Ooud, the President waved a greeting sill alone the wny. .Fust In-lnie he left iho hospital grounds- a group of youngsters turned up on the curb holding a big sign wli.irh read "Good Lurk, .Ike." A bit further along there was Di-ELLOIVS BA FUND HKGlS' r,OOI)|.'KI,I.OW DlilVF, — Courier News Publisher Harrj W. H.iinos tossed it handful] of silver in the pot this morning aj Le- gionnnire Pnul Mahon looked oil. They were kicking off Pot of bime> campaign which will send Christmas baskets to the city's needy. Paper and Durt Cnson Post are cooperating on sponsorship. (Courier News Photo)

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 8,800+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free