The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 23, 1956 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, February 23, 1956
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Page 5
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 19M BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE ITVB Condeming of Statin By Russian Leaders Smells of Hypocrisy By JAMES MARLOW Associated Press New* Anilyst WASHINGTON (AP) — Stalin's heirs now denounce him like men anxious to get rid of a stench. Becoming so extreme about it so suddenly, they raise an immediate question about themselves. These new Kremlin leaders, tumbling over one another to condemn Stalin at this late date, were his right-hand men either all or part of the 29 years he ran the show in Russia. He died In 1953. II he was as bad as they now say he'was, why did they wait till now to say so? Why djd they not only let him get away with it but cooperate with him and glorify, him in his lifetime? They can't claim ignorance— at what was happening. They were part of it. This makes them hypocrites who either agreed with him in his lifetime or lacked the guts to throw him out, and now put on this act because it serves their purpose. At the Russian Communist party's 2dth Congress last week Stalin was attacked By name or indirectly by party boss Khrushchev, premier Bulganin, Deputy Premiers Malenkov. Suslov, Mikoyan and Kaganovich, and Foreign Minister Molotov. Betrayed Spirit Summed up, this in effect was the catalogue of sins they blamed on their old boss. He betrayed the spirit of the Revolution with one-man rule; he twisted history in his writings; he set back the Revolution with his the party faithful, subversion, subservience (to Russia), and meager rewards. Stalin, in becoming- the symbol of communism, had become the symbol of all the tyrants in his< tory. And for years he had had no new ideas. He had become incapable of taking: advantage of new and favorable situations by changing his tactics. He wasn't letting xpand.—ITe wss frt ing it solid behind the Iron Curtain. The new leaders must, if they are to win against the West change this world view of Russian communism, scoop up in any way they can the nations not attachec lo the West and even soften and break the Western partnerships. They couldn't do it by force without catatrophe for themselves. But as they now make plain in throwing Stalin's bulldozer out the window, there are other ways to try. They talk now of economic help to their neighbors, of letting com munism develop along differen lins in other countries, of Russia as a friend and not a menace, taking over where they can be peaceful and legal means. Thej reserve the idea of forceful over throw for only the biggest anc dbmestic and foreign policies; and ' most anti-Communist countries. some -or all of hs Old Bolshevik comrades, whom he had shot in the purges of the 1930s, were framed. Why this switch by Stalin's heirs? They had to make it. They had to give communism a fresh and attractive look, which meant wiping out the Stalin look. He had left them and communism hanging on a hook. Bv the time of Stalin's death communism, except for what the Bed Chinese could do, was standing still. The VVest was surrounding Russia with allies, er trying to. And Stalin had made communism repulsive, even to an ignorant native of Malaya. Communism the world over had become associated In people's minds with violence, aggression, murder, purge's, liquidation of even Boy Pursues Hit-Run Driver ORLANDO, Fla. If) — Police K ported that a 16-year-old boy on ' motorbike chased a truck 26 block and persuaded the driver to return to the scene of an accident in which two Negro girls were fatally injur ed. Dexter Campbell said he saw the truck' enter an intersection, strike the two children and continue. Police said the youth pursued the truck until driver Johnny Harris, 31-year-old Negro, pulled to the curb and that Campbell then talked Harris into returning. Harris was Jailed without bond NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION IN DELL SCHOOL D1STHICT NO. 23 OF MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, ARKANSAS Notice is hereby given that the innual school election In the above lamed District will be held on March 11, 1956, for the following lurposes: To elect a member of the County Board of Education, Zone 5 for a term of 5 years. To eiect one director for a term of 5 years. To submit the question of voting a total school tax of 39 njills, as set out In the District's budget, which includes, in addition to 30 mills for operation and maintenance of the schools, a building fund tax of 9 mills annually, beginning with the taxes collected in the year 1957, to be voted for the purpose of paying the principal and interest of a proposed bond issue of ?47,500, which will run approximately 10 years, to be issued for the purpose of re- Seary Blowout CHARLESTON, W. Va. Wl—Mrs. Blanche Akers told police she hoUgttt someone had fired a shot nto the house, when a saucer dropped to the floor and shattered Investigating officers solved the mystery. They found that a tire iaf? blown out on a bicycle standing in the kitchen and the vibration dislodging the saucer from the table. funding valid outstanding bonded indebtedness, and said proposed building fund tax will constitute a continuing annual levy until the principal and interest of the proposed bonds are paid in full, with the provision that the surplus each year arising from the building . fund taxes, after providing for principal and interest maturing that year and the next six months' interest on all the outstanding bonds, may be used by the District for calling bonds for payment prior to maturity or tor other school purposes. The polls will open at 8:00 o'clock A.M and will close at 6:30 o'clock P.M on March 17, 1956, at the following polling places in the •District, to-wit: Dell School Agriculture Building, Deil, Arkansas. GIVEN this 8th day of February, 1956. BOARD OP DIRECTORS, DELL SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 23 OP MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, ARKANSAS. By M R. GRIFFIN,' President. And R. B. CRAWFORD, Secretary. for investigation of manslaughter. Mary Alise Williams, 5, and Kirita Marie Stone, 3, died within three hours after the accident. - NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION, Dl'ESS DISTRICT • NO. '56 Notice is hereby given that the annual School Election for the year 1956 will be held in Dyess School District No. 56 of Mississippi County, Arkansas, on Saturday, March 17th, for the purpose of electing school directors, voting no school taftes and on such other measures as may properly be submitted at said election. The Polls will open at 8:00 A.M NOTICE OF ANN I! At SCHOOt ELECTION IN SIIAWNEE SCHOOL PISTHICT NO. 10 OF MISSISSIPPI COUNT!', ARKANSAS Notice is hereby given that the annual school election in the above named district will be held on March 17, 1956, for the following purposes: To elect one director for a term f 5 years To submit the question of voting a total school tax of 50 mills, operation and maintenance of the chools, 12',i mills previously voted or the payment of bonds now outstanding, and a continuing building und tax of 10 mills for a proposed bond issue of $100,000, which will run approximately 20 years, to be ssued for the purpose of erecting and equipping new school buildings and said building fund tax will Constitute fl COntinV*V|F armiial U In Step With Spring at Whitsitt's 3995 The coHume look of ti-to-toe fashion! Full length coat of Wbrstrella, a tissue-weight wool, adopts the Mandarin manner ... its splinter-slim silhouette side- slashed to reveal a printed Surette lining. Glossy Sur- •tte blouse is color-coordinated ... and tapered »kirt Is blessed with self-belt and pockets. Black, navy, moss, geranium, beige or blue. Size 7 to 17. Found Only at Whitsitt's it's Whitsitt's "•tcaiiM you Ittrt Smart Thing*" Whitsitt's Does It Again! We Now Bring You Slender Sheaths of Imported Belgian Linen By The Famed Our Henry's' bewitched . . . he's in love with th* elegant beauty of Imported Belgian linen . . . he's in love with dresses slim as a stalk. The result of this fashion affair ... six wonderful ways to look cool and poised under the sun. And just a few words to the fashion value-wise . . . wouldn't it be smart to stash away several of these for the hot summer days ahead. All are washable, vat dyed'and crease-resistant. All come in sizes 8 to 18. All are priced at $10.95 at Whitsitt's. it's Whitsitt's and close at 6:30 P.M. at the lyess High School Agriculture iulldliig. Given This 22nd Day of Febru- ry. 1956. A. G. McAETHUR, President, Dyess School Board. CLAUDE JEWELL, Secretary. 2/23-3/1-8 until the principal and interest of tilt proposed bonds are paid in full, with the provision that the surplus each year arising from the building fund taxes, after providing for principal and interest maturing that year and the next six months' interest on all outstanding bonds, may be used for calling bonds for payment prior to maturity or for other school purposes. The polls will open at B-.OO o'clock a.m. and close at 6:30 o'clock p.m. at the followint polling places: Shawnee School, Joiner, Ark. Given this 8th day of February, 1956. SHAWNEE SCHuuL DISTRICT NO. 10 OF MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, ARKANSAS. By A. L. EIFL1NG, President. LESLIE E. SPECK, Secretary 2/23-3/1-8 school taxes and on such other measures as may properly be submitted at said election." The polls will be open at 8:00 A.M. and close 6:30 P.M. at the following places: Wilson Tavern, Wilson Arkansas and Whitton School, Whitton, Arkansas. Given this 12th day of February, 1956 J. H. GRAIN, President J E. GRAIN, Secretary 2/16-23-3/1 NOTICE Ot ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION "Notice is hereby given that the Annual Election for the year 1956 will be held in the Wilson School District Number 25 of Mississippi County, Arkansas, on Saturday March 17. for the purpose of elect NOTICE Notice is hereby given that Fred Faught nas filed application with ihe City Engineer, for a Permit to remodel a frame building an Lot 8, Block 1, Ban-on & Lilly Addition to the City of Blytheville. Arkansas, this building to be used as a Grocery Store and Meat Market Any objection to this building being used for the above stated purpose, should be made in writing ano filed with the City Clerk within thirty (30; days. DAN BLODGETT, City Engineer, City of Blytheville Dated: Feb 15, 1956. 2/16-23 Master Mix Feed 16% Dairy Feed J*.»5 cwt Beef Concentrate ..... 4.63 cwt Pig £ Sow Concentrate 4.94 cwt 35% Hoe Concentrate.. 4,98 cwt Pig Wormcr 5.14 cwt Chick Starter 5.01 cvrt Chick Grower 4.45 cwt Egs-ets 4.35 cwt Egg Mash 4.60 cwt Rabbit Pellets 4.50 cwt Horse Feed 3.94 cwt Shorts 2.95 cwt Shelled Corn 2.50 cwt Farmers Soybean Corp. "Home of Sudden Service" Blytheville, Arkansas ComraaM performances in fine china ; WHITF Pr«iideul Woodrow Wttmn Over a period of many years, presidents, kings, diploma** and other famous people throughout tie world have eommissiooed Lenox to create their fine china services: Now, you are most cordially invited to attend an outstanding exhibit of some of ttese celebrated services. Included in this exhibit are famous pieces &oml TMK WHITE IMHJSK PnwMieat Hwy S. Tnuuan THE WHTTE HOTTSC President Franklin fit. Roeeercjj! STATE CeVERNORS" MANSIONS PRESIDENT «F VENEZUELA KINC OF SAl!H •PANMB EMBASSY C. S. EMBAMY SERVICE . . . the same craftsmanship and quality yom sec in the magnificent Lenox Collection are yours i« every Leo** paiteru today. The SOHH. exquisite, translucent china, made by the same master craftsmen, is yours today in every Lenox r-imcm. For there is only one quality of china made by Lenox, the finest. The rare beauty of Lenox china is matched only by ite amazing durability. The rich, glowing colors are made to last for generations, and the gold designs aie of precious 24-k. gold. Out wide selection of the loveliest and most popular Lenox patterns awaits your inspection and admiration. ^•••••^B™^"™^^^^^^ Duma in 24-k. gold wtteat dttign, wariest mxtan shape. 5-pwa pKte *tli«M18.95 S Blytheville's Leading Jeweler Since 1908 JevreHike, enameled floww in «*»fitl nxj jKdm. S-pfei |Mi «M«f

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