The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 3, 1948 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, May 3, 1948
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Page 7
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MONDAY, MAYS, I 'Off the Record' System Rapped ^, Confidential Data * Made Public But D«ni«d Newspapers RI.YTHEYII.LE (ARK.) COURIER NEW* Age Certificates For Minors Who Work Are Urged LITTLE ROCK, May 3— Employ MS covered by tne Fair Labor Slaml- ards Act— Federal wage and hour lav,- — who are planning to hire minors during Ihe school vacation period were advised today t>y John R. Cartwrlghl, representative o( tiw Wage and Hour and Public Con- lrac*.*s DLvinons. u. S. Department Arabs Draw Net Tighter "' Lnbor ' edm '' '» H' 1 * slate, la obtain certificates lor minors ., .. By M< " rr »»»n Smith ItatUd Press W hil« House Reporter WASHINGTON, May 3. (UP) President Truman, Secretary od rBU '"'"" a8e ccr State George C. Marshall and oth- claiming to be one or two years older officials of Ihe government re- er lhan tlle minimum age retmiie- cently have been sharing confldcn- menls for Hie occupation in which tial rflateri*) on foreign policy with : ' lcy sw)t employment. vast numbers of people. [ Such certificates, it was pointed This Is a new -use of the "off-| i)ut D V Cartwrlghl at hi* headquar- the-record" system under which ' '•*''*• 2fle Post of lice Building, North government officials once explained! Little Rock, arc acceptable as proof confidcmlal matters to news cor- of a ? e tinder the law and serve t«> respondents. j protect the employer against un- Tlie way things have been going' Intentional violations of the chiltl lately, niost anybody can hear fln labor section, "off-the-record" statement by the The general minimum age, president or the secretary of slate " " ' If he Just goes to enough diniicrf or conventions. In recent weeks, the president made two important statements about American foreign policy to large groups. One was to a banquet meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors. The other was to the Conference of Business •«k>er Editors. h-; iairi, /s 16 years, with an 18-yenr minimum for particular occupation? found hr.K0.rdcms for children. The child labor section, he pointed on*,, applies to minors employed by producers, msnulacturers or dealers who ship or deliver for shipment in inter.slut€ or foielgn commerce. In this state, Federal certificates of ago. are issued by the Arkansas (Stale Department ol Labor in Little policemen and assorted sonnel. ~n each case, he talked at length • Rock, he said, about thus country's relations with I Russia. And In each, case, his re-! sion was this: the president had marks were off-record At tha ASNE banquet, not only Ihe editors were in the Statler Hotel's huge banquet, hall, but their wives, friends, waiters, busboys, firemen, hotel per- Yet, what the president said was «o confidential that the newspapers could not print It. They were bound by a code of journalistic morals. in this particular case, applied by the editors themselves. ASNE Says "No" After the ASNE banquet, the president's press secretary. Charles G. Ross had no objection to Mr. Reds Claim U.S. Artists' Support 32 Reported to Be Opposing American Leader* and Politics Georgia Governor To S«rv« Only 2 Year* ATLANTA, da., May 3. IIIIM — Allorney 0«n«rai L'ugene cook jald today (hat the man elfclrct governor of Georgia In November will be Ineligible lo «ucc*«d hlnuelf after serving (he remaining two years <>( lh« pr«Miil gubernatorial term, Cook did not, however, rule officially. Tilt lllcCMjifiil candidate (or the MOSCOW. May I (Up) _ Tin u ""P lr * d Portion o( the late uov Literary O«*ett<- yesterday pilni- 0 m~ n ',J~!|!* d ' ! , < ,'' L'"" V" Ukl ed an r-pen letter bearing the nam<u I,' ,, . ?° ?* V I N 0 ^" 1 "" 8™ rt -" A ""n- n ;^«"r|i:fl^^ p ^ Unconfirmed report.! are Indicating dial Arabs are converging on Palestine for a showdown fight with the Jews, This late map shou-s; <n Eight thousand troops from Iraq coming through Trans-Jordan; (2> Vwo trainloads of Infantry Jrom Cairo moving towards Palestine: <3> King Abdullah of Trans-Jordan icndlnj palace guard preparatory to taking command of hla Arab 1 felon. ,-Jilch l« already |,i Palestine— (NBA Teleplldto). met the editors in his office on two previous ASNE meetings here and lalked off-record. The" wanted the same situation to apply in the Statler banquet hall. Their previous meeting* In the president's office, however, were not attended by wives, friends, waiters,: "wigm, D. Eisenhower began a busboys, firemen, ixilicemen and' collrse *l Columbia University lo- assortcd hotel personnel. The group j da >' '" how ^° become a civilian, consisted only of the president, his The former Army chief of staff Gen. Eisenhower Starts Course On How to Become a Civilian staff and the editors. A little over a week ago, the president virtually repeated his ASNE speech to a group of more than 70 business paper editors. He spoke to them in his office. The ASNE published, agreed. But ofr-record^ remarks being | speed,, which followed an on-lhe- V ? dl 'J, rs 1 record radio talk about Inflation, leadership . wa _, madc , o ,, bout 7CO p(!1 . son-s . the said no — Ihe president had been invited to speak off-record and they wanted it to stay that way. Th« reasoning behind this decl- Every Inch Making one of her rare public appearances, Queen Mary arrives kaf-a slate function at St. Paul's Cathedral, London. The Queen Mother, who will soon celebrale her 81st birthday, still looks every Inch a queen. Last week, Marshall discussed foreign policy at confidential length to the U. S. Chamber of Commerce Convention in the same huge Statler ballroom which wns packed lor the occasion. A few paragraphs of what he said were okayed later by the State Department for attribution, but not direct quotation. Some working reporters here reason that If something can be said before hotel waiters and busboys. surely it, t s not loo confidential lor the public at large. Off-Record Talks Frequent At almost every large baii^iel which the president now attends, the feature or the evening Is an extemporaneous and often otf-lhe- record speech. 'He made such speeches recently to the Gridiron Club, the Radio Correspondents Association, and the White H.iuse News Photographers Organization. This device permits him to speak with more freedom that he could if his remarks all were to be taken down for full publication. But use of the same device produces R paradox and raises the question of Just how confidential can a speech be when it is made to an audience of several hundred persons. If a working reporter violates an off-record confidence, the speaker often protests to the reporter's employer. Often the confldence- brenker Is disciplined by being denied access to further off-record material But i public official like the president or the secretary of state has no control whatever over a quasi-public audience like the Chamber of Commerce convention or the ASNE banquet. Since the president spoke to the editors, the gist of what he Jjad to say. confidentially has become common, but imprinted knowledge in Washington- There was nothing to prevent his w-orld.s being cabled to any foreign nation. But without violating journalism's unwritten law of respect for off-the-record material, the American public cannot be told what he said. and his wife took up residence ,,. he university president's home on Mornlngside Heights alter bidding mewcll to the Army yesterday at "•l Myer, - Va. He said he would fake it easy for e next several weeks, working on ll» memoirs, and preparing to ns- •ime the presidencey of Columbia hundred of his You'll Be Hillm 'Em When you feel (hat surge of power and vour motor hrt* all (he zip and go of il.s .voulh—ymnf he hillin' 'cm high and heading for I he open highwav. Now with (ravel im € hcrc,.y Ol ril want In bring your car in for a complete rejuvmation by our experienced mechanics. SHELTON MOTOR HUUL COMPAN,' Phent 4431 HtW«»AtkS». lew neighbors greeted the general on nU arrival. Among them was David syrclt. 9-year-old son of a Columbia assistant professor who 1 '• hands with Eisenhower while toy machlnegun in his Elsenhower grinned. Body of Missing Radio Announcer Found in Lake KNOXVILLE. Tenn.. May. S. (UP) -The book was closed today on the Fise of radio Announcer Thomas -Jcywood Moore. 41. whos» disappearance last February w ns solved late Sunday when his body wns found In nearby Port Londoun Lake City Homicide Officer Cnry Bunch said Heywood drowned and that :here was no evidence o( foul play doore had been missing since Feb. 6, the day he was struck by n triick n downtown Knoxville. He had come from Murfreesboro •enn., only one day before to begin •orklng at a station her* Louisiana Man Killed In Car-Truck Collision ARKADELPmA. Arlt . May (J.P.l—\V. H. Christian. 27. . . Shreveport, La., a par.'-nt at valley Kore, b'a , General Hospital, who was In New York on a weekend pass. Kisenhower refused to discuss anything except Ihe seven-hour trip from Virginia which he said was "' June 7. A crowd of severa molding eft hand. "Son," Gen. ___ 'wait until yon, see novies." . He referred to cameramen Josl- mg eacli other to obtain pictures pf the event. The general also shook hands with ' soldier he x.w h, the crowd and to^wliom he shouted, "I «ee you're The soldier was Pvt Hitter 'very nice." Capt. • John Keneral'g U. Eisenhower, and his wife the and month-old baby, Dwtghi n. Klscn- hower II. are also living temporarily at the Morningslde Drive mansion while young Elsenhower a (tends a refresher course at I he university preparatory to returning to West Point as an insLruclor. Besides an undisclosed number of smiiirely on Ihr side of the flovln Union in oppoAllkm to cuirfiu United stales leadership and policies. Tne letter said the group wanted lo "share the public duly" which lias been a.wigncd the intelllgfiil- sla o[ the Soviet Union, and lh.it It would work to break the chains wllii which United Stale* capitalist have bound creative woikert. The reported authors o( the \n- ler si.ul i hey would help Llie cnuae by -writing new book* and paint- Ing new pictures nn simple facia and Ihe road lo peace, by lelllnij our people the truth and enxwhu all. lies." Among name* at Ihe end of Ihe letters were those ot Howard Fuji, novelist; Marc Blllrslcln, Hollywood composer-playwright. «nrt Alvah ne.sslc, movie writer. Bessie U one of 10 persons recently died lor contempt by the Hntue of Repre- senlatlves lor reluslng lo answer during Itivesllgntlon of Communist activities in Hollywood. Othrri Listed Others lifted were those ol Philip Avercood, IKn field. Rnrbara Halns. Robert Hotney, Sidney finkelsleln, Charles llumboldt, V. V. Jerome. Meri!riel Leaner, Ray Ixiwe, A. li. Mcdglll, Carleloii MOM, Josepn North, Isador Schneider, Howard Scl.sam, Samuel Sillen, Raphael Sawyer, lia Walluch. Theodore Ward, Murk Wcbcr, Uoxle Wllker- f.oii, Walter Bernstein. Arnot 13us- !:eau, Nelson Ahlgren, James Allen, Herbert Apleker. Thomas Ball, B. A. Botkin, Richard Boy*r and Lloyd Brown The letter answered an open letter published recently by 12 leading Soviet nrllstj. Including Kon- Sinionov. Soviet Journalist PAGE SEVEN Campaign /fan/quarters For Holt S*« Up in Hottl l.l'ITLB HOCK, Ark., May 3. (UP) -./nek Holt, a candidate (or gov- .•rnnr of Arkanm, announced today that he li»d engaged space on of hU campaign and tne nam« «f hl.i omiwlgn manager would b* announced later. Holt Is a former attorney m- eral of Arkansas. ' Mothers In ancient Greex* p«j. llie second floor of the Gleasonl fled their crying bable. (Mr* Hotel her. >s )»« campaign head- them a piece of sponge ««k«d ht quarters. He said Ihe opening dale honey. If lher« U no special je.wlmi. Die successful candidate will be Installed In January when the regular session of the legislature In held Cook aald. servants, the genera have a personal military staff composed of MnJ. Robert L. Scliultz, alde-de camp; Warrant Officer Margaret Hayes, his prlvnte secretary; Sgt Leonard Dry, chauffeur; and Sgt John Mooney orderly. A retired chief of staff In entitled to a military stuff for life olid plrtywriRhl. The Russian aflkftl flatly which side the American Intelligentsia [avored. Airport News The Blylhevllle Private Wlers Asoclntfon will hold ll.i monthly five-star general, he will draw meeting at 8 o'clock Thursday night tor that rank for life, even In the Fly-Inn at the Municipal Alr- though on Inactive duty. $200,000 Oriental Rug to Masonic Home port. CIUCAGO (UPi— All oriental mg, which took 10 years lo make by hand and weighs more than l.oobl pounds, has been donated to the Georg* Washington Mn.srmlc Memorial building by a Chicago Importer. rug TI*<, ,-.,>. u j _, , ancr-nt Lv In, *, "' ?'• to thi In? | B V,' W ",' f 1 " 1 as H eonirS,, nn f ""«"l R ' " Uu; "" 511 ! Va - 1 . k |,| ed | nstan( . another truck on Highway 67 one 3. mile south of here. °' U C. Oachot of Little Rnck. drlv- ., , y Saturday when the truck he Inving crashed Into the rear . er ol the other truck, as not hurt. The highway severa] hours. A Civial Aeronautics Admlnlfiirat- ion Inspector will be at the airport May ."> lo Rive written examinations and flight le.slj. A new wall map compoMd of CAA charts has been posted In the Bly- Ihcvllle Flying Service to aid pilots In planning crow-country flight*. Transient pllols who landed here lust wet-k Included the following: J. E. Douglas and C, R. Shelton of Kansas City., Mo,, Howard; Sam O'Baii£N of Pnclinlionla*, Ce.vm» 140; Marvin Mellon of Trumann, Stinson; N. T. Rush of Tulsa, Okla.. Gillis of Popalr Bluff, Mo.. Piper Cruiser; Oscar Foster of Kennett, Wo, Piper Cub. was blocked lor! HM( , Cmirt(!1 . Nfw , w>n| Art> OPEN FOR BUSINESS SAND And GRAVEL River Sand and Gravel Co., Inc. Main St. and River Front Caruthersville, Mo, Phone 305 Ed C. JAMES, Gen. Mgr. Plenty of Towels And fr««h .iMiUoui lito! Smart Miillirr Tnkri Them U "U-Do-lf" Laundry Wash on our modern MAYTAd NfACHINES and dry on our CIAS PIHKD DHtKRS. Open ^ a.m.—close 5::m p.m. Close Saturday at noon. Open Tuesday and Thursday until » p.m. 333 N. Second Street Phone 4'J41. FLYIN'S FUN by RICHARDSON YARBROUGH "Th!» r«nl*d plant will jjel us buck lo lilylhevillc f«*t norKirty will believe we i-Hughl these fish!" BLYTHEVILLE FLYING SERVICE <• ' 'I ICM T T R A ININ r. PKOHE 2717 CHARTER SERVICE IIMKVIIlf III Soybean Recleaning Let us reclean your soybeans. Our new modem cleaner double cleans, removes splits, faulty beans, dirt, trash, weed seeds, for better germination and purity. Blytheville Soybean Corp, 1800 W. Mo in St. Phone 856 Phone 857 -JL-iB A STITCH IN TIME L\ STITCH IN TIMK j«re« nlnt, they my. Actu»Ilj-, )t often saves m»nf many more. Like protecting your family today with life insurant:*. Each dollar ifxnt now—whil« you »r« in good health and still have fime~c*a me»n hundreds of dollars to your family if anything should happen to you. Through the payment of regular premiums you can assure thow de- pendent upon you of tolid protection in th« time of greatest need. Take that "stitch in time" today. L«t a friendly Lif« of Georgia agent draw up a plan to »uit your necdi. THE OLD RELIABLE • 31 N~C~E I B 9 I P I C I — * I I J, H 1 ])i»lricl Office Hwrum BuiMIng, 20S W. Main Street

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